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Full text of "Students' herald"



^Che Students' Herald 






Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College 3£ X. 





* 






n 



»«•< 



i 





i 



SELLS FOR 
PER POUND 



ONE 

THAN 

XXX 



CENT 
THIN 



MORE 
CREAM 



q 



The creameries of the country have become so con- 
vinced <>f the increased value of thick cream over thin 
cream that many of them are paying one cent per pound 
more for cream testing 30 per cent and over than for that 
testing under 30 per cent. The reasons for this are: 

FIRST. -Thick cream makes better butter because It contains less 
milk and therefore keeps In better condition. SECOND. - Thick cream 
is so much less in quanti ty that the cost of transportation is less. 

It is much better for the dairyman to make thick cream, because he has more 
skimmed milk left at home to feed the calves. It then follows that dairymen should 
buy only such separators as can separate thick cream. 



The U. S. Separators 



LEAP THE WORLD 
In This Particular 



Beware of the cheap and poorly constructed Separators that cannot make thick cream, 
would be expensive even If furnished without cost. 



They 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., Bellows Falls, Vermont. 

Eighteen centrally located distributing warehouses throughout the United States and Canada. 



l: 



Headaches 







If you are troubled with headaches, 
eye-aches or have trouble in reading, 
stop at Askren's, The Optician, who 
guarantees to cure these defects or it 
costs you nothing. We use no drugs 
or medicine of any kind. Absolute 
satisfaction guaranteed. :: :: :: :: 



X ASKREN X 

THB GRADUATB OPTICIAN 



I 



I 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Buses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line. 
Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetnos -suitable for class 
parties, etc. Let us call 
jour attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: :: :: :: ;: :: 






1 



PHONE 65 



H. J. Barnhouse 



L W. Phillips 



mm 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



261 



SENIORS 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photon 
graphs made. You 
feel better, so do we, 



Woil's Studio 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market, 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 



Subscribe for 



THE HERALD 

$1 per yean 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six btillis for one dollar. Fine line of ciifars and toilet 
articles, Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

■ On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bunk Building, 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine Unecigarsand toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always In demand. Ladies also i 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y. , Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex.., 
San Francisco, Cal. i , 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS; 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz P, C HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 



GO TO 



Oysters 
IKE HOLBERT'S 



I 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53.. 



GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc; 

r 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best, X X 

W, M. STINGLEY & CO, 



262 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



: TT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 



53art*K0 



DEALE 



Dry -Goods Room. 

20 per cent oft on all our 
Ladles' and Children's Under- 
wear -A dollar's worth for HOc 

Our new stock of Laues ami 
Embroideries on sale this week. 

Royal Worcester Corsets with 
hose supporters, 50 cents and tl. 



Ready-to- Wear Room. 

Special sale on Ladles' suits. 

Ladies' Muslin Underwear on 
salH this week. 

McCall Patterns, 10 cents and 
15 cents, none higher. 



Shoe Room. 

TEN per cent OFF on all our 
Shoes this month. 

Krippendorf-Dittmann Go's 
ladies' shoes are the best you 
can buy. 

Qymnaslum Slippers. 



Hardware Room. 

Keen Kutter (foods. Pocket- 
knives, Razors, Shears, Scissors, 
Saws, Axes, Edge tools. Stoves 
and Ranges. Wilson Improved 
Air-tight Heaters. We will save 
you money on Guns and loaded 
Shells. 



Grocery Room. 

1'ic-can Succotash 10 

]!>c-can Beets 10c 

13c-can Pumpkin toe 

lSc-cnn Lima Beans 5c 

S5c-can Peaches 20c 

35c-bottle Oyster Cocktail 
Sauce 30c 

Set Cups and Saucers 2Tkj 

Vegetable Dishes 5c 

Glass Sauce Dishes 5c 

Oranges. Lemons, Bananas, Ap- 
ples, etc. Murdoek's Heel a. 
Club and Nectar Coffee in pound 
packages and bulk. O. P. I. 
Extracts. Your money back if 
not satisfied. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs 

Phono H8 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Keady-to-wear Goods, shoes. Hardware. 



SPALDING'S 




Official 

Athletic 

Almanac 



FOR 1906 



Edited by JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

Price 10 cents 



• 






Send your name and address 
to our nearest store for 
Spalding's Catalogue of all 
Athletic Sports— it's free. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



I 



New York 

Washington 

Boston 

Kansas City 

Buffalo 

Syracuse 



Chicago 
New Orleans 
Minneapolis 
Cincinnati 
Denver 
Montreal. Can. 



St. Louis 
San Francisco 
Baltimore 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburg 
London, Eng. 



CALL AT 



The LEADER 




And buy your Overshoes, 
Comforts, Blankets, at 10 
per cent discount, and 
Underwear 10 to 20 per 
cent off. :: :: \\ 

While there, ask to see 
their nice, large stock of 

Full Vamp Shoes 




Prices Always Right 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jmc 5tuocnts CVThe 
Kansas Statc Agricultural College 

Motto: Let Every One Cultivate His Oiun Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., February 8, 1906. 



Number 20 



Cross-Country Schedule, 

The committee on track athletics has com- 
pleted arrangements for another series of 
cross-country runs. In addition to the sport 
of the races themselves, these runs have in 
view the development of track athletes, and 
this fact, together with the experience of last 
year, has been kept in mind in formulating 
the present schedule. 

Five races will be run, each over a different 
course. Any student in College may enter 
any or all of these races. In each event the 
man coming in first will score 10 points; sec- 
ond, 7 points; third, 5 points; fourth, 4 points; 
fifth, S prints; sixth, 2 points and the seventh 1 
point. No score will be allowed nor time re- 
corded on runners not finishing within the 
limit of time herewith designated for each 
course. The individual rank will be deter- 
mined by the sum of points won by that man. 
The class rank will be determined by the sum 
of points won by the members of that class. 

A gold medal, given by Professor Hamilton, 
will be awarded to the man ranking highest at 
the completion of the schedule. The second 
man will receive a silver medal given by Pro- 
fessor Cortelyou and a bronze medal will be 
given by Miss Barbour to the man ranking 
thi»d. The winning class will be presented 
with a banner given by the Students' Herald. 

The first run is slated for 4:30 p. M. Satur- 
day, February 17, and unless unfavorable 
weather interferes the races will follow at in- 
tervals of one week. The courses are as fol- 
lows. 

First Run: Start, Garver's Restaurant, west 
around College campus, finish at starting 
point. Distance, 2 miles; time limit, 16 min- 
utes. 

Second Sun: Start, Agricultural Building, 

north to Zuck's Bush, east to Bluemont reser- 



voir, west to starting point. Distance about 
3 miles ; time limit, 28 minutes. 

Third Run: Race track, in city park. Dis- 
tance, 5 miles; time limit, 45 minutes. 

Fourth Run: Start, south College entrance, 
southwest to Ashland bridge, return to start- 
ing point. Distance, about 7 miles; time 
limit, 1 hour, 15 minutes. 

Fifth Run: Race track, in city park. Dis- 
tance, 10 miles; time limit, 1 hour, 45 minutes. 



How Fast Should m Man Run? 

To appreciate football one must know foot- 
ball. Likewise, to appreciate the sport of 
running one should know something of running 
records, and the causes that limit speed in the 
various distances. 

Ignorance of the records not only lessens the 
pleasure of the spectator, but results in a 
misapplication of athletic honor. The best 
athlete that ever ran at K. A. C. received less 
consideration than many of his outclassed 
teammates. Shirley ran his quarter in the 
Normal meet in 53} seconds , a time that would 
make him a likely candidate at a track meet, 
where the average K. S. A. C. athlete would 
appear like a Percheron mare hitched to a 
rubber-tired sulky. 

Another thing regarding which there is 
general ignorance is the comparative difficulty 
of the short and long runs. Ask a K. S. A .C. 
student to run a five-mile race and the probable 
answer will be "Five miles! It nearly kills me 
to run a half-mile." As a matter of fact, such 
physical distress and danger of injury as the 
runner encounters is more pronounced in the 
shorter race. Another thing frequently heard 
by a distance runner is the admiring remark 
"My, but you've got wind," whereas, in truth, 
shortage of breath is the least of the distance 
runner's troubles. 



264 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



In the sprinter we find a man whose ability 
to win rests upon the rapidity of muscle action. 
His energy is derived ft^om the stored material > 
of ithe muscle tissue. *$Bui v let thV' run be. 
lengthened and the oxygen of the. muscles is 
'soon exhausted while carboridHnxide accumu- . 
lates in the blood, giving rise to a sense' of- 
suffocation. The heart and lungs are worked 
to their full capacity, and the speed of the 
runner is governed by the breathing capacity. 
The quarter- and half-mile distances be„t repre- 
sent this type of race and are known to 
runners as the hardest races of the schedule. 

With distances of one or more miles the rate 
of running is reduced until the lungs can ful- 
fill the demand made upon them. With these 
longer runs the limit of speed depends upon 
the nutrition of the tissues and the rate at 
which the waste products of muscle action are 
removed. Whereas, the sprint is a test of 
rapidity of muscle action, and the middle dis- 
tance of lung power, the long run is the meas- 
ure of the capacity for food metabolism. The 
distance runner must have not only good mus- 
cles and good lungs, but his digestive appara- 
tus, liver and kidneys must be in excellent 
working order, and he must : he fed with- 
out being overfed. 

The following tables give some idea of what 
running records should be. The world's rec- 
ords are reduced to the rate in miles per hour 
for the sake of ready comparison of the speeds 
of the various distances. 



Distance. 


World's Record. 


Rate 

per Hour. 


100 vards 


A. 9.60s 
A. 21.20s 
A. 47.00s 
A. lm. 53.40s 
P. 4m. 12.75s 
A. 9m. 9 60s 
A. 24m. 23 40s 
A. 50m, 40 Ms 
P. 2b, 36m, 34 Ms 
P. 5h, 55m. I.Ms 
P. 13b. 26m. 30.00s 
P. I09ta. 18m.29.0fs 


21.24 miles 


220 vards 

440 yards 

% mile 


21.25 miles. 
19.15 miles. 
15 MT miles 


1 mile 


14 28 miles 


2 miles 




5 miles 


12 30 miles 


10 miles 


1 1 hi miles 


25 miles ., 


9 "is miles 


HjO rmles 


8.35 miles. 
7.4 1 miles 


500 miles 


4.69 mfles. 



A = Amateur. P= Professional. 



I 

p 


World's 
Amateur 
Keuord 


= 3 

— ST » 

5. 7 g 

I 


< V 

1 

fa. 


> 

p 


■ 

K. S. A. C. 
Record 
Holder .... 


100 yds. 


9.0s 


9.60s 


9.8s 


10 2s 


Spencer. 


220 yds. 


21.2s 


21.20s 


21.2s 


23 8s 


Edelblute. 


440 yds 


47.0s 


47.75s 


51 0s 


53.2s 


Shirley. 


H mile. 


lm. 53.4s 


lm. 53.40s 


2m. 10 Ms 


2m, 12 6s 


Thurston. 


1 miie.. 


4m, 15.6s 


4m. 23.40s 


4m. 59.0s 


5m, 5 0s 


St auffer. 


2 miles. 


9m, 9.6s 


9m. 40.00s 


10m. 37 0s 


11m. 14 fts 


Hastings. 



In justice to our home records it should be 
remarked that last year was the first time K. 
S. A. C. met an opposing team in track athlet- 



ics, Moreover, . the training period- for class 
track meets has usually been for a period so 
brief as. to be worse than useless, while gym- 
nasiums, physical directors and systematic 
training are^still unknown to K>S. A. C. ath- 
letes.'" 

' Find out what others have run and then find 
out what, you can run. We have six track 
running records and some cross-country time 
1o break, and several track meets in sight. 
Twenty -two men line up for football practice, 
still fewer for basket-hall, but Professor 
Dickens' oiled road will hold every man in 
College. Don't let the basket-ball players do 
it all this winter, but get out and run, for 
health, for pleasure, and for the glory of 
K. S. A. C. Milo M. Hastings, 



Vet School to the Front 

At the recent meeting of the Board of Regents 
an order was made to confer the degree of Doc- 
tor of Veterinary Medicine upon the students 
who complete the veterinary course. The vet- 
erinary boys wish to take advantage of this 
medium to express their appreciation to the 
board for this concession. 

The present veterinary course is the outgrowth 
of a need, arid gives K. S. A, C. a professional 
course which compares favorably with simi- 
lar courses offered by the best of other institu- 
tions. 

K. S. A. C. has been recognized for the high 
character of the work done here in the other 
lines, and the requirements of the new course 
promise that its reputation will be maintained 
in this department. This course will give the 
College prestige which it did not have before. 

Again, we express our gratitude to the 
Regents for recognizing the Veterinary Depart- 
ment in this way, and we gladly acknowledge 
the credit due Doctors Schoenleber and Barnes 
for bringing forcibly to the attention of the 
Regents the character of the work required in 
the department. 

So here's to the success of the veterinary 
course. 

The Cleveland Ladles. 

Those who had the opportunity of hearing 
The Cleveland Ladies' Orchestra should feel 
well repaid for their time and money. We are 
not .a Mozart, but we believe that there has 
been no better musical number rendered since 
the lectures were started. 

The attendance was larger than ever for the 
season, and not a single unpleasant incident 
occurred to mar our full enjoyment of the music. 
We didn't go to sleep either. The fact that all 
the numbers were encored plainly showed that 
the audience appreciated it. There were 



THE STUDENTS* HEEALD. 



265 



enough well-known selections mixed in to aid 
our assimilation- of the "sterner stuff." In 
round figures this number was probably the 
most satisfactory given thus far this season. 
It furnished good study for those musically in- 
clined, while we "other folks" felt mighty well 
entertained. 

We'll have to give the committee a merit 
mark for this number, and we do so willingly. 
Cleveland must not be such a " wild and woolly" 
place as we Kansans think. 

Resolutions. 

Whereas, Some unknown individuals have 
seen lit to post and scatter hand-bills about the 
city of Manhattan and the College campus, 
bearing indecent appellations concerning fel- 
low students of the freshman class, and 

Whereas, Such degrading actions revert to 
the class of 1908, and merit explanation, be it 

Resolved, That we, the class of 1908, do hereby 
denounce the perpetrators of the act, and that 
we will do all possible to bring them to public 
ostracism. Be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
presented to the class of 1009, that they be 
spread, with the minutes of this meeting, upon 
the books of the class of 1008, and that a copy 
be published in the Students' Herald. 

Committee. 

Franklins. 

President Reece faced a full house, as he 
called for order, and after a few preliminaries, 
Miss Church favored us with a fine vocal solo. 
In a debate, the judges were convinced that it 
shows more class spirit to steal the bell clap- 
per, etc., than to engage in class scraps. Mr. 
Seng proved his musical ability by giving two 
good numbers, a violin solo, followed by a 
cornet solo. An essay by Larmor, Editor 
Greenough's "Spectator," and M. M. Justin's 
eight bottles of bottled music, finished the 
program. Messrs. Donnly, Loomis, Rice, and 
Finney were elected to membership. No 1 
society raid -term, but something better doing. 

Kansas Websters. 

In honor of Kansas' birthday, our program 
consisted principally of numbers devoted, in 
various ways, to the praising of Kansas and 
Kansans. 

L. L. Ferguson opened the way for the fol- 
lowing numbers by making us laugh a good 
deal over some- funny anecdotes. Kahl then, 
in his usual breezy style, gave Kansas a boost 
whieh it will not soon forget and perhaps 
never forgive. '"Banty" next confirmed part 
of Kahl's glowing description in a very poet- 
ical way. Reed then— well, Reed is perhaps 



excusable, but we find some of his stories over- 
taxing our faith in his ability to tell all the 
truth very much. , ( . _ '.- 1 

To sweeten all Jihis we had some- delightful 
muSic scattered in between numbers by Rose 
and Miss Brown, and' Miss Lyman. Shuler's 
play pictured vividly how the early Kansas 
settlers must have suffered from Indians and 
"members of the fust family." Following this 
C. S. Conner gave a biographical sketch of 
our martyred President McKinley, and then 
came the climax of the evening when Col well 
monopolized a half hour, in spite of repeated 
protests, in telling us how badly we needed 
oil refineries. Mr. Col well certainly has 
the stick-to- it-iveness and showed us that he 
must have put lots of good, hard work in his 
preparation. W. A. Conner barely had time 
to put on the capping sheaf of the program 
with the "Reporter" before the lights went 
out. We then had a short lantern session, 
after which we prowled around till we found 
somu coats and hats. L. m. J. 



Hamps. 

After the usual amount of red tape had been 
unraveled and some raw material taken in, we 
proceeded to the races. Johnson led off by 
introducing the Misses Drake, who played us 
an excellent double header. Ten trotters were 
entered for the debate, which was the big event 
of the evening. They broke away with a poor 
start, Dear bourne taking the lead, with Seneca 
Jones a close second, but Robertson, was 
crowding them both at the quarter pole. Wil- 
bur, the favorite, hit a fast gait, but could not 
hold out against the long wind and staying 
qualities of Elsas, who passed under the wire 
at the judges' stand three lengths ahead of any 
of his competitors. Bobby saw a rat and be- 
came unmanageable; Bixby flew the track: 
Ryan and Greene started out strong, but soon 
failed, and Bassler seemed unable to trot in 
hobbles. 

Professor Orendorff proved himself to be an 
able instructor of Agriculture. R. R. White 
read his best issue of the "Recorder." Dead 
Kansans were dug up by Shelly, live ones 
were pra'sed by Hawkinson and Nevins 
boosted the young ones. Kate distinguished 
himself by expounding the subject of Kansas 
in history. Ramsey scolded every one and es 
caped without a scratch. After recess, Miss 
Grizzell favored the society with a reading. 

In the business meeting which followed, we 
proceeded to pay out all of our money, and by 
the time we had finished we found that the 
lights were out and that some one else had our 
hats and coats. • ■ J * H * c * 



266 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




One Cultivate Hi* 
Own Qih ii*. '■*-• 

'Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at tbe post-office at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 

P. A. Kienb. Jr. ,'06 Editor-in-ohief 

G rover Kahl. '07 Business Manager 

E. O Far hah. *07 Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08 Local Editor 

S. W Cunningham. '06 Exchange Editor 

C. E. Whipple. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. '07 Subscription Manager 

Grace Hawkins. '08 ' *«*«« t^ii uv«t«r« 

A. G. Phillips. W t Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Swkrt. '04... Alumni Editor 

Jab. R. Coxen. *08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to tbe business 
managers. 

To Insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to tbe business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Feb. 8, 1906. 




It is our desire to make the Herald the best 
College paper in the State. The members of 
the staff are working 1 with that end in view but 
we can not do everything alone. We need the 
support of the students and we must have it to 
make the paper what it should be. In order to 
help us in our effort for improvement we have 
decided to ask each of the literary societies to 
pay four dollars for the space used in the 
Herald each term. At first glance this may 
seem rather unusual, but to us it seems only 
just. Of course the Herald is here to publish 
news of interest and we try to do so. There is 
no lack of things that can be written up in an 
interesting way, but we have to consider the 
expenses. All matter set up in the printing 
office between Tuesday and Saturday of each 
week, costs the Herald nothing, but all work 
that is done on Monday costs thirty cents per 
hour. The society reports are all handed in 
on Monday morning and a large part of the 
Herald printing bill is caused by the labor 
used in setting the type for them. The reports 



are interesting in most cases, but very often 
the space could have been, filled with an 
article equally interesting, and one which 
would have cost nothing. The reports are 
good advertisements for the societies and it 
seems only proper that they should be willing 
to bear part of the expense. It would be well 
for the societies to take the matter up, pass it 
and then to expend a little more energy on the 
reports. Society members, you are interested 
in the students' paper: widen your views and 
show your interest. 



We are presenting this week the rules which 
are to govern the cross-country runs, and we 
ask your careful attention to the column. Every 
class should be represented by a complete team 
of seven men, able to go through to the end of 
the last race, and every man in College will do 
well to spend some of his time on the road en- 
couraging others to work for the prizes which 
are being offered. 

Overabundance of copy last week prevented 
the publication of the article headed "Vet. 
School to the Front.' 1 Although late in the 
day, it is presented in this issue with the hope 
that it will accomplish its purpose and turn a 
few eyes toward the Veterinary Department of 
K. S. A. C. Every one connected with the de- 
partment, both instructors and students, are 
enthusiastic in their work, and the Vet. School 
will probably be heard of later in the world of 
work. 

We are at last ready to declare for a new 
policy, and we hope that our sentiment will be 
looked upon with some degree of consideration. 
We are not averse to the practice of offering 
condolence in the form of resolutions, for we 
think the custom highly proper; but it often 
happens that the committee expresses itself at 
great length, that some of the papers to which 
the resolutions are sent are running on a no- 
profit basis, and that the calls for space are so 
numerous that much copy must be rejected by 
such publications as that mentioned. Now, the 
Herald happens to be running for the general 
good of every one and the particular profit of 
no one. Its columns, however, have a money 
value for the reason that expensive labor is 
employed to publish the paper. It is always 
the editor's wish to fill the columns with the 
most interesting matter to be found. So we 
will now expect all organizations wishing to 
express themselves in printed resolutions to 
stand ready to bear the cost of publication 
that they may have assurance of space in the 
succeeding issue. Herald expenses are high, 
the staff members often sacrafice their meager 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



267 



salaries that bills may be paid, and it is now 
time that a strict business policy should be 
followed. If the matter be sifted and weighed, 
it will be found that the Herald is doing more 
for the College organizations than it is re- 
ceiving from the recipients of its favor. 



Knock* 

There seems to be a general impression that 
the dance given by a few juniors and others 
some time ago was a junior class dance. This 
is wholly wrong. The proposition was not even 
discussed in class meeting, to say nothing of 
passing it. The writer even ventures to state 
that the action of these few did not meet with 
the approval of the class as a whole and 
would never have passed the class had it been 
brought up for discussion. A Junior. 



Agricultural Resolution. 

Whereas, Our all-wise heavenly Father has 
seen fit to take from this life our friend and 
fellow- student, Harry R. Thatcher, whom we 
remember not only as an earnest and sincere 
student, but also as one who was foremost in 
our association ; therefore he it 

Resolved, That we, the members of the Agri- 
cultural Association, extend our sincere sym- 
pathies to the family of the deceased in this 

their great sorrow. D. H. Gripton, 

M. L. Walter, 
R. W. Hull, 

Commit ee, 

Resolutions. 

Whereas, The great and supreme ruler of 
the universe has in His infinite wisdom removed 
from among us one who was a worthy and 
esteemed member of our society, Harry R. 
Thatcher; and 

Whereas, The intimate relations held with 
him in the faithful discharge of his duty in our 
society make it eminently befitting that we re- 
cord our appreciation of him : therefore be it 

Resolved, That the removal of such a life from 
among us leaves a vacancy and a shadow that 
will be deeply realized by all the members of 
this society and by all his friends, and will 
prove a serious loss to the community and the 
public. 

Resolved, That with deep sympathy with rela- 
tives of the deceased we express our hope that 
so great a loss to us all may be overruled for 
good by Him who doeth all things well. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be made a 

part of the permanent records of the Alpha 

Beta Literary Soeity ; that copies be sent to 

the bereaved family and published in the home 

and College papers. Julia V. Wendel, 

Raymond R. Birch, 
Grace D. Pearson. 



College Locals, 

Rennie Greene "grafted" all day Monday. 

Garver was badly whipped last Monday. Ask 
him about it, 

( John Washburn attended Ben Hur in Topek i 
last Saturday. 

Professor Karameyer was unable to mset his 
classes Tuesday, on account of sickness. 

Arthur Holmes, first year last year, is attend- 
ing Park College, near Kansas City, Mt>. 

The basket-ball game with Kansas University 
has been postponed until later in ths season. 

Richard Gitty, stsnographei* for t'ie Fa>rm 
Department, was sick the first part of the waek 

One of the dairy classes had its likeness 
"shot" by a photographer Monday morning. 

E. M. Berkeley, of Somerset county, Penn., 
visited his nephew, Robert Berkeley, last waek. 

Union meetings are being held at the city 
auditorium this week by different churches of 
the city. 

General Manager Dean is trying to get the 
Haskell Indian basket-ball team here in the 
near future. 

The seniors are busy perfecting the details, 
etc., of their class book. It will becalled "The 
'06 Banner." 

John Goslin is sick, and so the slaughter de- 
monstration which was to be held here has 
been called off. 

The Y. M. C. A. annual banqust will be hild 
about the last of February at the Congre- 
gational church. 

D. K. Morris, '08, returned last week and is 
now taking regular work. He attended Ottawa 
University last fall. 

First-class music, first-class crowd and a 
first-class time at the K. N. G. military ball 
next Wednesday evening. 

The Vet. Department will test the College 
dairy herd for tuberculosis this tarm, while 
the short-course students are here. 

"Dr." McCrone, student in the Vet. Depart- 
ment, made a trip to Westmorland last Satur- 
day to test some cattle for tuberculosis. 

Miss Carrie Grizzell visited last week with 
her brother, Emery, and her eousins, Miss 
Gertrude Grizzell and Chastir Grizzell. 

Superintendent Rickman, of thj Printing De- 
partment, made a short business trip to Kan- 
sas City. He returned Monday evening. 

J. E. Payne, '87, who has bien working for 
the Farm Department, will take charge of the 
Garden City Experiment Station this coming 
spring. 



268 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 




Are you ready for mid-term? 

Look for the Y. W. C. A. ad. in this issue. 

Go to Bogren & Holt's for your "nifty" val- 
entines. 

The Ionian burlesque was well attended last 
Saturday. 

Miss Fleta Jefferson visited in the country 
over Sunday. 

Score cards for the basket-ball games are 
being published^ 

Professor ^ McCormiek was in Topeka last 
week on business. 

Joe Montgomery's office is Room 55 of the 
agricultural building. 

Calling cards written to order. Address tr 
call, 517 North Juliette. 

Invitations are out for the senior-junior re- 
ception, to be held February 14. 

C. F. Johnson, '05, visited friends in Man- 
hattan the tirst part of the we.'k. 

Captain Shaffer attended the play "Ben Hur" 
in Topeka, last Saturday evening. 

Milo Phelps, a former member of the '06 
class, visited College last Tuesday. 

Miss Wilma Evans was out of College several 
days last week on account of illness. 

The ground-hog evidently saw his shadow 
Friday, and the effect was instantaneous. 

Mrs. Regent Story visited classes in the do- 
mestic science building one day last week. 

Laura Lyman will sing "Come Unto Me," by 
Lindsey, in chapel, next Saturday morning. 

Milton Snodgrass is very sick with inflama- 
tion of the stomach at Ids home on Moro street. 

Tom White is "much mad," and says that 
his whistle is not tin, and that it cost six bits. 

Prof. W. G. Riste, formerly of the Norton 
County High School, visited the College last 
week. 

Lest you furget; military ball at the Audi- 
torium on East Second street next Wednesday 
evening. 

The dairy class had its picture taken last 
Monday for publication in some of the Dairy 
periodicals. 

Mrs. Faith (Cooper) Dodge, former student, 
renewed old acquaintances in Manhattan sev- 
eral days last week. 

Assistant Melick will give a lecture on 
"Practical Dairying" at the Agricultural As- 
sociation this coming Saturday. 



Miss Bertha Cree left for Colorado, Wed- 
nesday, for a visit with relatives and friends. 

J. R. Coxen, Rennie Green and L. E. Gas- 
ton were out of College for a day or so last 
week on account of sickness. 

The Herald staff members were camping out 
Monday morning. A professor who was on 
the war path was out with a gun. 

Baker University is "swelled up" and is 
quite "chesty" over its victories in athletics. 
Wait until we get through with them. 

Jim Cheney was a bad "little boy " in one of 
his classes the other day and had to sit on the 
high stool along side of Doctor Barnes. 

The Regents granted the seniors permission 
to place an '00 class stone in the new "Hort. ' 
building. Professor Walters is in charge, 

Communications to the Herald should be 
written in lead pencil. Leave a wide margin. 
"Write large and plainly. Poor copy must be 
rejected." 

The Dewey cases that attained notoriety 
about a year ago have been reopened. The 
Dewey estate has a large amount of real estate 
in Manhattan. 

Professor Willard is away this week on the 
agricultural special that is being run by the 
Santa Fe railway. Professor Wood has charge 
of his classes. 

Several students went from here to Topeka, 
Saturday, to attend the play "Ben Hur." 
Among them were Misses Stella Finlayson and 
Charlotte Morton. 

W. O. Mitchell, of Kansas City, managing 
editor of the Missouri rf- Kanmx Farmer, was in 
town last Saturday on business. He visited the 
College while here. 

George Gasser, the general secretary of the 
Y. M, C. A. at Fort Riley, visited College for 
a few days last week. He says that he is the 
only "general" at the fort. 

Mrs. Barbour stopped in Manhattan last 
week for a visit with her daughter, Miss Mar- 
guerite Barbour. Mrs. Barbour is on her way 
from Colorado to her home. 

Students wishing to take up the study of 
Latin should see H. H. Conwell or L. E. Gas- 
ton. A class in charge of an experienced 
instructor will be organized after mid-term. 
Class will meet twice a week. Tuition is low. 

The girl reporter for the Republic, being a 
better judge of oratory than the ones the com- 
mittee imported, picks the winner in last week's 
paper and airs her knowledge of things in 
general and oratory in particular. The soci- 
eties would do well to speak up now and secure 
this authority for the contest next year. 

Last Friday evening the mission-study 
classes met in one of the rooms at the Y. M. 
C. A. house and listened to a most interesting 
talk by Captain Shaffer. He gave, in a very 
interesting conversational way, some of his ex- 
periences while in the Islands, as well as his 
ideas as to the best means of carrying on the 
missionary work among the people. The mis- 
sion-study classes would be glad for an op- 
portunity to hear him again. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



269 



Herald, year, dollar, se?? 

Don't forget the K. N. G. Ball. February U. 

Valentines from one cent to one dollar at 
Lofincfl's. 

Wanted. — Some cats; 25 c?-.its each. Apply 
of Doctor Goss. 

We would like to have your nam; 1 on our 
subscription list. 

Mrs. Emma (Haines) Bower., '67. is visiting- 
relatives in Ohio. 

Lur^est assortment of valentines in town at 
Bn,'r-n & Holt's. 

Two hundred fifty is the Y. M. O* A. mem- 
bers hi j) til is term, 

Trent yourself after mid-term with a bos of 
candy from Kind's Kandy Kitchen. 

The W. R. C will serve refreshments at the 
K. N. G. ball next Wednesday evening. 

• Harvey Haines, a student here a numher' of 
years ago, wants to be treasurer of Riley 
county. 

L. A. Ramsey will be the leader at the regu- 
lar mid-week meeting at the dormitory this 
evening. 

Balls and bats, boxing gloves, baseball 
gloves and mits, watches and jewelry, at 
Lofinck's. 

Rend your friends at home a valentine. You 
will find a large and fine assortment at Var- 
ney's bookstore. 

Weather prophets who said we were not going 
to have any more winter were not in sight 
Monday morning. 

A number of students are knocking on the 
use of the bulletin boards by parties with a 
private "graft" or by theater bills. 

Everybody buys valentines at King's Kandy 
Kitchen on 'Monday. The Y. W. C. A. re- 
ceives the profit on all boxed candy. 

C. K. Davis and Marcia Turner will deliver 
their orations at an entertainment given for 
the benefit of the Library Association next 
week. 

The Corn Breeders* Association will issue an 
"annual" containing all the lectures given dur- 
ing the meetings. The first copy will appear 
soon. 

Professor Kinzer went to Topeka last week 
to witness the slaughter test held there. The 
hogs averaged eighty percent, which is consid- 
ered very good. 

Kansas University has decided to play foot- 
ball next year under the same old rules. This 
means that the rest of the Kansas aggregation 
will do the same. 

|* W. Fielding. '05, is in Cleburne, Tex., 
with the Cleburne Automatic Telephone Com- 
pany. He is well pleased with his work, as 
well as his wages. 

Get vour girl a valentine that she will ap- 
preciate. The Y. W. C. A. girls will sell boxed 
. candy at King's Kandy Kitchen Monday, Feb- 
Hftft? tg. -^etrpw-ceofr reduction. — 



i 



The R agents decidad that khaki uniforms 
for the cadets would be an undeserved luxury. 
They, listened not to the bumble prayers of the 
"rookies" who wanted said (informs.. 

Word has b?en received fronvM'r. and Mrs, 
Harlan, *04, that they reached Manila D/eember 
23. Mr. Harlan will he an instructor of agri- 
culture in the normal school at Ho Ho. 

The Farm Department planted some spring 
wheat, oats and barl -y February 1. All last 
week they plowed and disced the ground pre- 
paratory to planting the spring crops. 

Earl Clayton, freshman in '05, is head man 
on his father's farm, near Admire, Lyons 
county. His father says he is a better farmer 
than he was before he attended K. S. A. C. 

M. C. Phelps, sophomore in "04. was visiting 
old College friends the first of the w. j ek. He is 
now a railway mail clerk on the Missouri Pa- 
cific, running from Kansas City to Hoisington. 

The battalion gallery target practice com- 
menced last week at the Armory. Someeredit- 
ahle records have been made. The ''Vets" 
dodge about during practice with hunted looks 
on their faces. So far none of them have been 
damaged. 

The annual Y. M. ('. A. banquet will be held 
at the Congregational church on Monday even- 
ing, February 19. A larger attendance even 
than last year's is anticipated. Supper will be 
served at 6:00 o'clock, leaving ample time to go 
to the basket-ball game with Nebraska. 

Coach Melick has secured a game of basket- 
ball with Nebraska University, to be played 
about February 19. Nebraska considers itself 
the world's champion, since it has so far been 
undefeated. The team defeated the K. C A. C. 
easily. As it was with considerable expense 
that this game was secured, everybody should 
l turn out and support it. 

W. L. Park, general superintendent, Omaha, 
Neb., J. O. Brinkerhoff, superintendent of Kan- 
i sas Division, and H. G. Kaill, assistant gen- 
j eral freight and passenger agent, both of Kan- 
i sas City, all of the Union Pacific Railway 
! Company, visited College Tuesday. We would 
liked to* have heard what they thought of our 
, farmers' college. 

The first regular meeting of the 4* club was 
held Monday evening, at the home of Ha Hie 
I Smith. The charter members of the order are: 
Ethel McDonald, Bea Alexander, Minnie Con- 
I ver, and Hallie Smith. The following members 
j were initiated by varied and unexpected ad- 
I ministration: Bessie Nicolet, Aline Robideaux, 
Mingonette Yerkes and Helen Westgate. 

□nau 

Avery and Son, of Wakefield, will sell out 
all of their Percheron horses, at Manhattan, 
February 24; The great show stallion, Bosquet 
40105, which has defeated both the first- and 
second-prize winners at the St. Louis Fair, 
and the grand pair of mares, Lena 40417 and 
Mina 31721, first-prize pair at St. Louis and 
never defeated, will be among those to be sold. 
For one week previous to this sale the entire 
stock will be used by the College for stock 
judging. This will give the classes a ehaac«4o 
work *>» soeae- v«*y. iisw* auiuiais* 



/ 



270 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



t 

I 



NEW HATS 



. 




NEW GOODS 
ARRIVING NOW 



S 



«J 



STUDENTS, we are making great prepa rations for you this spring. 
We appreciate your patronage, and will soon be in shape to show 
you one of the nobbiest assortments of Toggery ever offered. :: :: 



■ 

i 



Meet our 



ST JOHN COONS, of Course 



WalkrOrer 

Shoes 



; 



Alumni and Former Students. 



G. W. Gasser, '05, Y. M. C. A. secretary at 
Fort Itiley, was about College a few days last 
week, 

Oscar V. Roller, farmers 1 short-course stu- 
dent in '02, is making a success of farming 
near Her rj ton. 

Mrs. Nina (Church) Womer, D. S. short- 
course student last winter, came down from 
her home in Agra last week for a visit with her 
sister, Erroa Church, 

A. L. Hallsted, '03, who is putting into 
practice some scientific principles of agricul- 
ture in Montgomery county, was visiting 
friends in Manhattan and about College last 
week. 

Laura (Trumbull) Correll and Chas. Correll, 
both '00, are the parents of a little girl, born 
February 4. Mr. Correll is teaching in the city 
schools of Manhattan. 

Alice Ross, Corinne Failyer and Sarah 
Hougham, lonians of the "0,3 class, attended 
the mock oratorical conies- given by the 
lonians in chapel, Saturday. 

All ex-Ionians in and about Manhattan are 
asked to meet at the home of Anna O" Daniel, 
'Oil, corner of L -avenworth and Eighth streets, 
on Monday evening, February 12, at eight 
o clock. This meeting is for the purpose of 
organizing an Ionian alumni association, and 
all former members of the society should be 
present and help the good work along. 




To Buy 



SUITS 

OVERCOATS 

SHOES 



at discount prices. 



E. L. 



Knostman 



Grand Military and Masquerade Ball 



WILL BE GIVEN BY 



Co. I, First Regiment, K. N.G. 
ON THURSDAY EVENING, FEB. 14, 1906 

At Armory, First and Humboldt Sts. 



A CORDIAL INVITATION IS EXTENDED TO ALL STUDENTS 



Music by 
Bates' Celebrated Military Orchestra 



By order Co. Comdr. 
CAPT. M. D. SNODGRASS 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



271 



'»»'»-»» jr - * - » - *■ * 



College Campus Restaurant 

Oysters .- . 25 cents. 

Chilli 15 cents. 

Beef Soup 15 cents. 

CONFECTIONARY, SHORT ORDERS, ETC. 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors. 



NEW AND 2&T 
SCHOOL BOOKS 



R. E. LOFINCK 



SPECTACLES 
GOLD PENS 



DIAMONDS 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA, 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, No- 
tions and Sporting Goods. 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



PROFE8SIOXA L. 


a j STUDIO is the place to £et 

vfl 1 S PHOTOS of any size or t»tvle at 


DK. G. A. CKISE, DIvNTlST. 


34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 


North side of Poyntz Avenue 


DR. J. E. TAYLOIt, DENTIST. 


Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 1K7. 


SUBSCRIBE FOR 

THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 


Res. Phone. Colt :»8 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

1 >rs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. >iw 

Baok Bldg.. Downstairs. Office Phone JOT 


Office phone 41 1 House phone 377 
Dr. H. G. McCormick, Don 1 1st 

Room 16. Union National Bank Building 


GET YOUR YV ^J ^J ^J 
of the Blue Valley 


SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 
It will do you good 


Manufacturing Co. B^st quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

DU/^Mr A MANHATTAN, KAN. 

f^n^^l^iL O TOe N. THIRD ST. 



I 



I 



The Y. W. C. A. will 
have a Special Valen- 
tine sale, Monday, Feb- 
ruary 12, at 



K 



ING'S 
ANDY 
ITCHEN 



The girls will have full charge, and the Y. 
W. C. A. will receive all the profits on box 
candies and peanuts. Buy your friend a box 
of candy for a Valentine. 

10 per cent discount on all sales. 



■■■ 



■■■ 



272 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



WHERE! 

Don't You 'now 



WHERE! WHERE! 

thala" the ow - Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

You can get anything along College supplies that you want? 



PINEST LOT OF STATIONERY IN TOWN 

We represent a student organization, and we want the students' trade. 

We also handle f WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PENS 



-It is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, S^eds & Fuel 



from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 



Phone 67. 



H. H. Bates, flgr. 



Allingham & Beattie 



DEALERS IN 



FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



ofcfcUb GROW 

Elevator on C. R. L 8r P. Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons* 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

M ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 



THE HERALD 

$1 PER YEAR. 



Combination Key Ring, 

Key Tag, Cigar Cutter, 

and Pocket Screw Driver. 




NICKEL PLATED. 

Remember, you get the whole 
'• thing for 10c., Key hirg, ai.d 
all. A good Key Ring costs from 5 to 
1 0c. , tSe Cigir Cutter ii eari'y worth 25c, 
and lh* Pocket Screw Driver is alor.e 
wortS t!i2 pri-e of the en'ire comtiration. 
Oa tjp of all this we throw i.i ihe Name 
Tag. If y :u wint uj to stamp your rarre 
and adJ.es3 on the Tag we will do jo fcr 
1 0c^ extra. Th; regular price for this alone 
13 2)c. Most people have them stamped 
sj that if keys are lost they wiil be returned 
ts the owner. Some don't care to have 
them stamped. We furnish them cih'r 
way. If your dealer doesn't handle them 
you can get them from 

The Taylor Mfg. Co., 



Sale Manufacturers, 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



»— »«» 



I? 



=1 



"THE OLD RELIABLE 



31 



I 



I 



\L 



Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



*L 



Phone 167 



-All Kinds of- 




Ice C 



Oysters 



"*T 



ream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order., Prices Right 



i 



Fountain: 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 

ICE CREAM SODAS 



I 



il 



Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



f 



if you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. ^ If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
<I Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest fl Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1313 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Druiiim Street. 



General Offices: 

74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 You vi lie Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 



>-*y^^**^y* S^SSiS SS^S^^S3RSS^RS^RSSiSiS.SS^/ 



W. S. ELLIOT 










Students' Corduroy Trousers 
Yale Pattern, The Very 
Latest -:- Price, $4.00 










IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING ~ * 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
yean enables us to meet their wants exactly. X X 

312 POYNTZ AVENUE, :: MANHATTAN, KAN. 






i 

St 

8 



The Big Racket 



Stationery, Pencils, Note-books, 
Tablets, Pens and Ink, Photo 
Supplies, Room Furnishings 

Now is the time to Buy Winter Underwear, 

Hosiery and Knit Goods, AS WE HAVE 

MADE PRICES ON THESE GOODS TO 
CLEAN THEM OUT. :: :: ■■ 



#mM%38i^m^?^^ 



s 

% 

* 



^Chc Students' Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X, 





«r 








I 



THICK CREAM 

- - - --- -*- - -. ~ _i_ 

' — ' I ' ^-— l ■ ■ I ■ - * - - — | p | M II 

SELLS FOR ONE CENT MORE 
PER POUND THAN THIN CREAM 

XXX 

fl The creameries of the country have become socon- 
^j) vlnced of the increased value of thick cream over thin 
cream that many of them are paying one cent per pound 
more for cream testing 1 30 per cent and over than for that 
testing under 30 per cent. The reasons for this are: 

FIRST, -Thick cream makes better butter because it contains less 
milk and therefore keeps in better condition. SECOND. -Tbick cream 
ta so much less in quantity that the cost of transportation is less. 

It ia much better for the dairyman to make thick cream, because he has more 
skimmed milk left at home to feed the calves. It then follows that dairymen should 
buy only such separators as can separate thick cream. 



The U. S. Separators 



LEW THE WORLD 
In This Particular 



- Beware of the cheap and poorly constructed Separators that cannot make thick cream. 
would be expensive even if furnished without cost. 



They 



I 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., Bellows Falls, Vermont. 

Eighteen centrally located distributing warehouses throughout the United States and Canada. 



u 



cs 



•*■ 



I 



Headaches 




If you are troubled with headaches, 
eye-aches or have trouble in reading, 
stop at Askren's, The Optician, who 
guarantees to cure these defects or it 
costs you nothing. We use no drugs 
or medicine of any kind. Absolute 
satisfaction guaranteed. :: ::, :: :: 



a:askrena: 

THE GRADUATE OPTICIAN 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Buses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line, 
Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park ' 
Phaetnos suitable for class 
parties, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery One. Bikes a 
specialty. ;; :: :: . :: :: :: 



PHONE 65 






H. J. Barnhause 



L. W. Phillips 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



273 



SENIORS 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photo/ 
graphs made. You 
feel better, so do we. 



Wolfs Studio 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 

Subscribe for 

THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 

The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles. Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 

Best Soda Water 

AT 

Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank HuiJdfnir. 

Porcelain bath tubs. Hue lincclsarsand toilet Articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. * En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. 0| itera- 
tors always in i|<niian<l. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana,. Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Walt for 
Phone 157 



FOR 



BOYS! Oysters 
IKE HOLBERT'S 



GO TO 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



QO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 

offer ycu only the best, X> X> 

W. M. STINGLEY & CO. 



274 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




NEW GOODS 

New Laces, Embroid- 
eries and White Goods 
just In— SEE them. 

READY-TO-WEAR ROOM 

Bargain Prices In 
Ladles' Suits. 

Selling them at less than 
the material is worth. 
New stock of ladies' muslin 
underwear. McCall pat- 
terns, 10 cents and 15 
cents, none higher. 



Shoe Room. 

TEN per cent OFF on all our 
Shoes this month. 

KripperKhnf-Dittmann Co.'s 
ladies' shoes are the best you 
can buy. 

Gymnasium Slippers. 



Hardware Room. 

Keen Kutter poods. Pocket- 
knives, Razors, Shears, Scissors, 
Saws, Axes. Edge touts. Stoves 
and Ranges. Wilson Improved 
Air-tight Heaters. We will save 
you money on Guns and loaded 
She Is. 



Grocery Room, 

15c-can Succotash 10 

15c-can Beets , . . !0c 

13c-can Pumpkin 10c 

13c-c ah Lima Beans 5c 

25c-can Peaches 20c 

35c-bottle Oyster Cocktail 
Sauce.. 20c 

Set Cups and Saucers 25c 

Vegetable Dishes &c 

Glass Sauce Dishes.... 5c 

Oranges. Lemons, Bananas, Ap- 
ples, etc. M urdock * Her in. 
Club and Nectar Coffee in pound 
packages and bulk. O. P. I. 
Extracts. Your money back if 
not satisfied. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs 

Phone 88 for Grower lea, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry- Goods, lteurly-towear Goods, Shoes Hardware. 



SPALDING'S 




Official 

Athletic 

Almanac 



FOR 1906 



Edited by JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

Price 10 cents 



Send your name and address 
to our nearest store for 
Spalding's Catalogue of all 
Athletic Sports— It's free. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



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Washington 


New Orleans 


San Francisco 


Boston 


Minneapolis 


Baltimore 


Kansas City 


Cincinnati 


Philadelphia 


Buffalo 


■ Denver 


Pittsburg 


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Montreal. Can. . 


• London, Eng. 



CALL AT 



The LEADER 




And buy your Overshoes, 
Comforts, Blankets, at 10 
per cent discount, and 
Underwear 10 to 20 per 
cent off. :: :: :: 

While there, ask to see 
their nice, large stock of 

Full Vamp Shoes 







Prices Always Right 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jmc 5tuocnts QtThe 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MotwrbecEvei^GneCttltivateHis OtunGenias. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., February 15, 1906. 



Number 21 



America's Mission to the Nations** 

Cause and effect are inseparable. Every ad- 
vancement is founded on some worthy principle. 
Human d sstiny is not shaped by chance. To- 
day we enjoy a national harmony which lias 
been wrought from danger, discord, and strife. 
We know this harmony results from the appli- 
cation and defence of principles which, living 
throughout mil Ioniums only as a hope, were 
first made a fact by the American colonists. 

Three centuries ago Europe was a scene of 
disorder and revolution. Ignorance was being 
replaced with knowledge; superstition with 
truth. Fundama.ital principles of human 
rights, which, as yet, no man had dared to 
breathe, were being dragged to light. 

The defenders of these principles were the ob- 
jects of the hatred and persecution of their 
many opponents. Too few to resist, too stanch 
and devoted to yield, they sought homes on the 
American continent. Life in the new environ- 
ment was a struggle for existence- Dangers 
and difficulties were on every side; but these 
dangers were faced with an indomitable courage, 
these difficulties surmounted with a stern reso- 
lution that death alone could have shaken. 

Is it strange, then, that the American colo- 
nist was characterized by a strong body, a keen 
intellect, and an inflexible will? Is it strange 
that these sturdy men realized their ability and 
declared their right and resolution to govern 
themselves? And when the right to self-gov- 
ernment was established, do we wonder that 
these people were capable of founding a gov- 
ernment ba ed on naked reason— a govern- 
ment that involved and initiated those prin- 
ciples of equality, justice, and liberty, so 
essential to the happiness and advancement of 
mankind? Thrown upon their own resources, 
and drawn together by common interests and 



♦Oration winning second plaee la the oratorical con- 
test, held January 27, l'JtB. 



common dangers, these outcasts from foreign 
shores weie slowly knit into a nation, the 
people of which, realizing their dependence on 
one another and loving the justice and liberty 
of which they had so long been deprived, were 
fitted and destined to become the leading people 
of the earth. 

Equality of civil rights, and equality of so- 
cial rights, were, in the building of our govern- 
ment, demanded. In fact, such a government 
was made possible by the labors of people who 
were earnestly striving to establish equality 
among themselves. Mark the result! To-day 
every American may truthfully say: "So far 
as social and civil rights are concerned, I rec- 
ognized in every man an equal; I acknowledge 
in no man a superior." 

Again, the love of justice that springs from 
large hearts and generous minds at once found 
voice and recognition among people who had 
learned the lessons of mutual helpfulness and 
mutual respect each for the other. The estab- 
lishment of justice thus became one of the 
avowed purposes of the government. The 
maintenance of justice has been an object for 
which the American people have striven with 
unabated zeal and unparalled effect. 

And further, liberty, that invigorating ele- 
ment in our national life, is the incentive to a 
free and friendly competition among men, 
among companies and corporations— a com- 
petition that can scarcely be surpassed in the 
magnitude of its results. 

Note, for example, its effects on the indi- 
vidual. Every man knows his usefulness, bis 
happiness, and his destiny depends on the man- 
ner in which he uses the talents given him. 
He realizes that his possibilities are unbounded. 
He knows that an humble birth cannot dis- 
qualify him eve 1 for the highest honor that his 
people can give. He knows that to be born 
and reared in luxury does not exempt him 



276 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



from their bitterest hatred. He is conscious 
that he is a man among men. He must take 
his place in the ranks, fi^ht the battles of a 
man and live the life of a man before he can 
command the respect of his countrymen. But 
even this doe* not terininat3 the benefits 
derived from the spirit of eompetiton. It ex- 
tends its all-enveloping-, all -permeating influ- 
ence to the trades, the arts, the industries, 
until it finds a fit comparison only with Na- 
ture's universal law— the survival of the fittest. 

Let us now examine the characteristics of 
the people who have develop 3d under the pro- 
tection of a government the office of which is 
to protect, and not to restrict, the rights of the 
governe**. 

Experience has taught the American that 
"knowledge is pr>wer," for education is one 
of the pillars upon which all enduring institu- 
tions must be built. This fact has led to the 
development of such a perfect school system 
that a liberal education is the birthright of al- 
most every American child. From the little 
country schoolhouse where the young Ameri- 
can first meets and measures brain and brawn 
with his classmate and playfellow, to our 
great colleges and universities, there is the 
interest in school that speaks of a universal 
desire for knowledge, the realization of which 
has made education a cardinal characteristic 
of the American people. Yet, when we remem- 
ber that the people of some of the European 
countries are more highly educated than our- 
selves, we will knnw that our influence ahroad 
must be attrihuted to other things than reach 
and appeal to the hearts and minds of men 
as nothing else has done. 

American industry has not been equalled, or 
even approached, by any people, in any age. 
We are preeminently a nation of doers. The 
tireless energy that characterizes our laborers, 
larmers, tradesmen, and business men, has 
revolutionized the entire industrial world. It 
has attracted men from every country in Europe 
to our shores for the sole purpose. of studying 
our wonderful industrial methods. It has 
added to the accumulated wealth of the human 
family. 

Pessimist* assert that we are merely a nation 
of dollar hunters; that we think of nothing but 
money, care for nothing but money, and as 
a consequence are drifting to destruction. 
Alarmed by the sudden accumulation of im- 
mense fortunes, and the proximity of seeming 
disaster, they fail to comprehend the rapid yet 
stable development of a happy and prosperous 
nation. They forget that this remarkable en- 
ergy of the American, due primarily to the es- 
tablishment of liberty and equality, is also held 



within its rightful limits by those same far- 
reaching principles. As a nation we do accum- 
ulate wealth; as individuals we accumulate 
wealth. But so long as that wealth is applied 
in those channels where it increases the advan- 
tages of each generation over its predecessor, 
it will continue to be an important factor in 
national and international development. 

We now approach a vital consideration as 
regards the characteristics of any people or the 
growth of any nation. 

Love of country has in all time and in all 
history been treated as an inborn element in 
human nature. Yet, it is dus to conditions 
which are just as real and just as changeable 
as are the circumstances that cause the rise or 
decline of any race, or people, or country. 
Our government administers to the needs and 
protects the rights of the individual. It fur- 
nishes those conditions whereby he is absolutely 
independent, and free to enjoy those home as- 
sociations whijh. aft r all, are man's most 
priceless earthly possessions. When such 
blessings are given to mm. is it any wonder 
that they will cherish and seek to perpetuate 
them? They cannot do otherwise! 

In this age of the intellect it is a significant 
fact that our patriotism finds expression 
chiefly in the peaceful pursuits; in a quick and 
unsullied public conscience; in the presence of 
party com pet ion, the dearth of party strife; in 
the manner in which each contributes to the 
benefit of all: and all contrihute to the future 
welfare. Yet when danger by force of arms has 
threatened, our republic has never lacked de- 
fenders. You who are the children of Amer- 
ican homes can understand why ''Old Glory 
has been baptized and rebaptized in blood." 
There is reason for our patriotism! It is the 
result of conditions which make it a natural 
and inevitable consequence! 

This patriotism, linked with that feeling of 
good-will and brotherly love so characteristic 
of Americans— these qualities cannot fail to 
have an uplifting influence among men, among 
nations. The American people have never re- 
mained inattentive to distress and suffering in 
a calamity -stricken section. We have seen evi- 
dence of this fact at the times of the Conemaugh 
disaster, the Chicago fire, the Galveston flood, 
and in countless other instances where sudden 
reverses of fortune have left human beings in 
distress. Nor has this feeling of sympathy for 
these in want been confined to the needy with- 
in our own borders. We have seen train-L>ads 
of grain, donated by the American people, pass 
the markets of our great cities, bound for for- 
eign countries, there to alleviate the sufferings 
of a famine-stricken and oppressed people. You 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



27? 



and I have seen our c mntrymen with one voice 
and one accord giving; help to a foreign country 
in those dark hours of its history when liberty 
was threatened and strength was waning. We 
well remember the days when American blood 
was shed that Cuba's people might seek their 
happiness and shape their destiny by tyranny 
unfettered and unoppressed by false govern- 
ment. The American has many virtues, but 
''the greatest of these is charity"— love in its 
broadest, deepest sense. 

Such is Am *riea. She has traced an unswerv- 
ing course for more than a hundred years- 
years of aJvanceme.it, of enlightenment, of 
growth. To shed a true light on the real func- 
tions of government, to establish a higher con- 
ception of national life and human possibility, 
to exemplify the grand and simple truths that 
have made happier nations and a better world 
—this is her mission and her work. And is 
such a precedent to remain unnoticed or disre- 
garded? Is humanity still to live on in dark- 
ness and oppression? Never! America's ex- 
ample has already begun a movement which 
cannot cease until all government shall con- 
form to the law of right. Steamships, tele- 
graphs—American inventions have broken 
down all barriers that separate the destinies of 
nations. All must adopt one policy, follow 
one example— that example must be the best. 
The hope of nations is centered in the western 
hemisphere. "The world turns round once in 
every twenty-four hours to see what the great 
American Eagle is doing." Yet we have not 
reached our goal. Change is an inevitable 
law of nature. We must grow stronger or 
weaker; we must develop or decay. 

To us, the Americans of the present genera- 
tion, is the destmy of nations entrusted. May 
we ever remember the example that past gener- 
ations have left us. May we always labor, 
even as our fathers have labored, to keep un- 
tarnished those sacred principles that have 
made the mission of America a welcome mes- 
sage to th,i human race. 

This, without question, is your duty and 
mine; this is the task and the reward of every 
American. For with each principle that has 
so contributed to our country's advancement is 
associated a necessity for individual effort, in- 
dividual worth. Name justice: Its safeguard, 
is individual uprightness and integrity. Name 
liberty : It must go hand in hand with individ- 
ual self-restraint. Name equality: Its com- 
plete realization requires of every citizen a 
feeling of brotherhood for and fellowship with 
all his countrymen. 

Shall not we who thanklully inherit the fruits 
of our fa tliers' toil, and eare, and sacrifice, 



also bravely and cheerfully assume Lheir re- 
sponsibility, build upon the foundation they 
have' made, increase the talents given us, and 
exhibit the still more sublime example of a 
grander nation? Then, though the power and 
influence of nations, passing through the vicis- 
situdes of social or governmental evolution, 
may pale and glow even as the flickering boreal 
lights, an unfailing beacon glowing with the 
steady, never-dying light of the north star — 
America, still guarded by happy, home-loving 
populace, still guided by the Master of human 
destinies, shall lead through temporary doubt 
and darkness to an age of truth, and light. 
R. R. Birch. 

Pittsburg Steel. 

If one of the ancient Romans could have takea 
a Rip Van Winkle draught which caused him 
to sleep, not twenty but three thousand years, 
to waken some night in sight of a Ion,*-, low 
building, from one part of w.iich dense, black 
smoke poured from a funnel, to burst into 
flame at intervals, fro.n another pxrt a great 
white flame, brilliant as a lightning flash, 
roared straight up into the sky, while through 
the windows he saw what look id like great, fi ery 
snakes writhing on the floor in showers of 
sparks, and he heard at times muffled roars 
like distant thuider, he would, no doubt, be-« 
lieve he saw the workshop where Vulcan 
forged the thunderbolts of the gods. Our sleepy 
Roman friend would, of course, be much mys- 
tified if he were told the building is a modern 
steel mill, yet his guess would not be far wrong, 
for from that building comes the steel of which 
are built guns, skyscrapers, railroads, engines, 
ships of commerce and war— She thu iderbolts, 
so to speak, used in the battles of men and na- 
tions. 

The native ore, as it comes in long trains 
from the North, gives little hint of its possibil- 
ities after it has gone through its baptism of fire, 
It looks to be only brown dirt, but after going 
through the reducing process it emerges a 
poor quality of molten iron full of desirable 
and undesirable substances. In some cases, 
one part of a steel mill is on the opposite side 
of the river from the other part and then the 
metal is poured in great ladles on cars which 
are rushed across the river by two engines, one 
at each end of the short train, while from the 
river one can see the white glow upon the rims 
of the pots. 

The journey from the reducing furnace is to 

the converters, wherever they iuay be, and here 

the iron is converted into steel. The entire 

process from beginning to end is most spectac- 

I ular, and though tha. view from the outside of 



278 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



the mill is weird, especially at night, it gives 
only a hint of what lies within, for from the 
converter until the finished product is laid out 
to cool, the process is a mixture of brilliant 
showers of sparks, roars of heavy machinery, 
white hot metal and flame. 

As soon as the molten mental Is poured into 
the converter, a blast of air is directed so that 
it blows straight through the metal from the hot- 
torn, and though there is no external heat, the 
carbon and other impurities in the iron begin 
to burn upon coming into contact with the oxy- 
gen, and so keeps the mental hot and purifies 
it at the same time. It is from the converter 
that the great brilliant flame seen from the out- 
side comes. This flame is watched by the con- 
verter attendant, who must have had years of 
experience, and he judges by the changing color 
when the meial has been purified as much as 
it can be by the Bessemer process. 

When the iron is "cooked," the attendants 
throw into the converter the other materials nec- 
essary to make the mass steel, for it must be re- 
membered that steel Is iron mixed with different 
percentages of carbon, manganese, tungesten, 
nickel, chromium, etc , besides various undesir- 
able impurities which cannot be removed by 
commercial processes, and these are all care- 
fully weighed by the chemists who know very 
nearly what the product of the blast will be. 
Grades and varieties of steel are almost as 
numerous as kinds of woods, though they are 
not all made by the Bessemer process. 

The steel— for the metal is not steel until it is 
ready to be poured from the converters— is 
next run into molds which shape the ingot. 
When the steel becomes solid, it is forced from 
the mold and reheated for the rolls. When it 
has reached the rolls, it is in the mill proper. 
The rolling-mill resembles nothing so much as 
a giant clothes-wringer turned by a ponderous 
engine. The old-style mill had reversible en- 
gines, which turned alternately in opposite di- 
rections, and so ran the ingot back and forth. 
It is not necessary to know much of machinery 
to imagine the grinding and pounding of the 
big engines, which run at top speed and reverse 
fifteen or twenty times a minute. The spectator 
feels as though the ground were being torn out 
from under his feet, and he can communicate 
with his companions only by signs. The new- 
style mill is designed to do away somewhat 
with the terrible strains upon the engines, so 
that three rolls are used. The middle roll and 
the bottom one make a pair in one direction, 
and the middle and upper one in the other, so 
that the engine runs constantly in one direction, 
and the carriage only is reversed and raised 
and lowered with the ingot. . •_ 



The carriage is only a floor of rollers, which 
all turn in one direction, and the ingot, weigh- 
ing five or ten tons, is dropped in place by a 
crane from the heating ovens, then begins to 
bump slowly over the rollers to the rolls of the 
mill. The next instant it is seized by the rolls 
and with a quick hiss and sputter it is through, 
noticeably increased in length, but decreased 
in cross- section. It is scarcely through before 
it is quickly turned upon its side, the machin- 
ery is reversed, and the ingot is again through 
the rolls. All the time the operator watches a 
gage-dial, which registers the thickness of the 
piece, and he rolls and rerolls until the ingot is 
in the desired shape. 

It is next run on down the floor, where it 
passes under a huge shear, which cuts the strip 
into pieces of predetermined sizes containing 
just enough metal to make a lonsf she?t of steel 
or steel beam at the next rolling. Then the 
floor opens and the pieces of steel are quickly 
shut in with the flame and smoke for the next 
heating. 

The shape of the rolls for the next rolling 
depends upon the desired shape of the finished 
product. If a steel beam is to be made, the 
mill used will contain three or four pairs of 
rolls, so shaped as to form gradually from the 
blank piece a finished beam at one rolling. 
The finished rail or beam may come from the 
last roll in a one-hundred-foot length, so that 
it must be cut into the proper lengths by a great 
circular saw, which does its work much quicker 
than a carpenter saws a plank. Sometimes 
the second set of rolls is flat, and the product 
Is a long sheet of steel. A part of this process 
is interesting. At intervals, an attendant 
throws great shovelfuls of salt on the plate, 
which at all rolls has streams of water playing 
upon it. The object of salt and water is to 
blow the scale and dirt off the sheet. The for- 
mation of steam from water does the work for 
all steel but plate. In rolling plate the salt is 
added, and as it goes under the rolls the roar 
is deafening. If one imagines a half-dozen 
batteries of artillery setting off all their guns 
at once, he may get some conception of the 
noise made by the salt passing under the rolls. 

As one stands at night, as our party stood, 
where he can take in at a glance a large part 
of the operations of steel making— the white 
glare of the converters; the great red ignots of 
steel swung high in air by the cranes; the glow 
from sixty -two pots of metal being carried from 
one part of the building to another; the yawn- 
ing holes in the floor, from which pour flame 
and smoke as a piece of steel is put into or 
taken out of an oven; just beside the light the 
comparatively darker mills, ~wheee4ong, fiery 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



279 



bars writhe, twist and bend in the darkness; 
trains of still-glowing steftl ff oi °g shooting by: 
pails of steel from big saws, the operators for 
an instant in light bright as noonday, then 
hidden by smoke, darkness, or showers of 
molten steel, while over all presses the deafen- 
ing roar of flame and clangor of machinery— 
hehaa, at least while he looks, a suggestion of 
what an infernal region might be. 

R. A. Carle, '05. 

Clay Center Easily Defeated. 

A rather small crowd saw the College basket- 
ball team win from the Clay Center high-school 
team on February 6, by a score of 47 to 10. 

The game was just as easily won as the score 
would indicate, for at no time did the visitors 
have a chance to win. Had the College boys 
played together all the time and left out some 
of their foolish plays they could have run up a 
much larger score. They showed better team 
work than has been shown before, but at times 
the boys were inclined to play the game alone. 

Carr did the best work for the College, 
throwing twelve goals from the field. "Shorty" 
Haynes played a guard and did good Work, in 
addition to furnishing amusement for the 
crowd. "Shorty" is cool and heady and will 
probably play a guard the remainder of the 

sea son. 

Simpson at center and Tinker and Losey as 
forwards did the best playing for the high 
school. The visitors were little fellows, and 
showed a lack of team work and experience. 
However, they played hard and clean and did 
not kick on the decisions. 

Clay Center K. S. A. C. 

Goals Goals 

Simpson 2 C. Cain........ 3 

A on (Topping 1 

Fullington. RO. "intake-- 

Huesner L. G. Haynes 

Tinker R. F. Carr. 12 

Losey ' L.F. Ferris T 

Total 8 Total 33 

Goals from free throw : Simpson 3 Losey 1. Ferris 1. 



The story of some of his travels, illustrated 
by moving pictures, was very interesting, as 
was also the short sketch of the life and work 
of John Burroughs. Mr. Kellogg is an inter- 
esting talker and one who is able to command 
the attention of his audience. He is wonder- 
fully gifted with the ability to produce the 
song of birds, and this, together with the 
enthusiasm which he puts into his work, makes 
his lecture both interesting and instructive. 



Kellogg, The Bird Man. 

The novelty number of our lecture course, 
the lecture given last Thursday evening by 
Kellogg, the naturalist, was one of the most 
satisfactory numbers of the year. People went 
to hear him hardly knowing what to expect, 
but nearly every one was agreeably surprised. 
He told of bird and animal life and illustrated 
his talk by pictures thrown on the screen. The 
pictures were only fair, many of them being 
somewhat indistinct, but they served nicely to 
bring his subject before the audience. He 
spoke briefly of many different birds, showing 
pictures and giving the calls and song of each 
in a manner that showed him to be a true 
lover of nature. 



Basket-ball. 

The practice games for the basket-ball team 
have all been played and the real season opens 
Monday evening, February 19, when the Univer- 
sity of Nebraska team will be here. The 
Nebraska team is one of the best Collegi teams 
in the United States. Tney defeated the strong 
Baker team and the Kansas City Athletic Club 
team. Washburn plays here next Wednesday 
evening and a close game is sure to take place. 
Washburn defeated our boys at the Glasco 
tournament, but only after a hard contest. 

Tickets will be placed on advance sale for 
the Nebraska and Washburn games. Only 
two hundred seventy-five tickets will be sold, 
one hundred of which will go to the down-town 
people. The admission price will be twenty - 
five cents and those who wish to attend should 
purchase their tickets at once. 

« Webster's Reply to Hayne." 

Under the head of "Knock" in last week's 
Herald "A Junior" takes pleasure in an- 
nouncing that the dance given by the junior 
boys was not a class affair in as much as it 
was not brought up in class meeting. The au- 
thor of this write-up wishes to state that u was 
a junior dance given by the junior boys and 
all juniors understood- that they were invited 
to attend whether they danced or not. Fear 
ing that those who do not dance would be 
offended if the subject was brought up in class 
meeting it was discreetly left out. 

This junior who put in the "knock" on the 
dance seems to be laboring under the delusion 
that he is called upon to settle an imaginary 
difficulty in setting people aright. To stato it 
more plainly he is trying to cause a division 
in the class because he does not believe in 
calling the dance a "junior dance" although 
no one but juniors took part in it. 

If the aforesaid "junior" had as much 
consideration for those who dance as they had 
for him and his kind he would not have broken 
ioto print with a "knock" because he supposed 
he was a Moses ordained and self-appointed to 
stir up trouble. 

He also "ventures" to say that it would not 



280 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



have met the approval of the class if brought 
up in class meeting. I wish to state that 1 
think this junior is venturing beyond the lim- 
its of good judgment in as much as thirty odd 
junior boys took part in making the dance a 
success and very nearly the same number of 
junior girls attended. Then also he forgot to 
count those who do not dance but are broad- 
minded enough to sanction a social affair of 
this kind although they may take no part. 

Those who gave tha dance were loyal enough 
to th?ir class and considered the sentiments of 
those who do not dance enough to refrain from 
bringing it up in class meeting and the author 
of last week s "knock" should show some con- 
sideration for his classmates although dancing 
may not meet his approval. A Junior. 



Tis not enough to know, one must apply, 
And not enough to will; it Is to try,— Goethe. 



ttamp. Musical. 

Saturday night the Hamps. gave an all-music 
program, which proved to be a success, judg- 
ing from the appreciation shown by the "full 
house," plus the three score and over who 
stood up throughout the performance. 

Miss Martin had promised to play a banjo 
solo for Mr. Spriggs, and we were all glad of 
it, for we made her do it again. N. R. Blach- 
\ey sang an animal husbandry vocal solo. 
Harry Porter, with some able help, gave us 
some sweet mandolin music, thus changing the 
scene. Again the scenery was shifted and the 
Ag. Quartet took us back to the country. 
"Papa" Whipple, in his illustrated piano 
solo, proved himself such a master that every 
one in the vast audience held his breath until 
"Papa," by his music, told us that the pranc- 
ing gazelle bad escaped from the roaring lion. 

Joe's "D. S. Quartet" pleased us well; and 
so ended the musical. Greene criticised, but he 
smiled when he did it, so we didn't get mad. 

Court convened after recess with Judge 
Davis on the bench The first case on the 
docket was that of Mr. McCall, on the charge 
of prevarication of the truth. A. D. Holloway, 
the attorney for the State, furnished enough 
evidence to convict anybody, hut "Papa" 
Whipple put up a plea that would have cleared 
him if he had been guilty. By this time it was 
getting late, so we quit. j. h. C. 



Webster Frolic. 

•Perhaps the junior- senior reception was to 
blame— at any rate, Kirk could not be found 
high nor low, so Archie Conner had to call us 
to order. Gilkison led us in devotion, and we j 
began the evening's enjoyment. 

The task of describing in detail each number ' 



would be too strenuous this soon after mid- 
term, so we will give only a brief outline. 

The music was the best that we have had for 
several sessions and as varying in kind as 
Kansas breezes. Miss Ross gave a cornet 
solo, Misses Brown and Harold made the 
piano talk and the Mandolin Club rendered a 
fine selection, and then tried to see how Inng 
we could endure their musical noise. They 
were finally routad in great confusion, but held 
their fort well for a while in spite -A our re- 
peated assault. The Webster Quartet and 
Lormor used nature's instrument in their 
selections. 

In regard to the less artistic part of the 
program, soma of it was good and soma not 
so good. Ths second edition of the Colwell- 
Gibhon controversy was handed out to us by 
Gibbon. J. Smith's number, "Early Morning 
on the Farm, " made us feel just a little home- 
sick. Sol. claims that h3 saw t.»ars in the eyes 
of the audience. To th >se who dislike t;> drill, 
we are glad to announce that, according to 
Blachly and another "ex-rear-ranker," there 
will ba no more military drill at K. S. A. C. 
Soule appeared as a Webster for the first tima, 
to his own as well as our credit. Tne last 
number was a good issue of the "Reporter," 
by Gilkison. 

Walker s and Kiene's men seem to be doing 
soma pretty good foraging, for we added 
nearly a dozen new mm to our fl;>ck. Our 
business session was, as usual, cut short by 
those lights, so we frolicked home to our 



roost. 



L. M. J. 



Ag. Doings. 

Just as the clock pointed to half past two 
Vice-President Hall, in ths ahsence of Presi- 
dent Snodgrass, called the meeting to order. 

Mr. E. E. Greeaough tlien invoked divina 
guidance. We were very glad to welcome 
Messrs. D. K. Morris and Sliipley into our 
association. 

"The Most Profitable Education for a Young 
Man," was discussed very interestingly by our 
"elder" member, Mr. J. J. McCraa. Mr. J. 
M. Cook told us in a pleasing mannar of the 
"Advantages of Kansas as a Dairy Sfiaf." 
"The Origin of th3 Dairy Cow and Some Dairy 
Problems in Kansas" was the subject of a most 
practical and intsresting talk by Profe sor Ma- 
lick. Mr. E. W. Cudney rendered a short but 
interesting declamation. Our "chore bov," 
Ralph Cooley, made us all laugh by reading a 
story of "A Young College Student." 

After the usual amount of fault-finding and 
praising by our critic, we ttaniacted our busi- 
ness and adjourned. E . E. G. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



281 




"A good hater is the next best thing to a 
true friend." 

A good listener is often loved for the brains 
he lacks. — Ex. 

To accept good advice is but to increase 
ones own ability. 

Intemperance is more ruinous than war, fam- 
ine or pestilence. — Gladstone. 

Silence is always safe, and is frequently the 
smartest thing we can say.— Ex. 

What the heart has once owned and had, it 
shall never lose.—//. W. Beecker. 

Where there's a will there's a way, but its 
not always your own way.— Ex. 

The man who is without an idea has gener- 
ally the greatest idea of himself. 

Knowledge and timber should not be much 
used till they are seasoned. —Holmes. 

Each industrious human life that is success- 
ful always cooperates with other lives.— ito. 

Most of the money collected for the poor is 
consumed by middle-class officialdom.— Ex. 

The man who is waiting for something to 
turn up generally has his eye on his toes.- Ex. 

The trouble with some men is that they stare 
up the steps of Success, but never step up the 
stairs. — Ex* 

"I never knew that buildings could see." 
"Didn't, eh! Did you ever hear of one without 
a site?"— Ex. 

"I fear," said the postage stamp on a stu- 
dent's letter to his father, ''I'm not sticking to 
f acts. "— Ex. 

"Gratitude is the fairest blossom which 
springs from tha soul; and the heart of man 
kuoweth none more fragrant. " 

All students who took part in the Spanish- 
American war have been granted free tuition 
at the University of Iowa.— Ex. 

Music is not only a language of mankind, 
but it is the language of nature as well God, 
in creating the world, put music in everything. 
— Ex. 

Iowa State College is considering the propo- 
sition of making admission to all athletic events 
free and taxing the students for the mainte- 
nance of athletic. — Ex, 



Latin Teacher. — "What word in English 
comes from the word/aci'wj, meaning something 
easy?" Bright Sophomore.— "Faculty."— Ex. 

Pour students have been entered at Cornell 
from Bengal, India. These men were sent by 
the Indian government to study agriculture as 
carried on in this country. 

Harvard's faculty abolishes the game of foot- 
ball, and the n?xt day tha eleven elects a foot- 
ball captain for next fall. Looks as if the play- 
ers understood the faculty's bluff.— Ex. 

Fairbank's Scale to Banana Peel.— "What 
are you doing there?" Banana Peel,- "I'm 
lying in wut for the grocer." Scales— "Why, 
I've been doing that for ten years." — Ex. 

It is a wise man who is able to make good 
use even of expensive experiences, and it is a 
man of great wisdom who is able to gather and 
profit by the expensive experiences of others. 
— E. M. Pratt. 

The University of Minnesota has received a 
donation of $200,000 for the purpose of erecting 
a students' hospital. All sick students will be 
cared for here, and it will be great for the med- 
ical students in clinic work. 

Andrew Carnegie has given $25,000 toward 
the establishment of a fund of $ UK), 003 for the 
endowment of a chair of political economy at 
Western Reserve university. The chair will 
hear the name of the United States senator, 
Mark A. Manna. 

If you do your work well, your promotion 
and reward will take care of itself. But if you 
are continually threatening to strike or to quit 
your job, you are preparing yourself for Lhe 
fate you deserve — a swift informal graduation 
by the back-door route. — Ex. 

"In view of the fact that the United Stages 
refuses to graduate from West Point or Annap- 
olis men who are uaable to swira, no Cornell 
student will becredited *vith a passing mark for 
spring terra's drill who has not previously 
passed a satisfactory examination in swim- 
ming." This order, by Captain Barton, com- 
mandant of the cadets of Cornell University, 
practically makes swimming a requirement for 
graduation from Cornell.— .Ex. 



Franklins. 

The Franklins entertained themselves Satur- 
day evening with a social time. T.n fun 
started about 8:00 o'clock and lasted till the 
lights winked. Mr. Phinney and Miss P.att 
were declared the King and Queen of Hearts. 
Ira Brown was a pretty good shot with the 
bow and arrow. After partaking of punch and 
wafers the Franks, and friends adjourned till 
next time. 



2S2 



THE STUDENTS' HERALIX 




Motto: UtCitEHy 
One CvtTfv*Tt Hi» 
0w» (Jtwiia, -»-. 

Printed In College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-offlce at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 

Sin (fie copies, rive cents. 

F. A. Kibnb. Jr..*06 Editor-in-cbief 

Gbovkh Karl. *07 Business Manager 

E C Fakkah. W .-...Literary Editor 

L. E Gaston. "08 Local Editor 

S. W Cunningham. '08 Exchange Editor 

C. E. Whipple. *07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J, S. MoNTfioMRKY. '07 Subscription Manager 

Grace Haw kins, 'I* i . . ,„ ***,,**, 

A Q Phillips. '07 f Assoc. Local Editors 

Ku/.aukth Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

Jas. R. Coxkn. "08 Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
shou'd be bunir on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Eliza eibth Sweet. '04, alumni editor, will be triad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan. Kan., Feb. 15, 1906, 

The time is fast approaching when a new 
editorial force will be called upon to issue the 
Herald, and interest should center upon this 
most important matter. A college paper should 
have the support of every student in the school, 
and it can only reach a high level when a 
lively interest is shown in every phase of its 
endeavor. The editor wishes to take the read- 
ers and non-subscrihers of the Herald 
severely to task for their shortcomings during 
the past year. In doing so we acknowledge 
that we are not eminently fitted to issue a 
college paper; but the fact remains that little 
help or encouragement has been extended us in 
our efforts. To the present time almost half 
of the College subscribers and an equal pro- 
portion of those out of College have been on 
the red-marked list, and a constant notification 
has failed to bring a response. When by 
chance a copy has been missed by these same 
individuals they have been instantaneous in 
sending up a howl of remonstrance. There are 
many members on the board of instruction of 
the College who think that the College periodi- 
cals have no call for their heart v cooperation 
and support, even to a paltry subscription at 
one dollar per year. Students likewise attend 



"Buster Browns" and then when asked to 
subscribe to the College paper protest that 
they have no money and cannot afford to 
respond with cash. The Herald readers 
imagine that its editors have nothing to do but 
rake in the cash and then to distribute it with 
much pleasure among themselves. Each issue 
of the paper costs; many hours of thought and 
work and the income when all collected barely 
pays its bills, leaving little for salaries. The 
Herald's work is recompensed only by the 
varied experience which it brings to its editors 
and the opportunity it offers to engage in an 
occupation most pleasant when full apprecia- 
tion is given the effort. The paper is about to 
adopt a few policies which meet objection and 
criticism, and the editorial staff will be glad to 
debate the matter with any and all who are 
interested enough to discuss the different sub- 
jects. Further subscriptions will be solicited 
during the following weeks, and we would like 
to see every one who can possibly do so sub- 
scribe for the paper. We have room on our 
stockholder list for fifty or more members, and 
those who would like to shape the policy of the 
paper, to help materially in its success! 
should purchase these stocks, attend the meet- 
ing, and do hard work wherever opportunity 
offers. 

Baseball practice begins this week and will 
probably continue each day whenever the 
weather permits. It is desired to get the men 
together that they may limber up and show 
what material the management has to work 
upon. Every student who expects to try for 
the team should come out for a few minutes 
each day, especially the pitchers and catchers. 
An entirely new battery must be developed, and 
this will require long practice and hard work. 
Every player should devote himself constantly 
to his College work, for only faithful College 
workers can make successful College athletes. 
A poor student mi*y aid the team materially, 
but at the critical point he will be helpless be- 
side the less brilliant player but the more 
faithful student. This is not meant to dis- 
courage any prospective baseball player, but 
to encourage each to enter with serious purpose 
and firm determination. A losing team may 
not always be an unsuccessful team, but it is 
better to have won, and a winning team is 
worth the hardest effort of each individual. 

It is going the rounds that cheating is be- 
coming of common occurrence during examina- 
tions, or at least more open and above-board 
than ever before. We heartily detest the man 
who would thus take advantage of an instruct- 
or, for he proves himself a traitor to trust 



m 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



283 



and one unworthy of a voice in his own gov- 
ernment. It is nothing to the instructor except 
in so far as an unworthy student reflects din- 
credit upon the professor who passes him in a 
study. A sneak and cheat in College goes out 
to betray the trust imposed on him by men in 
the world, thus swelling the number of items 
which come before our eyes and make us turn 
in disgust from the pages of a daily paper. 
A student especially should rise above such 
little meannesses and cultivate the soul of 
honor, for upon him turn the most critical 
eyes. Everything he does and says in his 
home and his College will be carried into the 
circle of this criticism, and all will be rated se- 
verely if he falls short in any one particular. 
Honesty is the best policy, and this truth will 
develop itself in the experience of every man. 



lonians. 

President Laura Lyman called the society to 
order Saturday and presided during the first 
part of the session* after which Vice-President 
Odessa Dow took charge. 

Our first number on the program was music, 
by Nora Frazure. furnished by Edna Jones, 
and next Marie Bardshar tested our knowledge 
of "Roberts' Rules of Order." The panto- 
mime, "Oorain' thro' the Rye, " given by Daisy 
Harner, was excellent. Then Marian Van Lieu 
reviewed the book, "A Jayhawker Abroad," 
in an interesting manner. Miss Hal lie Smith 
was introduced to the society and rendered a 
pleasing piano solo. The "Oracle," edited by 
Blanche Robertson, contained many interest- 
ing and well-written articles. This was one of 
the best "Oracl *s" we have had for some time. 
Seven new members were taken into the society. 

Business session was good, and after listen- 
ing to the critic's report we adjourned. E. B. 



Alpha Beta*. 

We "fell in" at "Capt. " Wendel's com- 
mand, shortly after two, and, after singing 
and devotion, admitted two recruits, Messrs. 
Broom and Adams. Allen Phillips then gave 
us an illustrated talk on Cupid's doings in our 
society and elsewhere. Gaston, with a subject 
too long to be given here, told us of the comic 
valentine, with illustrations directed at various 
society members. Two splendid vocal solos 
were given by outsiders, one by Miss Fanny 
Johnson, the other by Miss Helen Sweet. A 
short "Gleaner" by Mr. Gore, and a song by 
Garver, with pantomime accompaniment by 
McKee and Sullivan, followed. 

After recess and a short business session, 
during which we agreed to try our luck on the 
ice that ey ening , . we ad journed, _ - 0* W... 



X Knockers' Corner 2C 

Have you tried to get into the Library on 
any recent Monday morning? If you have tried 
to do so, you have probably had to wait until 
about 10:00 o'clock, or such other time as the 
people in charge see fit to open the doors. It 
seems strange that the Library should be kept 
closed a large part of the forenoon on this day, 
when a student has the most time to study. 
Many students have no time during the week 
to go to the Library, and on Monday, when 
they do have time, it is necessary to waste a 
couole of hours waiting for the dOors to open. 
Of course, the librarians may have some work 
to do that would ha hindered by a lot of noisy 
students, but then it would seem that these 
same students are deserving of some con- 
sideration. . 

College Locals, 

Professor TenEyck is attending an institute 
on the Santa Fe farm institute series this week. 

It is rumored that "Legs" Thurston ate up 
all the Y. W. profits on the peanuts last Mon- 
day. 

The Printing Department received a new im- 
posing stone and a small quantity of new type 
last week. 

One of the first years at the Dormitory sleeps 
each night with a picture of the "fair one" un- 
der his pillow. 

The new cases that were being built in the 
museum are finished, and part of the "snakes" 
are on exhibition. 

L. M. Bourbon, freshman, who left College 
last mid -term on account of his eyesight, re- 
turned last week and resumed his College work. 

Topping says that he saw the eclipse of the 
moon last Thursday evening, and that it was 
not very late either. Question: Guess where 
Top was? 

Last Saturday evening about sixty Alpha 
Betas drove out to the Wildcat and spent the 
evening skating, and telling stories around a 
large bon-fire, as they popped corn. Aftsr va- 
rious experiences with a refractory wagon tire, 
they reached home during the small hours of 
the morning. 

The sophomores gave a reception to them- 
selves in the Gymnasium Monday evening. 
Each one present was a "Faculty" or a member 
of a "Faculty" family. Refreshments of sand- 
wiches, ice-cream, cake and punch were served 
shortly before the lights "winked" and told 
them that they had to go home in the rain t . 



284 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 






■ 

f 




A. J. Reed visited his home in Smith county 
over Sunday. 

H. T. Codding, freshman, left for his home 
in Wamego last Saturday. 

The Y. W. C. A. yirls did a pood husiness 
last Monday at the King Candy Kitchen. 

Mrs. J. T. Willard visited at her old home, 
near E^kridge, last Saturday and Sunday. 

Several skating parties Monday evening- 
were called off early on account of the rain. 

A numher of the prominent junior engineers 
spend their Sundays in writing up their '"Lab.'* 
notes. 

F. P. Evans, of Waldo, Kan., visited his 
two sons here in College for a couple of days 
last we/k. 

George Gasser, '05, was seriously injured by 
falling from a three-story building at Ft. Riley, 
last week. 

Assistant Melick left Tuesdav for Chicago to 
attend the National Dairy Show. He will re- 
turn Sunday. 

The Herald reporter is knocking because he 
has not been invited to the Roosevelt-Long- 
worlh wedding. 

Several hoys ara raising money to huv mail- 
carrier Smith a curry -comb. We sincerely 
hope that lie will use it. 

Guy Crise, who is attending St. Marv's 
Academy, was visiting his parents in Manhat- 
tan Saturday and Sunday. 

The Ionian and Websier societies voted to 
give tin Herald the four dollars per term, for 
which we are duly grateful. 

There seems to be a graat demand for White 
Legnorn e^n just now. The poultry depart- 
ment is making some money. 

R ^member fcba first of the cross-countrv runs 
next Saturday. Everybody should be out to 
see the start, and also the finish. 

The small modsl of ths College Dairv Hall 
has been sent to Chicago. It will be covered 
with butter and put on exhibition 

According to last we-k's BepubHc, John 
Hicks, the original of Owen Wister's " Virgin- 
ian," was formerly a student lure. 

Tae basket-ball game with Friends Univer- 
sity has been called off. This is the seond 
time they have broken a contract with us. 

Tae College will send a dozen bottles of milk 
to Caieago to compete for the prize in the 
CM-t'fiid milk contest. All pure milk plants 
will compete. r 



Glenn Buckman. Glenn Murphy and V. H, 
Berke.v were the delegates to the Strati Y. M. 
C. A. convention at Chanute last week. They 
returned Monday. 

Doctor Schoenleb^r expects to attend the 
second annual meeting of the Missouri Valley 
Veterinarian Association, held in Kansas City, 
February 12 to 14. 

Heard in obpct-drawing class: Miss Weeks. 
—"What would a man see if he fell from a 
stpp-ladder to the floor?" Earle Thurston — 
"Mostly stars, I guess." 

Governor A. E Mead, of Washington, who 
spoke in chapel last Saturday, is a former re- 
sident of » anhattan. He expects to return 
here sometime in the near future. 

The Union meeting's conducted by the minis- 
ters of the city are baififf held at the Methodist 
church this week and will end with services in 
the City Auditorium Sunday evening. 

An application has bean made for a new 
lease for t'ie Athletic Park. If it is secured, 
steps will b3 taken toward th3 construction of 
a new grand-stand and dressing-room. 

Baseball practice started Tuesday. Coach 
Ahearn is working to develop some new pitch- 
ers and a catcher. Two infield positions, one 
outfield position and the pitcher and catcher 
positions are open to new men. 

Complimentary remarks on the appearance 
of the brush-strewn campus are in order. 
Janitor Lewis might pile the old broken seats 
and chairs around the paths. This with the 
ex-Christmas trees and brush piles would be a 
"thing of beauty and a joy forever." As near 
as we can figure out, the purpose of th'se 
brush piles, etc., is to keep the "Hort" colt off 
the cmder paths. 

The Witches entertained the Phi Kappa Phis 
with a chafing-dish party last Saturdtv eve- 
ning, at Doctor Cave's residence, 529 Pierre 
street. A most unique means of entertainment 
was provided in an "Alice Roosevelt" wed- 
ding, in which all present participated. The 
members of Phi Kappa Phi are : Misses Spohr, 
LU1. I ram, Smith. Harner, Washington, 
Venard, Fleming, Marty, Bess Sweet, and 
Florence Sweet. Witches: Misses Apitz Bir- 
key. West, Howell, Biddison, Hughes, and 

Some of the students have hsm desirous of 
gaining information as to why the Hort. colt is 

u }3Ei t0 Walk ™rl *■ Allege campus, and the 
students are not. The only reason to he given 

™ ^l^° im stu ' ien S s d0 no " »P*ar to have 
as much sense as the colt. Tin colt never 
walks in the same place twice. Besides this 

lZZ h l u St[i a b . ab * an(l a member of the 
cradle roll it is hoped that no College stu- 
den is in the sam3 class. But taking It seri- 
al uJ2 d ° e i a perSOn ™ ke h ? ^"!ng 
across lawns and wearing out the grass v rf ft 

cent° ^n V h ( tlm '' aDd VaIuin * y° ul * '"»* at 50 
se"fwMi . U >\u lt Wnnh as mm ' h a < the^ra^s 

camnus fc w ftM"" 1 and help make our 
Jiuu? if bis lot>king one in the State. It 
will be, if we will only obey this regulation. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



285 



Are you a "Rounder?" 

Percy Roberts was sick in bed last week. 

How many valentines did the kind professors 
send youV 

W. E. Tannebie is imprisoned in the In s »ital 
with pneumonia. 

Assistant Scheffer was initiated into the 
Round -rs' society Friday. 

The *• Bargain Counter" Male Quartet had 
its picture takea last weak. 

E. E. Yaggy, of Hutchinson, visited the 
Hurt. Department last week. 

Miss Lula Drake is out of College and at the 
ho.spkal on account of sickness. 

The Domestic Art Department expects to give 
an exhibition at the clo.->e of this term. 

M. D. Snodgrass. who has been seriously ill 
for the past week, is improving rapidly. 

Assistant Eastman has been called home on 
account of the serious illness of his brother. 

Coach Ahearn will coach the basket-ball boys 
this week, during the absence of Coach Melick. 

Contrary to all traditions and customs, the 
Herald will have no mid-term jokes this 
week. 

The assistant and Faculty ladies basket-ball 
team practised for the first time Saturday after- 
noon. 

Miss Mary Lee, librarian at the Carn3gie li- 
brary, was sight-seeing around College last 
Friday. 

Miss Gertrude Stump will sin,' "My Father 
Bids Me Come" in chapel next Saturday 
morning. 

Fisher, the pantatorium man, wants to see 
all the hoys this week. Give him a trial. Just 
west of Coops. 

L. B. Streeter went hom3 Saturday to re- 
cover from the effects of mid-term. He re- 
turned Monday. 

The political pot in Riley county has com- 
menced to simmer and promises to boil fiercely 
in the near future. 

Homer Hillman has discovered a new vacuum 
and intends to have it patented. It was not in 
his head this time. 

Assistant Ridenour was unable to be at 
College the first of the week on account of an 
attack of tonsillitis. 

Professor Kamraeyer's first-hour public 
speaking class sent him a large bouquet of 
carnations last week. 

Those who visit the Herald office and read 
"copy" on the editorial hooks are in danger 
of getting their 4 " horns" sawed off. 

The College band expects to go to Wamego 
on February 21, and to Wakefield on the 21. 
They will give a concert at each place. 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering 
is remodeling one of the traction -engines for 
use as a steam-roller on the oil and College 
roads. 



Professor Kammeyer was out of College last 
week on account of sickness. Hi was suffering 
from a complication of grippe and malaria. 

The Farm Department has been sending out 
seed to the farmers over the State who are co- 
operating with the Station in sonu variety tests 
for different localities. 

The Choral Union has placed 3000 tickets to 
its concert on sale. Please remember that the 
Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. each receive 
one-third of the profits. 

Miss Harriet Parkers on gave a valentine 
party at her pleasant, home on College Hill last 
night. Games and refreshments suitable to the 
occasion were the order of the evening. 

Don't forget the first cross-country run of the 
season will start at 4 P. M. next Saturday »t 
Carver's corner. If the weather interferes, 
announcement will be made on the bulletin 
board. 

The staff of the "Ag." Review) are on the 
warpath. They are knocking on the people 
who mutilate their exchange file and use their 
office as a study room. 

Warren R. Boyd, formerly an M>7, was in 
towu on business last Saturday. He is now 
owner and editor of The News, at AthoL Kan. 
He got his literary start as local editor of the 
Herald. 

Several members of the Faculty have bought 
some ground on Eleventh street, south of 
Ingra ham's and west of the park. It will be 
called the Faculty Row. Now students, watch 
out for some fine landscape gardening. 

The Peterson sisters and Mr. A. R ly Cond't, 
of the Midland L\eeum Bureau, stopped he- 
tween trains on their way to Riley Saturday, 
wh »r«§ they gave a concert in the evening. 
Tney were'about College with Mr. McLean. 

Ths corn -judging contest for the Fielding 
tropny will be held this y >ar sometime about 
March first. It was won last year hy the second - 
vear short-course class, and each cla>s should 
plan to be well represented. Other prizes for 
individual work will be given. 

Several senior girls went to Topeka Wednes- 
day of last week, to take the civil service ex- 
am'ina ion. The enjoyment of the trip was 
much increased hy a visit with v iss Margaret 
Haggart, '05, who resides in that city. Those 
who went were Misses Bo line Hanson, Mattie 
Pittman, Grace Allingham, and Alma McRae. 

The U. S. Department of Agriculture, in con- 
nection with the Kansas Experiment Station, is 
planning to establish a cooperative station at 
Garden City. Professor Ten Eyck, of the Farm 
D *pait;neut here, and Profs. M. A. Carlton and 
E. C. Chilcott, of the Department of Agricul- 
ture, are to have charge of the woi-k. 

Professor Ten Eyck attended an institute held 
at Arkansas Ciiy last week. A students' corn- 
judging contest was held in which twenty-two 
hoi's took part. The interesting part of the 
contest lav in the fact that ex-College students 
won t.ie contest. H. L. Bernett was first in th i 
contest, Ravmnnd Raraage was second, and 
Warren Griffith was third. Toil certainly 
speaks well for the Farm Department. 



286 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




l NEW H ATS g 



NEW GOODS 
ARRIVING NOW 



STUDENTS, we are making great preparations for you this sDrinsr 
We appreciate your patronage, and will soon be in shape to show 
of the nobbiest assortments of Toggery ever offered. :: :: 



you one 



Meet our 
Tailor 



JOHN COONS, of Course "Z£r 



The hand goes to Wakefield on the 27th of 
this month to give a concert. 

One of the hoys in projection drawing is verv 
fond of ink as a beverage. Hi feeds himself 
with a pen. 

The new granary is almost finished. It im- 
proves the appearance of that side of the 
campus in a noticeable manner. 

Mrs. W. T. Bolton, of Denver, visited her 
cousin, D. H. Gripton, for a few days last 
week. She was on her way home from a visit 
in Texas. 

Corduroy trousers are alt the go at the 
Missouri Agricultural College. Every Ag. 
student wears them as an insignia of the course 
he is taking. 

The canvass for company to the junior-senior 
reception was the most strenuous ever yet 
known. It is reported that several seniors got 
it *'in the neck" as many as four times. 

Some of the students wish that the Faculty 
would install an extra bell in the south east 
corner of the upstairs of the Main building, so 
that the classes will not be held fifteen minutes 
overtime. 

A new smoke-stack 125 feet in height will be 
built in the spring. It will be located on the 
west side of the boiler-house and will be used 
for the boilers on that side. The old one wilt 
remain in use. 

"Jlcmlvedi That we endorse the movements now 
on foot to modify the rules of football to make 
the game less brutal and dangerous." This is 
the resolution that the Regents passed, and the 
only action tuked in regard to footbath 

One student became so homesick when he 
heard the Websters' '"Early Morning on the 
Farm," last Saturday evening, that it required 
a.i hour and a half for his friends to convince 
him to stay in College. He wanted to leave 
Sunday morning. 

'I'heY. M. C. A. has* twenty-nin3 classes in 
Bible study this term, with an enrolment of 
.-WO. The short-course men take up with this 
work more readily than the average student. 
The two largest classes are composed entirely 
of short-course men. One class of twelve is 
composed of colored men, with Mr. Glass as 
leader. Every colored man in College is tak- 
ing Bible study. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Emma Lane, freshman student about *03, is 
m the Deaconess Training school in San 
B rancisco. 

Mamie Helder, 04, who is spending the win- 
ter at her home in Manhattan, was about Col- 
lege one day last week. 

A. I. Bain, '00, was in town between trains 
last Friday, on his way from western Kansas 
to his home in Marshall county. 

John G. Missildine, special student last year, 
is a student in the Southwest Kansas College, 
at Winfield, and is teaching botany and bac- 
teriology there. 

.Tames Johnson, '05, and A. J. Rhoades, '05, 

are back in College this term, taking special 
work on telephones, preparatory to jfoin** to 
work for the Santa Fe R. R. 

Capt. J. G. Harbord, '8o\ chief of the constab- 
ulary department of the Philippine Inlands, 
writes that after seven months in the tropics he 
hopes to reach the States and his alma mater 
by a European route some time in the spring. 
He mentions just having met O. G. Palmer, '87, 
who is a lieutenant in the regular army. 

A number of students attended the K. N. G. 

ball last ni^ht. 

^ e P ( !l le T? G l ee Club win * ive » concert at 
Wakefield, March 16. 

''Professor" Charles Sherman had a bad 
cold and was unable to meet his music class 
last week. . 

Arba Ferris is busy picking junior stings out 
of Pat Brown these days. Most of the stints 
are located in the neck. 

F. A. and Mabel (Howe) Myers, students 
here in OR are rejoicing over ttu birth of a 
son and heir. He da;es from January 21. 

The students of Washington county have a 
well-organized club and meet everv week.. 
lney expect to have a souvenir book published. 

Rumor says that nothing happened when the 
lights went out at the lecture the other n ght. 
Mr. L^wis had order* to keep a sharp lookout. 



THE STUDENTS' HBR ALD 



College Campus Restaurant 

Oysters 25 cents. 

ChiUi 15 cents. 

Beef Soup 15 cents. 

CONFECTIONARY, SHORT ORDERS. ETC. 

CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors. 



NEW AND 2«T 
SCHOOL BOOKS 



SPECTACLES 



R. E. LOFINCK I gql s d pe p c e t n a s c 

DIAMONDS 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA, 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, No- 
tions and Sporting Goods. 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



PHOFESSIOSA L, 
DK. G. A. CKIMS, DKNTIST. 



34 vears of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 

1>K. J. K.TAYI.OIC, UKXTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
(told work a specialty. Fbone 187. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

I>rs Colt & Cave. 



Office In Union Natl. 
Bank Bid*.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormlck, Dentist 

Room 18. Union National Bank Building 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 
It will do you good 



r 



i 



The Y. W. C A. will 
have a Special Valen- 
tine sale, Monday, Feb- 
ruary 12, at 



Orr's 



STUDIO is the place to get 

PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: :: 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

THE HERALD 

$1 per year, 



STUDENTS, 

GET YOUR 



WOOD 



of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. B^st quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

nUAlUr £* MANHATTAN, KAN. 

!' nUIlL U T08 H. THIRD »T. 



K 



ING'S 
ANDY 
ITCHEN 



The girls will have full charge, and the Y. 
W. C. A. will receive all the profits on box 
candies and peanuts. Buy your friend a box 
of candy for a Valentine. 

10 per cent discount on all sales. 



I 



I 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



WHERE! WHERE! 



WHERE! 

Don tU: t ST Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

You can get anything along College supplies that you want? 



FINEST LOT OF STMl IONERY IN TOAa£N 

We represent a student organization, and we want the students' trade. 

We also handle * WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PENS 



It is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Fted, S.eds& Fuel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, ilgr. 

AUingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 

THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo* T, Fielding 8r Sons, 



SEEDS 



Office 11345 N. Second St. 



GASOLINE STOVES 



Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable UoikK Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 



AT 



ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALt-R IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

THE HERALD 

$1 PER YEAR. 






Comto'.iJii Key Ring, 

Key Tag, Cigar Cutter, 

and Pocket Screw Driver. 







NICKEL PLATED. 



*| fir* R-member, you get the v hole 
1 "ti ^ing for tOc., Key I i g. a. d 
all. A good K-y Ping cosu from 5 to 
13c., t'.i C\g\rCu*S'zh evi y wo; h £:c, 
aid lh-> Pocket Screw I liver is tlore 
wori'i Li2 p.*i a of the en i.'e coir Li aticn. 
O.i t p of all this v*« throw i.» the Kane 
Ta3- II y u w 3t Ui to s'arr.p your r£rre 
and add e33 oi tha Taj we vwl! c"o fo h r 
1 )c. extra. "ThireguLr priVe fc.rlhbi.lcrc 
is 2>c. Most people have th*m rterr.pcd 
s i tSat if keys are lost they v i 1 te rt turwd 
t) t!ia owner. Some don't car** Ij h^vo 
tiem stamped. We furni-h them ci h t 
way. If your dealer doesn't handle them 
you can get them from 

The Taylor Mfg. Co., 

S A: M3dafa:toren, HARTFORD, CONN. 






Lr. 



We make all our own 

.•Candies.. 

Best Chocolates* Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :; 




Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
r IGE CREAM SODAS 



. 



■»< 




« 



H you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and' 
doubtless know that you do. <J If so, don't make me 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring* Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
<& Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another sue months, particularly while butter values are highest <J Buy 
your separator NOW; and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of aQ farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

an" Canal SU 

C PHILADELPHIA 

•-lira Filbert straws 3 

•ass rwAncmco 

and 11 Drumm Street. 



/ — 



General Offices: 
74 Cortiandt Street 

NEW YORK 



111 YouvUle Square 

TORONTO 
and rr York Street 

WINNIPEG 

A venae 



"v 



i 






ffrjfetffl^"- ^ ■ r ',-. ■ .. - , 



J 



i 



I 



»»»XXX»!!r»»^»K'<HH»«!r»^^^^H»H«IMMIM18» 



2 
* 

2 
2 
2 

2) 



W. S. ELLIOT 










Students* Corduroy Trousers 
Yale Pattern, The Very 
Latest. -:- Price, $4.00 










IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING * ~ 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X, X 

312 POYNTZ AVENUE, :: MANHATTAN, KAN. 



m 



/ 



*&&&&m&i&S&£^WCi^^ 



The Big Racked 



2 
2 

% 
| 

2 
2 

% 
i 

2 

% 
I 

% 



Stationery, Pencils, Note-books, 
Tablets, Pens and Ink, Photo 
Supplies, Room Furnishings 

Now is the time to Buy Winter Underwear, 

Hosiery and Knit Goods, AS WE HAVE 

MADE PRICES ON THESE GOODS TO 
CLEAN THEM OUT. 



■ ■ 

■ > 



i 

I 

* 

* 

* 



*$0*?i«?(?a*?a^«?(%^$(?(?(«90*^^$(?(^$^ 



I 



3Che Students' Herald 



by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 





















■»< 



*m 



UNITED STATES SEPARATOR 

Continues to Lead 

At Maine State Dairyman's Convention, December, 1905, there were 

91 entries of butter In all Classes. 



i 



l 



42 per cent of all the entries made from U. S. Separator Cream. < 
30 per cent of all the entries made from DeLaval Separator Cream. 
38 per cent of all the entries made from 5 or 6 other methods, 
9 Entries of the Creamery Class the U. S. average score was 94.8. 
9 Entries, of the Creamery Class the De Laval average score was 94.3. 
30 Entries of the Dairy Class the U. S. average score was 93.9. 
9 Entries of the Dairy Class the DeLaval average score was 93.5. 
The average score of all entries in all Classes was 94. 

DAIRY SWEEPSTAKES, UNITED STATES 5C0RE, 97 3-4. Out of 13 prizes 

awarded, 7 went to United States Butter and only 2 to the DeLavel. The United States 
Separator averages to lead in quality of product as well as thoroughness of separa- 
tion. Send for phamphlets describing Uuited States Cream Separator. 



I 



Vermont Farm Machine Co. 



!. 



Bellows Falls, 




L 



If you are troubled with headaches, 
eye-aches or have trouble in reading, 
stop at Askren's, The Optician, who 
guarantees to cure these defects or it 
costs you nothing. We use no drugs 
or medicine of any kind. Absolute 
satisfaction guaranteed. :: :: :: :: 

XASKREN^ 

THE GRADUATE OPTICIAN 






VeFmont 



I 




Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Buses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage Una. 

Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for class 
parties, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: :: :: :: :: :: 



PHONE 65 



H. I. Barnhoust 



L W. Phillips 






'^- ' — — — - 



■-*^«*-- 



•isssssssl 



mm 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



289 



SENIORS 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photo** 
graphs made. You 
feel better, so do we. 



Wolf's Studio 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NG'S 

The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of clears and toilet 
articles. Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Bulldinsr. 

Porcetainbath tabs tine tineclgmrs*nd toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. " En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS Si. 00 

302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop. 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Walt for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



- GO TO 

fl. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 

offer you only the best X X 

W. M. STEMGLEY & CO. 



290 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



IT WILL, PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




New Goods 

Are you going to have 
an all-over embroidered 
waist? They are swell. 
We are showing a nice as- 
sortment of all-over em- 
broidery at the right 
prices. Spring stock of 
Laces, Embroideries, Cor- 
set-cover Embroidery, 
White Goods, Linens for 
waists and suits, Sheer 



White Goods, Ginghams, 
Cheviots, Fancy Linens 
and Printed Jacquards, 
Chambrays, Royal Wor- 
cester ( orsets. Muslin 
Underwear, Ladies' Suits 
and Skirts. McCall Pat- 
terns, 10 cents and 15 
cents, none higher. Shoes 
and Rubbers, 10 per cent 
discount on all Shoes this 
month. Keen Kutter 
Goods. Pocket-knives, 



Razors, Shears, Scissors, 
Saws, Axes, Eldge Tools, 
Stoves and Ranges, 
Wilson's Improved Air- 
tight Heaters. Staple and 
Fancy Groceries, Oranges, 
Bananas, Lemons and Ap- 
ples. Murdock's Heel a 
Coffee, Murdock's Nectar 
Coffee, Murdock's Club 
Coffee. O. P. T. Extracts. 
Money back if not satis- 
factory. 



We deliver goods promptly to any' part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, cte. 

Phone 87 for Dry -Goon's, Heady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



CALL AT 



The LEADER 




And buy your Overshoes, 
Comforts, Blankets, at 10 
per cent discount, and 
Underwear 10 to 20 per 
cent off. :: :: :: 

While there, ask to see 
their nice, large stock of 

Full Vamp Shoes 



PROFESSION A L. 



Dlt. G. A. CICISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DB. J. E. TAYLOlt, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Hank Building. Fine 
trold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone. Colt :t08 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Dn. Colt & Cave. 



Office in Union Natl. 
BankBldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 




Prices Always Right 



-j 



Office phone 411 






House phone 377 


Dr. 


H. 


G. 


McCormick, 


Dentist 


Room 16. 


1 "'. 




Union National Bank Building 



Subscribe for 



THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 




Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., February 22, 1906; 



Number 22 



Junior-Senior Reception* 

At 8:15 o'clock last Wednesday evening* the 
senior class received the juniors. To say that 
it was done in a royal manner is expressing* it 
rather mildly. Any old feeling which might 
ever have existed between the two classes was 
laid away for the time being, and every one 
met as friend and classmate. 

As we entered the domestic science hall on 
St. Valentine's night, the first thing that at- 
tracted our attention was the beautiful decora- 
tions. On the left as one entered could be seen 
the interior of a room neatly decorated with '07 
pennants and colors, while upon the opposite 
side of the hall the door opened into a room 
artistically adorned with the orange and white 
of the '06 class. The wide hall was also very 
beautifully arranged, and from the number of 
hearts in evidence one could not but think that 
for once, at least, Cupid was to be given a fair 
show. To add to this inspiring scene the sound 
of music could be heard from a secluded corner 
of the main room. 

The first thing- after the finding of partners 
for the evening was a piano solo by Miss Lor a 
Perry, followed immediately by a violin solo 
by Master Erudop, which very much delighted 
all those present. Miss Worden then gave a 
reading, in her pleasing manner, which con- 
sisted of everything from the "Charge of the 
Light Brigade" down to the melancholy hum 
of the washer-woman on the back porch of a 
Monday morning. Miss Perry again delighted 
the assembly with a piano solo. We were then 
introduced to Miss Golden, who gave a read- 
ing, which was certainly enjoyed. It seemed 
to be very appropriate for the occasion, for 
we were again reminded that this was "Walen- 
tine's Niffht." 

At this time we were informed that a large 
number of small hearts had been hidden around 
the room, and we all proceeded at once to the 



hunt. Miss Foster, having found the greatest 
number, was awarded the grand prize. Joe 
Montgomery had no trouble in convincing the 
judges of his complete un worthiness and was 
forthwith awarded the booby prize. 

Refreshments were then served, and the only 
kick we have coming here was that P. E. Brown 
and R. A. Cassel seemed to have freer access 
than the rest of us. However, we will heed the 
gentle admonition given us by these same 
seniors and "not get sore," for they probably 
deserved it. 

Mr. James Cheney now called the joint as- 
sembly s to order and introduced Mr. C. E. 
Davis as toast-master for the senior class. 
Mr. Davis decidedly upheld his reputation as 
an orator and speaker and offered a toast 
which was indeed a treat to all who had the 
pleasure of hearing him. He reminded us of 
times when things were not as they seemed now, 
and we were more than ever convinced that the 
senior class are not quite so bad as we had 
tried to make them out to be. The response 
for the juniors was given by C. E. Whipple. 
He acknowledged the "marvelous" wisdom of 
the seniors, told a parrot story, and in behalf 
of the '07 class, expressed his appreciation of 
the '06s for their kind hospitality. 

Miss Lyman then spent a few moments in 
making certain juniors hold their breath for 
fear they might get "stung." However, Miss 
Lyman's roasts were very well received and 
certainly enjoyed by all juniors. 

Miss Westgate amply fulfilled our fondest 
hopes, and the way "My Son John" and others 
were roasted is still fresh in our memories. 

Each person was given a heart to take home 
as a souvenir. Surely the juniors are not 
prone to forget St. Valentine's night, February 
14, 1906, for upon that memorable occasion we 
were so pleasantly entertained by the senior 
class. A. Junior. 



292 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Athletic Notes. 

The men for the track team are showing up 
in good shape, especially the runners. Thurs- 
ton, Hastings, Milllgan and Warren are all 
doing work oh the road, while a number of fel- 
lows are practicing at jumping, putting ,the ' 
shot, and pole-vaulting. 

It is hoped that every fellow who expects to 
make the baseball team will get out as soon as 
possible and start to work. It is the fellow 
that gets out early, works hard and listens to 
the coach that will be one of the chosen few 
who will represent K. A. C. on the diamond. 

General Manager Dean has arranged three 
meets for our track team next spring. One 
will be held with Washburn on our grounds; 
another date will probably be arranged for 
later. On May 25, the team will go to Emporia 
to contest with the State Normal. On the 26th 
it will meet the College of Emporia team. 

At a meeting held in Topeka, last Saturday, 
at which the general managers of athletics of 
the various Kansas colleges were present, it 
was decided to hold an annual inter-collegiate 
track meet. The first one will 'take place at 
Topeka, during the first week of May. Most 
of the Kansas colleges, with the possible ex- 
ception of K. U., will take part in this meet. 
The gate receipts will be used to pay the expen- 
ses of each team and any surplus that may re- 
main, will be divided among the different 
teams. The schools that have signified their 
intention of entering teams in the meet are: 
State Normal, College of Emporia, St. Mary's 
College, Fairmount College, Baker University, 
Washburn College, Ottawa University, and K. 
S. A. C. Other schools may enter later. 



Russel Cave, accompanied by his • sister, and 
Carl Kipp, accompanied by Miss Amos, both 
sang for us. Miss Kahl and Mr. Seng, ac- 
companied by Miss Lane, drowned our sorrows 
in some of the best violin music to which the 
walls* have ever echoed. Talking, too, of 
banjo music, Miss Martin not Only made us 
hear it, but nearly made us see it as we.ll. 

After a pretty good business session we 
"piked." $ M - J - 

Said the shoe to the stocking 

"I will wear a hole In-you." 
Said the stocking to the shoe: 

"I'll tie dartied if you do.' — Ex. 

Football Prospects. 

Contrary to a number of reports that have 
been circulated, the College will have a football 
team next fall, and it will equal or surpass the 
record made by the '05 team. General Manager 
Dean has been working on a schedule and he 
has made two-year contracts with K. U. and 
K. S. N. The first game with K. U. will take 
place here on November 24. The game with 
K. S. N. is played at'Emporia on Thanksgiv- 
ing day. Games to be played here have also 
been arranged with the College of Emporia and 
Fairmount College. 



Webster*. 

The program was given almost entirely by 
new members, and, while not as good as some 
of our programs, it showed that we have a 
"good lot of willing workers. Kirk was there 
at the start this time to begin us aright. Con- 
ner led in devotion and the program com- 
menced. 

Getty, with a magazine review, Marron, with 
some anecdotes distorted from a recitation, 
Milligan, with an impersonation, and the two 
Shulers, were the new men who appeared 
for the first time. Stauffer's play, in which he 
tried to hire a hand, ended well for the willing 
semi-dutchman, but Conwell will no doubt lose 
his credits in German. Putnam showed us 
something startling in the musical realm, and 
Walker read a first-class "Reporter." 
Of music, we had, as usual, the best kind. 



K W. C. A. 

Cora McNutt leads the meeting Saturday on 
"The Responsibilities of the Association 
Girl." All girls are invited to come. ' 

Miss Thayer left Monday for Oklahoma, 
where she goes' to preside at the Okla. Terri- 
torial Convention. She will be gone for about 
ten days. 

The topic for the last Saturday npon meet- 
ing, "Not Ashamed of Christ," was well 
brought out by the leader, Miss Thayer. The 
attendance was unusually good. 



Eurodetphians. 

On account of the absence of President Boline 
Hanson, Vice-president Tillie Harold presided 
at the meeting of the Euro's., Saturday. The 
following numbers were given: 

Vocal solo by Tillie Kammeyer; select read- 
ing, Alice Marvin; vocal solo, Allen Cooper; 
question box, Elizabeth Randall; piano solo, 
Tillie Kammeyer. The program closed with a 
novelty number by Mr. E. C. Whipple and Mr. 
Earl Thurston, in which all the striking fea- 
tures of Mr. Thurston's weird story of the des- 
ert were wonderfully emphasized by Mr. Whip- 
ple's accompaniment at the piano. Every one 
enjoyed the encore by Mr. Whipple, in which 
he rendered "Little Boy Blue" in a very in- 
teresting manner. : ' . ; . 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Ionian Alumni. 

The Ionian alumni girls met for the first time 
at the home of Anna O' Daniel last Monday 
evening. About twenty graduate members were 
present and elected as officers, {Catherine Win- 
ter, '01, president; Mamie Helder, '04, vice- 
president; Grace Allingham, '04, secretary 
and treasurer. Sarah Hougham, '03, Alice 
Ross, '03, Emilie Pfuetze, '08, Blanche Stevens, 
'05, and Elizabeth Sweet, '04, were appointed 
as a committee to draw up a constitution. The 
next meeting will be at the home of Mamie 
Helder, the evening of February 26. 



Another Reply to "Hayne. '* . 

A knock which" appeared last week in the 
Herald, though showing nothing objection- 
able in the writer's intentions, deserves an an- 
swer in explanation. It seems that in the dis- 
position of janitor work, the Library is treated 
to a thorough cleaning on Monday morning 
and that the time from 7 until 10 o'clock is 
barely sufficient to complete the work of wash- 
ing, sweeping and dusting. This information 
comes from one in authority not with the inten- 
tion of backbiting any interested person but to 
show that the Library Department is doing the 
best that can be done under the circumstances. 



Y. M. C. A. Banquet 

The third annual banquet of the Y. M. C. A. 
was held Monday evening in the parlors of the 
Congregational church. Over one hundred 
members, in addition to about twenty invited 
guests, partook of the excellent meal prepared 
by the ladies. Every one seemed to enjoy both 
the company and the food, and each appeared 
to be glad that he was a member of this fore- 
most student organization. 

Professor TenEyck acted as chairman for 
the evening and introduced the various speak- 
ers. The first of these was A. D. Hollo way, 
who spoke on "The Social Side of the Asso- 
ciation." Rev. O. B. Thurston followed by 
telling of ^'The Relation of the Association to 
the Church." Mr. C. E. Whipple spoke of the 
second side of the Y. M. C. A.— the physical 
side. His subject was "The Athletic Side of 
the Association." D, H. Gripton told of the 
third part of the Association's work — "The 
Religious Side." President Nichols gave an 
interesting talk on "What the Faculty Thinks 
of the Association." 

Mr. James Dukelow, a fruit raiser of Hutch- 
inson, Kan., and Mr. John Dadisman, the 
State college Y. M. C. A. secretary, each gave 
an interesting talk, telling of the good to be 
derived from an active participation in Y. M. 
C. A. work. 



293 



Nebraska S3 College IS. 

To say that the Nebraska University basket- 
ball team had an easy time, in winning from 
our boys Monday evening, would be putting it 
mildly. They won without any trouble, for 
they played fast and used fine team-work. 
Their reputation also helped them to win, as 
the College boys seemed to think that they had 
no chance whatever against the so-called 
"world's champions." No one expected our 
team to win, or even to more than hold the 
visitors to a comparatively small score, but 
very few expected such a one-sided game. The 
chief trouble with the College team was their 
lack of team-work and their inability to hold 
the ball. They also seemed to be afflicted with 
stage-fright and missed a number of excellent 
chances to throw goals. 

The Nebraska players all did good work, 
but they were inclined to play dirty. They 
were penalized time after time for their rough 
work, but they kept on with the same tactics. 
The officials did fine work, and the Nebraska 
players said they got a square deal for the 
first time on any trip. 

For the College, Haynes did good work. He 
was not rattled and seemed to be the "man-on- 
the-spot." His throwing was fairly good and 
he had no trouble in holding on to the ball. 
The rest of our team had difficulty in catching 
the ball when it was thrown to them. Ferris 
has improved in free throws since the last 
game. 

The line-up: 

Nbbhaska. Goals. K. S. A. C. Goals 

Hajrensicfc 7 R.F. Carr .....t 

Walsh 14 L. F. Ferris 3 

Moser 2 C; Cain ,.o 

Hoar t R.G. Topping 

Bell 1 L.G. Haynes o 

Total 25 Total. 5 

Fouls: Nebraska, 19: K, S. A. C, 17. Goals 
from free throw: Hagensick, 3; Ferris, 5. 
Officials: Referee, Van Orstel, of Nebraska; 
umpire, Ahearn, of K. S. A. C. Time- keeper: 
Lieut. B. F. Clark. 



Sad faces lengthen the dreary way; 
One sunny smile makes a dozen gay. —Ex. 



Mark Twain once played a joke on Doctor 
Deane, the present bishop of Albany. Doctor 
Deane was rector of an Episcopal church at 
Hartford, Mass., and Mark Twain was occa- 
sionally a member of his congregation. "I have 
enjoyed your sermon this morning," said Mark 
one Sunday, at the close of a service. "I wel- 
come it like an old friend. I have a book at 
home containing every word of it." The 
preacher indignantly challenged the humorist 
to produce the book. The next morning he 
received a dictionary.—^. 



294 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Ms*™: LrrCvcuv 

Ow« Of « >u«. -+-• 

'Printed In College Prlntlnir Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 



F. A. Kiene. Jb.,'05 J5dltor-in-chief 

Groveh Kahl. '07 Business Manager 

E. C. Fahkar. '07 literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08 Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham. '08 Exchange Editor 

C. E. Whipple. *07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. W. Subscription Manager 

A^pSi^SZ'^f Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

J as. R. Coxen. '08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure Insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Feb. 22, 1906. 

The editor wishes to make no excuses at 
present in announcing- that during 1 the few 
weeks that he remains in office the Herald will 
continue under its old policy. Contrary to the 
belief of a great many students, the retiring 
editor and business manager will leave the 
paper not swamped in debt, but as prosperous 
apparently as when it was given into their 
hands. In requesting the societies to back the 
paper with a small amount each term, we con- 
sidered ourselves justified in the request, for 
under the present management the Herald has 
been enthusiastic in backing the societies and 
advancing their interests whenever opportunity 
offered. It is to be regretted that the societies 
have felt themselves not bound in any way to 
return in kind for this. The argument has 
been advanced that it is the stockholder who 
should respond when a call is made. Yes! it is 
always a small circle who should bear the bur- 
ben and do the work. If the stockholders and 
subscription lists included half the society 
members there would be no occasion to call for 
assistance and cooperation from the societies 
a$ organizations. But we will drop the matter 
here with the statement that any one doubting 
the sincerity, good faith and. earnestness of the 



Herald staff will do well to give expression 
of this doubt before the person who has called 
it forth. Once more we ask the students to 
cast about for an editorial force competent to 
carry the Herald through a year of active 
endeavor. Its duties are not light, and calls 
for self-sacrifice will be many. There will be 
abundant reward, however, if ideal College 
men and women enter the field. 



More or less exception is being taken to the 
knocks which appear in the Herald pages, 
and we feel that this should not result from 
them. They are only meant to correct small 
irregularities, imagined or real, which concern 
the student body, and not to reflect discredit 
on any individual connected with it. We are 
laboring under the belief that perfection is a 
hard thing to attain, and the bumps we get in 
this world, whether deserved or not, should 
not push us farther down the incline, but 
should furnish us a little notch where we may 
get a firm foothold. 



Tickets are out for the Annual Musical Con- 
cert to be given March 8, Students, here is 
your chanee to hear enjoyable music and to 
encourage a work most worthy of the interest 
and coftperation of all. Buy your tickets now. 



Students, come out a few moments each week 
and watch baseball practice. 



If you are interested, write a short squib for 
the Herard. 



foaimtt. 

We realized how small our hall is when we 
were unable to give standing room to the crowd 
assembled when society was called to order. 
After singing, we were led in devotion by Cora 
McNutt, and Odessa Dow took charge of the 
meeting for a few minutes while our president 
was excused to comb her hair. Among the 
many good musical numbers on the program 
were a cornet solo by Mr. Jackson and a vocal 
solo by Mr. Farrar. The description of the 
White House, given by Lois Failyer, and also 
the "Life of Alice Roosevelt," given by Mary 
Copley, were interesting. In a debate it was 
deeided that "Such costly presents should be 
sent to Alice Roosevelt." Ethel Bisby read a 
good number of the '^Oracle." Next on the 
program was a reproduction of the wedding «f 
Miss Alice Roosevelt to Mr. Longw orth. Edith 
Forsythe acted as bride and Flora Hull as 
groom. The ceremony had all of the dignity 
and solemnity of the original, and the bridal 
party was attended by ushers and military offi- 
cers. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




295 



Victor baseball goods. Frost & Davis. 

Complete line baseball goods. Frost & 
Davis. 

Professor Erf will go to the National Dairy 
Show next Monday. 

R. R. White was visited by his father for a 
few days last week. 

A. .T. Strom went to Chicago last Saturday 
to attend the dairy show. 

The Printing- Department had twenty em- 
ployees at work Monday. 

A barber shop opposite the city post-office 
will be opened in a few days. 

We are sorry to hear of the death of Chas. 
Eastman, who was a freshman in '(15. 

Victor Oman went to his home in Leonard- 
ville, Saturday, to spend a few days. 

Cora Blanchard, formerly a '07, is visiting 
her sister, Mrs. Theo. Scheffer, this week. 

A touching motto to be seen in the press- 
room: "If you want to get killed, come in." 

Annice Howell, accompanied by Gussie 
Amos, visited at her home near Topeka last 

Captain Shaffer gave his tactics class some 
illustrated lectures on the battle of Gettysburg 
last week. 

Miss Jessie Durant left for her home near 
Ionia, last week. Ill health compelled her to 
leave College. 

Some Webster boys are organizing a chorus 
to be called the "Wild, wooly, wozzy, warbling, 
Webster Willies." 

The delegates to Students' Volunteer Con- 
vention at Nashville will leave next Tuesday 
and be gone one week. 

G. W. Gasser was about College the early 
part of the week. He looks pretty much bruised 
up as the result of his bad fall. 

Invitations are out for the marriage of Mary 
Mc Boyle, first year in '9», to take place at the 
home of her parents, March 1. 

The city high school is to have "two wings" 
added to it before long. By their actions some 
of the students are in need of wings also. 

Assistant Potter, of the Mechanical Depart- 
ment, makes his lectures as dry as possible, so 
his jokes will not appear in the student papers. 

John Hessin, for six years a Regent of K. S. 
A. C, is out for the nomination for congress- 
man from the Fifth district. He wants to suc- 
ceed Calderhead. 



Mrs. Harry Fletcher, formerlv Miss Ellen 
Avery, student here in '02, died at the Clay 
(enter hospital, February 3. Her death was 
caused by appendicitis. 

The appearance of the north side of Poyntz 
Avenue is to be improved by tearing down the 
old wooden awnings and replacing them with 
modern canvass awnings. 

Frank Adams, who took the electric light to 
bed with him some time ago to warm his feet 
and burned up his lied, has reformed and now 
endures the cold feet as a necessary evil. 

The Washington County Club, which has re- 
cently been organized, will give its first social 
on the evening of February twenty- two. All 
Washington county students are invited to at- 
tend. 

Assistant Freeman won first prize in an orig- 
inal valentine contest at the "banquet to T. P 
M. Club husbands" last week. It's up to Mr 
Freeman to explain why he was in that kind 
of a crowd. 

Earle Shaw, who has been suffering from 
attack of malaria for the last two weeks, will 
return to his home near Eskridge this week. 
His father has been here for the past week tak- 
ing care of him. 

Mr. McArthur, assistant to the National 
secretary of Bible study, was in town for a few 
hours Wednesday of iast week. He gave a 
short talk to the Y. M. C. A. Bible study 
leaders while here. 

Professor Kammeyer was recently presented 
with a handsome rocking-chair by the class of 
'(15. He being unable to reach each and every 
member of the class, we gladly assist him in 
tendering sincere thanks. 

The Alpha Beta society gave a reception to 
the A. B. Alumni Association. Professor and 
Mrs. Kammeyer and R. R. Birch last Saturday 
evening in the D. S. Hall. A short program 
consisting of music and toasts was given, "after 
which dainty refreshments were served. 

Roy Monroe, sophomore in '04, was around 

College for a few hours last Friday morning. 
He was on his way to Plainville, Kan., where 
he was married, February 18, to Miss Florence 
Stick. They will make their home on the farm 
of the groom near Whiting, Kan. The Herald 
extends congratulations. 

Frank Thompson, who lives at the southwest 
corner of the College grounds, was adjudged 
insane last week and sent to the State insane 
asylum. He' was making an original transla- 
tion of the Bible and trying to discover a 
microcosmic salt which he* expected to use for 
the base of a fluid in which all metals would be 
soluble. 

The following program will be given in the 
old chapel Saturday afternoon, February 24: 

Fay McConnell The Story of Two Lives 

i<>ltth Justin Joan of Are in Prison 

C. R. Jacobus Mary had a Little Lamb 

Irene Injrraham. . ..The Murderer Cannot Keep his Secret 

Linn Daughters What is Success 

Ethel Perry The Voice of the Star 

Adelaide Poston The Charms of Rural Life 

Beulah Pitman On the Rappahanock 

H. A . Paul — At the tomb of Napoleon 

R. R. Nelson The Bridge 

R. M. Moody Laska 



■ 



■I 



296 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Baseball practice each day in the City Park. 
Ball gloves f PO ra 25 cents to $3.50. Frost & 



Davis. 



boys will give a dance, Feb- 



The ** junior" 
ruary 22. 

Percy Roberts' mother and sister visited him 
last week. 

Prices are right on Victor ball goods. Frost 
& Davis. 

Prof. O. F.rf went to the Chicago Dairy show 
last Sunday. 

The F a S* club entertained a few friends 
last Monday night. 

President Nichols made a business trip to 
Des Moines last week. 

The domestic science short-course class had 
its picture taken Monday. 

Miss Boline Hanson enjoyed a visit I'rom her 
brother a few days last week. 

If you want some good candy, go to John 
Harrison's store, 1140 Moro street. 

Miss Susie Harper, former student, visited 
with Miss Josie Holland last week. 
Ralph Hunt went to Blue Rapids Saturday 
i visit with home folks over Sunday. 
Oranges are now cheap and plentiful. John 
Harrison keeps all kinds of fresh fruits. 

Miss Mabel Skinner, of Topeka, visited Miss 
Louise Fleming last Sunday and Monday. 

Little Miss Hal stead helped her father in the 
physics experimental laboratory last Monday. 

Miss Elizabeth Campbell visited with her sis- 
ter. Miss Achsah Campbell, several days last 
wppk 

Coach Melick took the Nebraska basket-ball 
team around the College last Monday after- 
noon. 

Prof. O. Valley will go to Junction City in a 
week or so to take part in a musical given 
there. 



to 



The Choral Union will meet every noon at 
12:15 until March 8, when the concert is to be 
given. 

Coach Ahearn says that instead of one wide 
walk down Lovers' Lane, there should be two 
narrow ones. 

Foss Farrar has been suffering from an at- 
tack of Furunculus on several spots during the 
last few days. 

Mrs I. N. Rigney entertained at a six o'clock 
dinner last Tuesday evening in honor of Miss 
Minnie Connor. 

Miss Susie Harper, of Augusta, Kan., is vis- 
iting with Josie Holland and other old College 
friends this week. 

Dr Goss and the man who sells kerosene 
around town have the only coon-skin caps in 
this neck of the woods. 

Prof O. H. Hal stead, wife and daughter, 
visited over Sunday with Mr. Hal stead's 
mother, in Leonardville. 



Warm weather will soon be here, and J" 1 "* 
Harrison is prepared to serve all kinds of soft 
drinks at his soda fountain. 

Next Saturday morning, in chapel, Percy 
Roberts will sing, "Come Unto Me All Ye 
That Labor" by Coenon. 

The Ionian hall was crowded Saturday, and 
even the windows were filled. The special at- 
traction was a mock Alice Roosevelt wedding. 

New baseball goods for this season. Twenty- 
five styles gloves, eighteen pads, and all styles 
bats and other necessaries: Frost & Davis. 

The fellow who walked off with the local edi- 
tor's umbrella, one day last week, had better 
return it unless he wants to get his name in tne 
paper. 

The carpenter-shop has been busy making 
chemistry tables for the past week. A large 
number of patterns for the machine-shops have 
also been turned out. 

Fred Van Dorp, '05, wrote to a friend in Col- 
lege savins that he had bought a farm near 
Topeka, with a nice house on it, and was 
ready to settle to business. 

Earle Thurston requested us to mention the 
fact that he passed in object drawing. He is 
taking it for the seventh time. He also re- 
ceived a new necktie and a dollar for not 
"flunking" at mid-term. 

Assistant Melick said that while at Chicago 
he saw a herd of cows milked, the milk cooled, 
pasteurized, and the cream churned all by 
machinery. Nobody touched the machinery 
until the work was done. 

An unusual number of people took advantage 
of the fine weather last Sunday and strolled or 
rode around the country. From the outlook 
there will evidently be considerable doing 
among the young folks this spring. 

Two perfect, unique and attractive note-books 
in classics were received by Miss Rice at mid- 
term Both were illustrated and contained 
fancy free-hand designs. Two Filipino stu- 
dents, Adrian P. Alcazar and Jaun Alvano, 
were the authors. A grade of 100+ was given 
to each. 



A couple of roasts overheard at the senior- 
junior reception : 

"Old Harvey Hubbard went to the cupboard, 
To hang up his clarinet. 
But when he got there, the cupboard was Bak-d 
And I guess he's banging there yet, 

"Teedle Deedle Dumplin, My Son John," 
Went to bed with his shoulder straps on. 
Mixes chemicals one by one. 
Teedle Deedle Dumplin. ' My Son John. 

Miller, of the Agricultural College, at Man- 
hattan, Kan , has enrolled in C. A. C. Mr. 
Miller makes the change on account of his 
health, We are hoping his health will improve, 
but also hope he will fall in love with C. A. C, 
and remain with us permanently. Mr. Miller 
was the catcher on the K. A. C. baseball team 
last vear, and no doubt will prove a valuable 
addition to our team. A. L. Haggman, a friend 
who accompanies him, played guard on last 
season's football team.— Itocky Mountain Colle- 
gian. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



297 



• 

: 



I NEW H ATS x 



NEW GOODS t 

ARRIVING NOW 



« 



STLDKNTS, we are making great preparations for vou this spring 
We appreciate your patronage, and will soon be in shape to show 
you one of the nobbiest assortments of Toggery ever offered. :: :: 



! 



Meet our 
Tailor 



JOHN COONS, of Course 



Walk^Over 
Shoes 









Alumni and Former Students. 



P. H. Ross, '02, and Esther (Hanson) Ross, 
'03, of Ken a i, Alaska, are the parents of a little 
boy. 

V. L. Cory, '04, who is still with the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, writes to have his address 
changed from Modesto, Cal., to McPherson, 
Kan. 

E. M. Amos, '02, one of the owners of the 
Republic before it changed hands, will print the 
Western Poultry Review and run a job office in 
Manhattan. 

Florence Ritchie, '04, spent a few days re- 
cently at her home in Manhattan. She is 
teaching domestic science in the Girls' Indus- 
trial School, at Beloit. 

Wayne White, '05, is getting to see a good 
deal of country with the Santa Pe. His address 
has just been changed from L.a Junta, Colo., to 
San Moncial, N. Mex. 

Harvey Adams, '05, was about College last 
week taking a last long look at familiar scenes 
before leaving for the Philippines, where he has 
a third lieutenancy in the constabulary depart- 
ment. 

The K. S. A. C. people of New England are 
planning to have a reunion about April 1. 
Those interested are requested to write to A. B. 
Carnahan ('05), 28 Warren St., Lynn, Mass., 
or Prof. F. A. Waugh ('91), Amherst, Mass. 



Clara Pancake, '03, writes to have her Her- 
ald sent to Netawaka, where she will visit for 
a few months. 

"Skeeter" Ballard, '05, has been selected as 
assistant in horticulture at the Maryland Agri- 
cultural College. This was the place offered to 
Roland Mckee, '03, just before he entered the 
Government service. 

Z. L. Bliss, '00, who is in the forestry busi- 
ness at Oregon, 111., sends, in the wherewithal 
to provide himself with the Herald for a 
couple of years more and expresses his appre- 
ciation of the efforts made by the present staff. 
As he was once editor himself, he knows a few 
of their trials. ' 

R. W. DeArraond, senior in '03, writes from 
the 0*. S. Agricultural Experiment Station at 
Sitka, Alaska: "I am pleased to note the 
growth of the College, the excellent work of the 
Athletic Association, and especially the splen- 
did progress of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation/' 

P. M. Biddison, '04, who is with the Logan 
Natural Gas and Fuel Co., says that the world 
is treating him well and that he sees no use in 
continually howling ahout the coldness, wick- 
edness and hardness of the world just after one 
is out in it from College. He surety is wise 
in taking for his motto, "Boost, don't knock." 

Have you been asked to subscribe for the 
Herald lately? The whole staff, as well as 
the executive committee, is on a hunt for de- 
linquent, as well as for new subscribers. 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 



Headquarters for College Supplies 
A; A of all Kinds X X 



-WK I'AHBY 



Spalding Line of Hageball and Sporting Goods 
Keutfel & Esser Line of Drawing Material 
Henry Sears Line of Warranted Pocket-knives 
Waterman and Parker Lines of Fountain Pens 
Varney Fountain Pen, only $ 1 .OO. 



CALL AND SEE IS 



311 POYNTZ AVENUE 



298 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 






College Campus Restaurant 

Oysters 25 cents. 

Chilli 15 cents. 

Beef Soup 15 cents. 

CONFECTIONARY, SHORT ORDERS. ETC. 

GARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors. 



NEW AND 2ft* 
SCHOOL BOOKS 



R. E. LOFINCK 



SPECTACLES 
GOLD PENS 



DIAMONDS 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA, 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, No- 
tions and Sporting Goods. 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



f STUDIO is thejjlace to £et 

J) PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: :: 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Orr 



STUDENTS, 

GET YOUR 



WOOD 



of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

PHONE 6 "isr^ss-jfr- 



Second Annual Concert 

... By the K. S. A. C. Choral Union . . . 



College Glee Club. 



.... Assisted by ... . 

Karin Lindskog, violinist, of Chicago. Olof Valley, basso 
and several student soloists. 



Auditorium, Thursday, March 8, 1 906 

8 o'clock p. m. 

MANHATTAN, - - - - KANSAS 



Tickets, 



50 cents 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



299 



WHERE! WHERE! WHERE! 

""il-ST Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

You can get anything along College supplies that you want? 



FINEST LOT OF STRTIONERY IN TOiflZN 

We represent a student organization, and we want the students' trade. 

We also handle f WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PENS 



-His 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 



from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, Hgr. 

Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
1NE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on G R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo. T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

M ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 



THE HERALD 

$1 PER YEAR. 



Combination Key Ring, 

Key Tag, Cigar Cutter, 

and Pocket Screw Driver. 




NICKEL PLATED. 



"i (\f* Remember, you get the whole 
I VT^« t hi n g f or |0c., Key Rbg, ar.d 
all. A good Key Ring costs from 5 to 
10c., the Cigar Cutter b easily worth 25c, 
and the Pocket Screw Driver is alone 
worth the prize of the en'ire combination. 
On tap of all this we throw in the Name 
Tag. If yiu want us to stamp your r.arr.e 
and address on the Tag we will do to fc r 
1 0c. extra. Ths regular price for this alone 
is 25c. Most people have them stamped 
so that if keys are lost they will be returned 
to the owner. Some don't car« to have 
them stamped. We furnish them either 
way. If your dealer doesn't handle them 
you can get them from 

The Taylor Mfg. Co., 

Sole Man nf adorers. HARTFORD, CONN. 




mmtm 



■ 






800 





n 






i 



L- 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



71 



"THE OLD RELIABLE 



99 



.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



44 



Phone 167 




Oysters 



^nr 



All Kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Fountain: 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 

ICE CREAM SODAS 



I VI mi 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



n 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. €]j If so. don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
•I Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly whilfi butter values are highest. C| Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drutum Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and tt York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 



I 



How the 



ffiMMKlt 



Fills Itself 



Just a quick, simple pressure of the thumb and Conklin's Self- 
Filling Pen is completely filled. A collapsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel of the pen compresses, and when released, instantly draws in 
the ink through the feed channels at the point, filling the Conklin 
Pen ready to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. Dis- 
penses entirely with the old-fashioned drop-filler method. So simple 
that you can't go wrong — you can't get your fingers inky, or entail 
any loss of time. The lock-ring shown in the lower left hand cor- 
ner prevents the ink from being forced out after reservoir has been 
filled, either when pen is in use or in the pocket. 

The ORIGINAL and ONLY GENUINE 

Conklin's Self-Filling Pen 

is a marvel that has completely revolutionized fountain 
pen construction. Its surprising simplicity combined with 
utmost care in manufacture, makes it practically proof to 
trouble of any sort. Responds at the first touch to the 
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ink is exhausted. Ink capacity as large as old style 
fountain pens, yet it never overflows when in use. 
Presser-bar prevents pen from rolling off a sloping surface, 
and is so arranged as not to be in the way when writing. 
Feed channels are thoroughly cleaned in the same easy way 
as filling. All Conklin Pens are unconditionally guaran- 
teed to fulfill all claims we make. 
If your dealer does not.handle the Conklin Pen, let us 
make you our Special Offer to Fountain Pen Users, 
Full information, with illustrated catalog, 
sent upon request. 

Sold by "Dealers Everywhere. 
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^Chc Students' Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X, X, 





Second Annual Concert 

BY THE K. S. A. C. CHORAL UNION AT 

AUDITORIUM 

Thursday, March 8, 1906, 8 p.m. 

Manhattan, Kansas 



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UNITED STATES SEPARATOR 

Continues to Lead 

At Maine State Dairyman's Convention, December, 1905, there were 

91 entries of butter tn all Classes. 



42 per cent of all the entries made from U. 5. Separator Cream. 
20 per cent of all the entries made from DeLaval Separator Cream. 
38 per cent of all the entries made from 5 or 6 other methods. 
9 Entries of the Creamery Class the U. S. average score was 94.8. 
9 Entries of the Creamery Class the DeLaval average score was 94.3. 
30 Entries of the Dairy Class the U. S. average score was 93.9. 
9 Entries of the Dairy Class the DeLaval average score was 93.5. 
The average score of all entries in all Classes was 94. "> 

DAIRY SWEEPSTAKES, UNITED STATES SCORE, 97 3-4. Out of 1 3 prises 
awarded, 7 went to United States Butter and only 2 to the DeLavel. The United States 
Separator averages to lead in quality of product as well as thoroughness of separa- 
tion. Send for phamphlets describing Uulted States Cream Separator. 



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stop at Askren's, The Optician, who 
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Meet all trains day or night. 
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THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



301 



The Kansas Gity 



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THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



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waists. The latest thins out. 


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and solid colors. 


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MOHAIRS In Brown. Blue and 
Green, 36 Inches wide, 35 cents. 


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Murdock's Coffees. 


Black and White check suit- 


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Underwear at popular prices. 


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^Thc Students OtThe 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MottorlietEveiyCteeGultivateHis Own Gento 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., March 1, 1906: 



Number 23 



% Athletic Notes. 

Wanted. —One man who can run one hun- 
dred yards in ten seconds. One man who can 
vault ten feet and six inches. Persons who can 
fill the above requirements, report at once to 
Coach Melick. 

The Athletic Association has secured a new 
ten-year lease on Athletic Park. Plans will be 
drawn at once for a new grand stand and 
dressing rooms, and work on them will begin 
about the first of the month. 

Basket-ball tomorrow evening. The game is 
with the State Normal team. Indications are 
that our boys will win, but it will be a very 
close game. The line-up of our team will 
probably be the same as in the last game. 

Baseball practice began in good shape last 
week. The old men are all showing up in fine 
shape, and the new men are doing fairly well. 
Seven pitchers have been working out, and 
several of them will make good. The main 
drawback seems to be the lack of an experi- 
enced catcher. If there are any more new men 
who want to try for the team, they should get 
out at once. 

The first of the series of cross-country runs 
was held on Wednesday afternoon, February 
21. The run was over the road around the 
College campus, the distance being two miles. 
Much enthusiasm was shown by the spectators, 
of which there were probably three hundred. 
There were fourteen entries in the' run, each 
class, except the juniors, being represented. 
The time of the winner, W. G. Milligan, was 
exceptionally good. He covered the distance 
in ten minutes and thirty-four seconds, break- 
ing the State record for two miles by three sec- 
onds. The State record is held by K. U. and 
was made on a track, while Milligan 's run was 
on a rough road with several hills to bother 



him. The following are the men who secured 
places at the finish and their time. 

1. W. G. Milligan, '09 10 m M 34 s. 

2. J. N. Bealey, '06... ..11m., 9 s. 

3. Milo Hastings, '06 ...11m., 9J s. 

4. M. R. Shuler, '06 11 m., 244 s. 

5. T. P. Weber, '09 11 m., 36J s. 

6. Chas. Lipperd, '09 ....11m., 56 s. 

7. D. K. Morris, '08 11 m., 59 s. 

The standing of the classes is : Seniors, 16 ; 
freshmen, 15; sophomores, 1. 



The senior- junior basket-ball game was held 
in Commercial Club Hall the evening of the 
Washburn game. The first half was played 
before the College game, while the second half 
was played between the halves. The game 
could hardly have been called basket-ball, ex- 
cept for the fact that a basket-ball was used. 
Much amusement was afforded the spectators, 
for the game was a rough-and-tumble contest 
from the beginning to the end, The final score 
was 9 to 6 in favor of the winners. 

The line-up: 
Seniors. Juniobb. 

Evans ".. . . Forward : Kahl 

Cassell For w ard . : Clark 

Weaver Center Davis 

Ferris v.. Guard ....Stauffer 

Ramsey Guard Justin 

Goals from field: Evans, 1; Stauffer, 2; 
Goals from free throw: Cassell, 4; Clark, 1. 



Washburn Defeated. 
In a very closely contested game, our basket- 
ball team won from the Washburn team last 
Wednesday evening by a score of 32 to 29. 
Nearly every one expected Washburn to win,, so 
the result came as a great surprise. After the 
game of Monday night, in which bur boys dis- 
played such poor team-work, people 
hardly prepared for the fine exhibition, ^h,^ 
they gave. A person who witnessed jb^h,^ 



304 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Nebraska game and the Washburn game could 
hardly help noticing the great contrast between 
the two teams in almost every particular. 
There'was a good deal of rough work in both 
games, but there the resemblance ceased. Ne- 
braska took their penalties and smiled, while 
Washburn took theirs and "chewed the rag." 
Hope, the captain, was the man who did this, 
but he reflected no credit on either his team or 
his college by such work. The rest of the 
Washburn team played and behaved like gen- 
tlemen, and Washburn may well be proud of 
them. In throwing goals they were much su- 
perior to our boys, but in team-work they were 
far behind. Hope did their best work, but 
MllHce and Bowman also played good games. 

Our boys have certainly made wonderful im- 
provement in team-work. They played like a 
team of veterans, and they used their heads at 
all times ^ Their passes were sure and only in 
goal throwing were they weak. Nystrom 
played his first game and did fine work. He 
and "Shorty" Haynes make a dandy pair of 
guards. Cain, Ferris and Carr kept up the 
fftst work that has characterized their playing 
all season. 

The score : 

Wabhbubn. Goals. 



Hope 7 R.F. 

Ho w man 8 L. P. 

Multee G. 

Hautfhey R. O. 

keatgoniery t L-G. 

Total It 



K. S. A. C. Goals. 

Ferris 6 

Carr 5 

Cain 2 

Nystrom 

Haynes 

Total 13 



Goals from free throws: Ferris 6, Hope 5; 
umpire, Abeam: referee, Stahl. 



y. w. c. a. 

A large number of new members were taken 
into the Association last Saturday. 

The meeting next Saturday noon will be on 
missions, with Stella Hawkins as leader. AH 
girls invited to come. 

The delegates for the Nashville convention 
left Monday night. They expect to be gone 
about a week. The Y. W. girls who go are 
Laura Lyman, Stella Campbell, Katherine 
Ward and Anna Foster. 



Band Concert. 

The College Concert Band gave a grand con- 
cert in Wamego last Wednesday, February 21. 
They were greeted by a large and appreciative 
audience. All were highly pleased and were 
profuse in their compliments. 

Mr. B. R. Jackson 1 s solo was a concert polka 
of patriotic melodies and showed that he has 
been gaining in his ability to make pure tone, 
and in ease of execution of difficult passages. 
Mr. R. H. Brown's violin solos pleased every 
One, and he responded to a hearty recall. The 



male quartet also gave some pleasing numbers. 
The program was well arranged and was 
partly patriotic, in honor of Washington's 
birthday, and every number was enthusias- 
tically applauded. 



Domestic Science Ass'h. 

Some of the senior D. S. girls, desirous of 
forming an organization, banded together last 
fall and the formation of the D. S. Association 
was the result. The Association meets regu- 
larly on the first and third Tuesdays of each 
month and devotes the time to the reading of 
papers on D. S. subjects and the discussion of 
these papers. Up to date, the meetings have 
been held at the homes of the members, but ar- 
rangements are being made whereby the asso- 
ciation expects to assemble in Kedzie Hall 
hereafter. It is the purpose of the seniors to 
ask the junior girls to join them soon. 

The last meeting was held at the home of Miss 
Harner, February 20. Miss Hanson and Miss 
Cooley read papers, the former on ''Domestic 
Science in America" and the latter on "Japa- 
nese Dietaries." These papers were followed 
by interesting discussions. Miss Bess Sweet 
and Miss Caroline Morton became members of 
the Association. A short business session fol- 
lowed. _________ M * s - 

toni&ns. 

Society was called to order by President 
Laura Lyman, and after the usual opening ex- 
ercises we proceeded with the program. This 
being the first session after Washington's 
birthday, our program consisted mostly of 
things pertaining to his life and time. 

The first number was a vocal solo by Miss 
Fitz, followed by a very interesting talk on 
"Anecdotes in Washington's Life," given by 
Helen Sweet. Other musical numbers were: 
instrumental music by Miss Augspurger, and 
Bessie Nicolet, and a musical novelty by 
Minnie Smith. Stella Ballard gave us a recita- 
tion. The Virginia reel f given by Mary Kim- 
ball and Gertrude Lill, took our minds back to 
"Ye Olden Times," told about in the "Oracle," 
which was read by Neva Larson. 

Business session was closed to visitors. 

E. B. 

Hantlttons. 

At roll-call each member responded by giv- 
ing a quotation from "Martha Washington's 
Cook Book." Messrs. H. E. Miller and J. E. 
Martin were initiated, thus making our roll 
number one hundred, even-up. Mr. Holloway's 
paper, entitled "Master-pieces of American 
Poetry," entertained and pleased the audience, 
as Dexter's papers always do. The remainder 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



305 



of the program was made up of a novel, "Allan 
Trent." which was presented in seven chapters, 
each chapter having a separate author. The 
characters were chosen from society members, 

the time was twenty years hence, and the place 
the Wildcat country west of Manhattan. 

Chapter I— By Ernest Adams. 

A description of the Whipple home, with character 
sketches of Mr. Whipple, his daughter Lucile, and the 
hired man. Milo. The arrival of Judge Hazen. 

Chapter II— By Frank Ferris. 
The quarrel. 

Chapter III -By Mr. Schottler. 
The view agent. Bob, Bob and the Judge, rivals. The 
villain foiled. A pair of plotters. The cowardly shot. 
Chapter IV-By J. N. Bealey. 

The outlaw gang. The capture of the chief of police. 
The cave and the rescue. 

Chapter v— By A. J. Co wles. 

The bullet holes in Bob's hat. 

Chapter VI— By R. H. Hillman. 

Bob trapped. The explosion. A one-sided battle. Ath- 
letic Bob victorious. 

Chapter VII— By J. A. Porter. 

In this the villains were punished, and Bob. in a moment 
of joy. promised to guide Lucile Whipple down the path 
of life, and so came the happy termination. 

Musical special tins were furnished between 
acts by Painter, Topping, and Eaton, who in- 
troduced, respectively, Mr. Kittell, Miss Har- 
old, and Mr. Grizzell. 

In the business meeting Chauncey was some- 
what annoyed, but all ended well, and we went 
to the hay rejoicing. J. H. c 



Websters. 

We have tried to think of something new, 
something really original to include in our re- 
port this time, but the gray matter of our 
brains has failed to respond so you'll have to 
take it in the same old style. 

Firstly, Kirk called us to order. Secondly, 
Gilkison prayed. Thirdly, J, A. Milham gave 
us a recitation. Fourthly to lastly, we had 
music multiplied by four, two speeches divided 
by three, and the "Reporter" raised to the 
one-half power. 

"Sol." next made us crouch in our seats in 
the face of the vivid truth as exposed by him. 
Jens Nygard was called upon for a speech, and 
Jens responded in his usual hearty manner, 
making us wish that he could be wuh us again. 

The business was a mixture of trials, tribu- 
lations, parliamentary law, and injustice to 
the innocent. Earl Thurston was convicted of 
tearing the veneer from the chairs when he 
only broke it off. The business began to wane 
after a while, so the juniors were called upon 
for their gasoline song. The mistake in call- 
ing for it was discovered only when too late. 

We then allowed the "youngsters" the use 
of the remainder of the time for election of offi- 
cers for their annual underclassman program. 
What happened then we can not even guess. 



College Locals. 
Fury, who pitched for a while last spring, is 
again in College, and will try for the team. 

Miss Kittel, freshman student, has quit 
College and gone to her home in Maryland. 

Carl Mallon says: "Baseball is baby-play, 
and football is easy, but basket-ball is stren- 



uous. 



D 



Asst. R. A. Sea ton enjoyed a visit from his 
father and mother, of Jewell, Kan., last Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

Professor and Mrs. Dickens entertained at 
whist last week, in honor of Mr. Elward, of 
Hutchinson, Kan. 

The Nationalist said that the junior-senior 
basket-ball game "looked like a flock of chick- 
ens after a grain of corn." 

G. R. T. Roberts, of Morrill, Kan., visited 
his daughter Fluta, Saturday and Sunday. He 
attended the horse sale while here. 

Miss May Grilling was out of College for a 
few days last week, on account of the death of 
her grandmother, who died February 21 on Col- 
lege Hill. 

James Brock, who has been out of College 
for about a year, is back again and at work. 
He has been farming in western Kansas and in 
Oklahoma. 

The "Pest-house Quartet," consisting of Ny- 
gard, Kiene, Thurston, Stevens and Winter 
held a reunion Saturday, and rumor says they 
had a Dutch lunch. 

Lieut. D. H. Clark will take charge of all 
basket-ball games in the future. He has a 
right to do this, for he wears a College mono- 
gram on his sweater. 

The Ladies' Quartet, formerly called the 
Queer Quartet, assisted by Miss Bernice Dodge 
as reader and Miss Laura Perry as pianist, 
will give an entertainment at Riley on March 9. 

The Washington county social, given in the 
D. S. Hall last Thursday evening, was well 
attended. A program was given and refresh- 
ments served. About forty Washington stu- 
dents were present. 

The senior football team, having just re- 
covered from the effects of the game last fall, 
had its picture taken recently, in order that 
the coming generations might gaze on it in 
wonderment and awe. 

A few of the friends of Misses Anna Fitz and 
Grace Hawkins surprised them on the evening 
of February 22 in the form of a social party in 
honor of their birthdays. A pleasant evening 
of various games was enjoyed and dainty re- 
freshments were served. 



J. 



306 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Mot re: LfTCvlRV 
OmC CviTivwTC Hi j 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, live cents. 



The day returns and brings us the petty 
round of irritating concerns and duties. Help 
us to play the man ; help us to perform them 
with laughter and kind faces; let cheerfulness 
abound with industry. Give us to go blithely 
on our business all this day ; bring us to our 
resting beds weary and content and undis- 
honored, and grant us in the end the gift of 
sleep. Amen.— Robert Louts Stewnmn. 



F. A. Kiknk. Jr.. '06 Editor-in-chief 

G rover Kahl. '07 Business Manager 

E. C. Fabhab, '07 Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08 Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham, '08 Exchange Editor 

C.E. WHIPPLE. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. W Subscription Manager 

j^asssa. w 08 r a — • ^ ™°» 

Elizabeth Svvket. "04 .■... . ... Alumni Editor 

Jab. R. Cojcbn. '08 , Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

• To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be bung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon or each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Mar. 1, 1906. 




Students and visitors may occupy spare mo- 
ments very pleasureably these days in visiting 
the College greenhouses. Foreman A he am 
and his assistants have been very active in 
making the houses attractive, and every one 
will be struck with the general appearance of 
order and excellence in the flowers and plants. 



There is a good deal of room for improve- 
ment in general hall conduct among the stu- 
dents. It is not uncommon to see a bunch of 
students congregate inside the post-office al- 
cove waiting for the appearance of mail in 
their boxes. No loitering should be permitted 
in this place. Passage through the hall is hin- 
dered by the same practice, while many con- 
sider themselves appointed to entertain the 
public with whistling and singing during class 
hours. It is time for the students to take a 
broad view of the matter and to think more 
often of the general interest. 



The interest which is being exhibited at pres- 
ent in all athletic events is very gratifying to 
every one who has their success seriously at 
heart. Basket-ball, cross-country runs and 
baseball practice are each receiving the limit 
of interest and attention. Only when interest 
is general can athletic sports be representative 
in the full sense of the word. We hope that 
this athletic interest is only a reflection of a 
more intense interest in the regular College 
work. It should be, we feel, for close applica- 
tion makes all things possible. Every student 
will be stronger for participating in some form 
of athletic work or in following it closely as 
an interested spectator, then to return with 
double effort to the prime consideration of 
student life. 



Additional Local. 

Miss Eva Burtner visited around College, 
Saturday. 

Miss Beulah Pittman is out of College with 
an attack of the mumps. 

Mr. Frank Peterson visited his sister, Miss 
Sadie Peterson, last week. 

Mr. Jas. Howard spent his vacation, last 
Thursday, in Kansas City. 

Miss Edith Justin was out of school last 
week on aecount of la grippe. 

See Gardner or Cheney for the swellest line 
of College postal -cards in town. 

Mr. W. W. Stanfleld came up from Topeka 
to visit over Sunday with friends. 

Carl Kipp expects to leave school at the end 
of this term and attend the Colorado Agricul- 
tural School. 

The new Choral Union Concert posters are 
out. Read them, buy your tickets, and then go 
to the concert. 

B. R. Jackson, of Lewis, Kan., visited As- 
sistant Professor Brown last Wednesday. He 
accompanied the band to Wamego. 

The junior basket-ball team, in charge of 
Captain Kahl, gallantly charged the photo- 
graph gallery Thursday, and, with inflated 
chests and broad smiles, had their pictures 
taken. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



307 




The Misses Deaver entertained their father 
a few days last week. 

Professor Erf is away this week in charge of 
a special dairy train. 

E. C Farrar and sister enjoyed a visit from 
their father last Tuesday. 

Professor Dickens went out to the Hays Ex- 
periment Station last Saturday. 

Elizabeth Morwick enjoyed a visit from her 
mother from Bradford, Kan., over Sunday. 

P. B. Milliken was called home last Monday 
on account of the serious illness of his father. 

H. O. Deaver, of Ionia, Kan., was visiting 
his two daughters here from Friday till Sun- 
day. 

Four juniors were noticed selecting rings at 
Askren's one day last week. It looks had 
indeed. 

J. C. Weaver, of Wakefield, visited his 
hrother Chauncey Saturday and Sunday of 
last week. 

A. J. Reed is away with the special dairy 
train this week. He is grafting for the; Agri- 
cultural Review. 

G. G. Harrison, of Jewell, came down Sat- 
urday to attend the horse sale and visit his 
son and daughter. 

Superintendent Rickman made a husiness 
trip to Topeka and Kansas City last Wednes- 
day and Thursday." 

Carrie Spieler, special student this term, had 
to leave school this week on account of the ill- 
ness of her mother. 

The wives of the members of the College 
Faculty were entertained, at dinner Friday by 
the domestic science girls. 

''Pierpont" Morgan looked so much like a 
"verdant" that he passed into the sale Satur- 
day without being challenged. 

Several of the freshman boys gave a dance 
for themselves and invited friends at the Com- 
mercial Club Hall last Friday night. 

Coach Melick attended the Chicago-Olwrlin 
basket-ball game while in Chicago. He says 
that he got some pointers for our boys. 

The College band left Tuesday noon ' for 
Wakefield, where they gave a concert that eve- 
ning. About thirty players made the trip> in- 
cluding Bruce Jackson. 

Colonel Robinson talked to the Ag. boys, 
last Friday, on horses. Colonel Robinson 
knows his business, and his lectures are always 
interesting and instructive, 



3B 



The Ladies' Quartet, composed of 
Sweet, Amos, Sjnith and Lyman,, will 



A. ©. Nash returned last week from a visit 
with his brother, A. N. Nash. MH. who is at- 
tending the School of Mines at Golden, Colo. 

Misses 
. accom- 
pany the Glee Club to Wakefield on March IX 

The following young men are the Y. M. C. A. 
delegates to the convention held at Nashville 
this week: McLean, Conwell, Whipple. Hollo- 
way, Garver, Praeger, and Gernert. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Barbour, of Minneapolis, 
Minn., who were here visiting their daughter, 
Miss Marguerite BaJi-bour, Director of Phvsical 
Training, returned to their home last week. 

About twenty-five cadets in charge/of Cap- 
tain Shaffer spent Monday forenoon in en- 
larging the target pit on the side of Bluemont 
and in placing the two new targets in position. 

A. N. H. Beeman, who has been employed 
on the InditxtrwIiHt since his graduation last 
spring, left for his home in St. Loo is yester- 
day. He will engage in the newspaper busi- 
ness there or in Kansas City. y. 

The farmer short-course students of '02 held 
a reunion at the Y. M. C. A. dormitory last 
Saturday evening. They have a. regular or- 
ganization and have a* circular, letter as a 
means of keeping in touch with each other/ J. 
A. Showwalter, of Halstead, Kan., is president. 

Professor Freeman gave a very interesting 
lecture Saturday night in the botany, class 
room to members of the ■ T* club and'iavited 
friends. His subject was "Life and Work of 
Louis Burbank." The "lecture was illustrated 
with lantern slides. 

Clyde Rickman, who has been presstpan in 
the Printing Department for the past four years, 
and who was a student employee for two : years 
prior to that time, has resigned his position to 
accept the position of business manager of the 
"No-Dust" Manufacturing Company of Man- 
hattan. 

While repairing aa electric bell jn Physical 
Science Hall Monday morning,* a Professor 
Hamilton received a bad fall that will keep 
him from his work for some time. The ladder 
on which he was standing slipped and threw 
him to the floor, dislocating his 1'eW' wrist, 
breaking his cheek bone, fracturing a rib, and 
severely bruising him. He. was taken, to the 
hospital, where he was cared for .by doctor 
Silkman. 

The Avery horse sale, which was held in the 
stock-judging pavilion last Saturday After- 
noon, was well attended by people - who seemed 
to have the cash and who were willing to spend 
it for good horses. The crowd was much 
amused by the more or less successful efforts 
of some students to gain admittance. Some 
came in through windows, some through cracks, 
and some fell In through holes the guards could 
not discover. Four auctioneers had charge of 
the sale. Bosquet, the head of the herd, sold for 
$2825, and Lena and Mina, the champion mares, 
sold for $2250. Several others sold for over 
$1000. The average of the entire herd was about 
$002. Buyers were here from Color ado* Wis- 
consin, Illinois, Texa*, and various other parts 
of the Union. * - ■ . 



~m 



809 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



J 



NEW HATS * 




NEW GOODS 
ARRIVING NOW 



^TT STUDENTS, we are making great preparations for you this spring. 
m We appreciate your patronage, and will soon be in shape to show 



you one of the nobbiest assortments of Toggery ever offered. 



M £T JOHN COONS, of Course 



Walk>Ov«r 
Shoes 



• 



Ask Jorgenson about the "Scandihoovian 
Club." 

Born to Rev. J. W. Hannura and wife, Feb- 
ruary 20, a son. 

Percy Lill reports heavy local showers last 
Sunday evening. 

Miss Myrtle Bartlett spent Sunday at her 
home in St. George. 

Miss Minnie Smith entertained her sister, 
and friend Miss Henry, last week. 

The ex-Ios. will have charge of the Ionian 
program next Saturday afternoon. 

Miss Bess Alexander went to Phillipsburg, 
Saturday, for an extended visit with her sister. 

Several of the Faculty members' wives vis- 
ited the gymnasium classes Friday afternoon. 

Edward Miers accompanied Doctor Silkman 
to Westmoreland one day last week. They re- 
turned that evening. 

Miss Ina Holroyd was unable to meet her 
classes Friday and Saturday on account of ill- 
ness. 

A man from Junction City has rented the City 
Auditorium and will open a roller-skating rink 
there about March 1. 

The Republic uses a great many of our locals, 
but gives us credit for them, which is more than 
we can say of the other papers. 

Mr. Harrison, of Jewell county, spent a few 
days last week visiting with his daughter 
Annie and son Raymond Harrison. 

Elder and Bowman attended a party down 
town one night recently, and one of the city 
papers in reporting it says: "Those present 
were Masters Elder, Bowman, etc. 

Professor Hamilton and Reverend Thurston 
expect to have a rooster fight in the near fu- 
ture. The former will match his barred Plym- 
outh Rock against the 1 atter ' s White Plymouth 
Rock. The proceeds will go to the Rooters' 
Club. 

Coach M. F. Ahearn was down in the Her- 
ald office Saturday breaking up the furniture 
because his name hasn't appeared in the Hkk- 
AiiD recently. We wish to apologize to him 
and we promise that his name shall appear reg- 
ularly after this. 



Orr 



9 STUDIO is the place to get 

& PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



■ • • * 



STUDENTS. 

GET YOUR 



WOOD 



of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

MANHATTAN, KAN. 

TO« N. THIRD ST. 



PHONE 6 



r 



ia ■( 



~1 



Spring Styles j 



i 



i 

i 



Hats, Shirts, 
Suits. Our 
New Oxfords 



an 



dSh 



oes are 



ready lor your inspection. 
See our window 

and offerings (or this 
SEASON. 



} l Knostman 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



309 



College Campus Restaurant 

Oysters 25 cents. 

Chilli 15 cents. 

Beef Soup 15 cents. 

CONFECTIONARY. SHORT ORDERS. ETC. 

CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Jens Nygard, '05, who is farming* near Ves- 
per, was about College a few days last week. 

Henrietta Hofer, J <>2. sends her address as 
:t21« Wabash Ave., care of Eleanor Club, Chi- 
t-ago. 

F. L. Courter, '05, is farming" near Downs. 
He hasn't lost interest in the cross-country 
runs, in which he took part last year. 

Herman Avery, '01. of Wakefield, was in 
Manhattan last week with his famous Percheron 
horses, which were sold at the College barns 
Saturday. 

We see on a "corn program," given at Pur- 
due, the names of several K. A. C. people. 
Ivy Harner, 'JKJ, head of the department of do- 
mestic science there, Myrtle Mather, '02, insti- 
tute lecturer, and Hartley Holroyd, '03, assist- 
ant forestry expert in the Department of Agri- 
culture, are among those who took part. 

A letter from Carl Miller, who is at Colorado 
Agricultural College, says he and Haggman 
are well located and are playing ball as well 
as studying some. They have heard of the 
fast K. 8. A. C. team even away out there and 
expect great things of our men. No doubt 
they will not be disappointed. He says he met 
Walter Smith, '05, in Denver. Carl is taking 
vegetable gardening in the class of O. B. 
Whipple, '04. 



Fred Hodgson, '05, is working on induction 
motor tests for the General Electric Co., in 
Schenectady, N. Y. Ed. Adamson, '05, is with 
the same company, and his friends will be glad 
to hear that he is able to be at work again. 
He was in the hospital eight weeks, with the 
best of care, and when he was able to go to 
work the company remembered him with a 
good place suitable to his strength. Messrs. 
Hodgson and Adamson are well satisfied with 
their work, and say they could not be with a 
better company or a more congenial set of men. 

Professor Eyer had a letter from Earl 
Wheeler, '05, in which he states that after leav- 
ing Manhattan he entered Cornell University 
under the head of the Dept. of Electrical 
Engineering, Professor Norris. He was put on 
special work for the professor, and while in 
this office was recommended to fill a position 
as head of the Department of Electrical Engi- 
neering in the Engineering School, Department 
of Electricity, Washington Barracks, D. C. 
In order to secure this position it was necessary 
to pass a civil service examination. The 
students in Mr. Wheeler's classes are all first 
lieutenants, the first five in their respective 
West Point classes. 



It has just leaked out that the pet name of 
"Shorty"' Haines, previous to coming here, 
was "Icabod." 

One of the seniors says that the juniors could 
keep their feet better in the basket-ball game 
because they had danced up there so much that 
they were used to the floor. 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 



Headquarters for College Supplies 
X X of an Kinds X X 



-WE CABBY 



Spalding Line of Baseball and Sporting Goods 
Ken ft el & Esaer Line of Drawing Material 
Henry Sears Line of Warranted Pocket-knives 
Waterman and Parker Linen of Fountain Pens 
Varney Fountain Pen, only $l.OO. 



CALL AND SEE IS 



311 POYNTZ AVENUE 




■n 



tm 



310 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




*■ 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photon 
graphs made. You 
feel better, so do we. 




Studio 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

• -. ■ i 

33 



PHONE 



For- the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

K I N G I S 

The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths lor one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. -You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga M La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

31X BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Walt for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

) THE BARBERS 

j . 

i Oh Third Street. In Union Na- 

tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bat ft tubs, tine line cigars and totletarticles 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



QO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc, 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best, X X 

W. M. STBMGLEY & CO. 



L 1 






THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



DROP IN THE 



Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

And buy your College supplies at the lowest prices. Ask to see those souvenir 
Post-cards. And don't forget that we handle Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens. 
Become a member of the Association for $1 and you /i# c» / mm 

get 5 per cent rebate on all purchases. It pays. LnQS. 0. JOflBS, mOT. 



-it is 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, flgr. 



AUingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 

cmrnc that 

OEDJJj grow 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo. T, Fielding & Sons. 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 



THE HERALD 

$1 PER YEAR. 



Combination Key Rind, 

Key Tag, Cigar Gutter. 

and Pocket Screw Driver. 




NICKEL PLATED. 



"I flf Remember, you get the whole 
I V«* thing for lOc, Key Ring, and 
all. A good Key Ring cods from 5 to 
I Oc . , the Cigar Cutter it easily worth 23c, 
and the Pocket Screw priver is alone 
worth the price of the entire combination. 
On top of all this we throw in the Name 
Tag. If you want us to stamp your name 
ana address on the Tag we will do so for 
I Oc. extra. The regular price for this alone 
is 25c. Most people have them stamped 
so that if keys are lost they will be returned 
to the owner. Some don't care to have 
them stamped. We furnish them either 
way. If your dealer doesn't handle them 
you can get them from 

The Taylor Mfg. Co., 

Sale Mawfactam*, HARTFORD, CONN. 




; 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 




I 



"THE OLD RELIABLE 



.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



i_- 



We make all our own 

- - - . ■ . ■■■• . - • ■ 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



J*. 



Phone 167 



All Kinds of- 




OySters 



TT 



Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Fountain: 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink line. Finest 

ICE CREAM SODAS 



Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



«J 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 

Cream Separator you certainly need one and 

doubtless know that you do. Q If so, don't make the 

mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 

NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 

^ Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 

fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. Q Buy 

your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 

of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO ' 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drumm Street. 



I 

General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 



I 



I 



-J 




How the 



WMlKll 



Fills Itself 



f 






\ 



Just a quick, simple pressure of the thumb and Con kiln's Sett- 
ing Pen is completely filled. A collapsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel of the pen compresses, and when released, instantly draws in 
the ink through the feed channels at the point, filling the Conklin 
Pen ready to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. Dis- 
penses entirely with the old-fashioned drop-filler method. So simple 
that you can't go wrong — you can't get your fingers inky, or entail 
any loss of time. The lock-ring shown in the lower left hand cor- 
ner prevents the ink from being forced out after reservoir has been 
filled, either when. pen is in use or in the pocket. 

The ORIGINAL and ONLY GENUINE 

Conklin's Sell-Filling Pen 

is a marvel that has completely revolutionized fountain 
pen construction. Its surprising simplicity combined with 
utmost care in manufacture, makes it practically proof to 
trouble of any sort. Responds at the first touch to the 
paper — flows evenly and regularly until the last drop of 
ink is exhausted. Ink capacity as large as old style 
fountain pens, yet it never overflows when in use. 
Presser-bar prevents pen from rolling off a sloping surface, 
and is so arranged as not to be in the way when writing. 
Feed channels are thoroughly cleaned in the same easy way 
as filling. All Conklin Pens are unconditionally guaran- 
teed to fulfill all claims we make. 
If your dealer does noUhandle the Conklin Pen, let us 
make you our Special Offer to Tomtom Ten Users, 
Full information, with illustrated catalog, 
sent upon request. 

Sold hy Healers Everywhere* 
THE C0NHJN PEN CO., 

SM, lit, SIS 



lkeE.A.WlIbelHlCo*SSBct4eSL.IIewT«k. 

KMCurtto St.. Denver. 
Co., 4H Market St-, 



fleet! 



.€. Eof. 
47 Market 9L. 






j— J 



jww^^^^H^^>«H^^w^HV»*vw^i«^»i^»t^ 






W. S. ELLIOT 



Students' Corduroy Trousers 
Yale Pattern, The Very 
Latest. -:- Price, $4.00 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING 



x. 



X 



Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
yean enables us to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 






The Big Racket 




Stationery, Pencils, Note-books, 
Tablets, Pens and Ink, Photo 
S upplies, Room Furnishings 

Don't buy your Spring Embroideries and Laces until you 
see our Unequalled Line. Everything in Laces from a 5-cent 
Valenciennes to the Genuine Linen Torchon. Big Values in 
6-cent and 10-cent Embroideries and upwards, also Skirt and 
Corset-cover Embroidery greatly underpriced. 



ft************************** * ! 



1 

* 







- 



— — — ^^ 



HChe Students' Herald 






Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 





2 



"> 



i- 



' 







THICK CREAM 



SELLS FOR ONE CENT MORE 
PER POUND THAN THIN CREAM 



fir The creameries of the country have become so con- 

*j\ vinced of the increased value of thick cretin over thin 

cream that many of them are paying one cent per pound 

more for cream testimg 30 per cent and over than for that 

testing under 30 per cent. The reasons for this are: 

FIRST.-Thlck cream makes better batter because U contains less 
milk and therefore keeps in better condition. SECOND.— Thick of earn 
is so much less In quantity that the cost of transportation 1* lees. 

It Is much better for the dairyman to make thick cream, because he has more 
skimmed milk left at home to feed the calves. It then follows that dairymen should 
buy only such separators as can separate thick cream. 

The U. S. Separators Lead the World in this Particular 



Beware of the cheap end 
They ww 



rly constructed Separators that eannot make thick cream, 
be expensive even if furnished without cost. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., Bellows Falls, Vermont 



Eighteen centrally located distributing warehouses 



throughout the TJnlted States and Canada. 



li 



I 



J _! 



Headaches 




If you are troubled with headaches, 
eye-aches or have trouble In reading, 
stop at Askren's, The Optician, who 
guarantees to cure these defects or it 
costs you nothing. We use no drugs 
or medicine of any kind. Absolute 
satisfaction guaranteed. :: :: :: :: 

a:askrena: 

THE GRADUATE OPTICIAN 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Buses 

A Hacks 




Day awd night 
Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for class 
parties, etc. Let us call 
your attention to oar up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: :: :: :: :: :: 



PHONE 65 



H. J. Bsrnhoust 



L. W. Phillips 




^=rnafc3sr*a=&: 



afawn 



■M 



^^™ 



■■■■ 



mm 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



313 



r 



I 



The Kansas City ^^ 

Veterinary College 

Course Thorough, Practical, Complete 



n 



I 



q A NEW BUILDING 
EXTENSIVE HOSPITAL 
AMPLE LABORATORIES 
COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 
EXPERIENCED INSTRUCTORS 



Graduates eligible to positions in the United 
States Bureau of Animal Industry, the United 
States Army, and to membership in the Amer^ 
ican Veterinary Medical Association* n n 



i 



CATALOGUE AND OTHER INFORMATION SENT ON REQUEST 

DR. S. STEWART, Secretary j 

j 1336 East 15th Street, » Kansas City, Mo, } 



314 



THE 8TUDKNTS' HitlKALD. 



JT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 

W2 *■ 




New Laces..' 

New White Goods. 

^All-over Embroideries^ for 
Waists. *' v 

Among the NEW SILKS we 
have a Gilt Edge Taffeta, wear 
guaranteed, 27 inches wide, for 
75 cents a yard. This is a boun- 
tiful soft silk suitable for waists 
and suits. We have it in Gray. 
Alice Blue, Reseda. Mack and 
White. 

C'hillon Taffetas. 37 inches 
wide, all colors, *I.0O. 

HI nek and White check Taf- 
feta, 36 inches wide. £1.00. 



Black and Gray stripe Taffeta. 
:« inches wide. *t.00. 

NKW SPRING WALKING t 
ana DRfcSS SKIRTS in a va~-" 
riety of different styles und ma- 
terials, 

NOBBY JACKETS in Covert 
and fancy mixtures, in all the 
new styles. 

See our t&M Jacket. 

New things in Cravenene 
Coats. 

Ladies' and Children's Muslin 
Underwear at popular prices. 



McCall Patterns, 10 cents and 
fS cents. None hi|j?her. 

Krippendorff-Dittmann Co.'s 
Ladies' rindTSflsses' Shoes, none 
as good for the price. 



LADIES' 

SLIPPERS. 



GYMNASIUM 



EVERYTHING IN HARD- 
WARE. 

BEST GROCERIES A T 
LOWEST PRICES. 

Murdock's Coffees, 

O. P. T. Extracts. 
Manhattan Bakinir Powder. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies" waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-s( airs 

Phone HH lor Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ueady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



CALL AT 



The LEADER 



AND BUY YOU R 

0XF0RD5 

THEY HAVE ONE OF 
THE LARGEST STOCK 
OP SHOES IN MANHAT- 
TAN, AND SELL FOR 
CASH, THEREFORE 



Prices Always Right 



Subscribe for 



THE HERALD 



$1 per year. 



PROFESSIONAL. 



DR. G. A. CKISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone. Colt ,108 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room 16. Union National Bank Building 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc Students Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MotTUDrLietEveiyODeGultivaceHis Cton Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., March 8, 1906. 



Number 24 



Cross-Country Ran. 

The second of the series of cross-country 
runs took place on Tuesday, February 27. The 
run was from the Agricultural Hall north to 
Zuck's Bush, east to the Blueraont reservoir, 
and then hack to the starting pi ace. The dis- 
tance was about three miles. The winners of 
the first and second places were the same as in 
the first run, W. G. Milli^an coming in first, 
with J. N. Bealey only thirty seconds behind. 
The time of all the runners was good, there 
being seven men who finished inside the time 
made by Oourter ove» the same course last 
year. Of thirteen entries, only one runner 
dropped out. 

The following are the records of the men who 
won points in the race : 

1. W. G. Milligan, '0» 19 m., 6| s. 

2. J. N. Bealey, '06 19 m., 36 s. 

3. A. R. Purdy, '09 .....19m., 42 s. 

4. Milo Hastings, 'OH 19 in., +5 s. 

5. M. R. Shuler, 'OH 20 m., IB s. 

«. R. R. Birch, '06 20 m., 18 s, 

7. G. P. Nieman, '09 20 m., 22 a. 

The class standings now are: Seniors 32, 

Freshmen 31, Sophomores 1. 



K. S. A. C. 48— K. S. N. 13. 

The basket-ball game with the State Normal 
team last Friday evening proved to tie one of 
the easiest victories of the season for our boys. 
K very body was looking for a close game, and 
some even expected a victory for the teachers ; 
but they failed to come up to their advance 
notices. In only one particular— making free 
throws— were the teachers superior toour boys. 
They were evidently handicapped by the low 
ceiling of the room*, but at no time did they 
display good team work. The game was rather 
rough, but both sides took their penalties with- 
out "ragging." 

For the Normal team, Partridge was easily 
the star. He threw one goal from the field and 



made five goals from free throws. Shuey also 
played a good game during the half that he 
participated. 

Captain Ferris did the best work for the Col- 
lege. He made twelve goals from the field and 
two from free throws. Topping played at 
guard and did good work, especially in the 
last half. Topping played a much better game 
than usual, throwing three goals in the last 
half. Carr, Cain and Nystrom also did fine 
work and were in the game right from the start. 

The line-up; 

K. S. N. Goals. 

of RF 



Shuey t 

Elmore 

Partridge 1 

Hariris I 

Wells,.... Oi 

Kinjf Of 

Cowen 

Total -i 

Goals from free throws 

ris 2. 



k. s. a. c. Seals, 

Ferris 12 



L. F 

C. 

R.G. 
L. G. 



Carr 
Gain. 



4 

4 

Nyntrom 

Topping 3 

Total 23 

: Partridge 5, Fer- 



Earodelphlans. 

The 'Delphians met as usual on Saturday 
afternoon, and the following program was 
given. 

The music consisted of a piano solo by Edna 
Jones; vocal solo. Florence Sweet; piano duet, 
Elsie Brown and Tillie Harold ; vocal solo, 
Allen Cooper. Other numbers given 
Pantomine, Louise Fleming, given by 
Harner, assisted by Helen Sweet and 
Jones: recitations, Grace Smith and 



were: 

Daisy 

Edna 

Celia 



Moore; parliamentary quiz, 
Delphi. Arthie Ed worthy. 



Leona Moore 



Bok Fails to Fill Date. 

The Lecture Course Committee is forced to 
announce that Bok, the editor of the lotttat 
Home Journal, will be unable to till his date on 
our lecture course. The committee has for 
some time been endeavoring to secure a definite 
date for this number, but without success. 




316 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Last Friday we received a letter stating" that all 
of Mr. Bok's dates have been cancelled on ac- 
count of editorial duties and other business. 
We regret very much that such are the circum- 
stances, and hope that the patrons of the lecture 
course will bear with us in what is as great a 
disappointment to the committee as to them. 
We will exert every effort to replace the num- 
ber with one equally as good. Watch the 
papers for further announcements. E. c. F, 



Franklins. 

A full house greeted President Reece as he 
rapped for order promptly at eight o'clock. 
After being led in devotion by Mr. Daniels, we 
soon found ourselves under the head of pro- 
gram. 

Mr. Brown opened the program of the eve- 
ning with a recitation. Then the Georgia 
Minstrels were introduced by Mr. Kirby, who 
kindly responded to an encore. We next 
listened to Mr. Baird*s review of literature, 
Mr. Olsen's excellent production, "The Spec- 
tator," and declamations by Messrs. Brown 
and Johnson. Then came Miss Elder's mis- 
cellaneous, followed by recess. 

After recess a lively business session ensued, 
during which Mr, Moore became a Franklin. 

c. s. 

Agricultural Association. 

The association was called to order by Presi- 
dent Snodgrass. After being led in devotion 
by Hull, we listened to some excellent music by 
E. W. Cudney, introduced by Harry Oman. 
M. L. Walter told us in a very interesting way 
what would be expected of us after leaving K. 
S. A. C. R. E. Gates read an instructive 
paper on "The Agriculture of the Southwest- 
ern portion of the State." Professor Dean, in 
an interesting- manner, told us of the benefit to 
be derived from intelligent work against insect 
pests. Mr. Mc Vicar rendered a declamation, 
which was well received. After Gilbert had 
read a well-written paper, chiefly concerning 
the road horse, M. L. Walter told us of our 
shortcomings. 

After a short but interesting business session 
we adjourned. R, Hull. 

A. B's. 

The A. B's. had a splendid session Satur- 
day. President Wendell called the society to 
order at the usual time, and we got busy. 
After torturing the poor old "Alma Mater" 
for a while, we concluded to give it a rest, and 
were led in devotion by Matherly, after which 
we listened to "The Race," an original story 
by Berkey. Master Paul Cam ah an then sang 
a song, which was followed by the "Gleaner," 



by Miss Westgate, which was quite up to snuff. 
Miss Boyce became an Alpha Beta and Miss 
Wahlgreen sang a solo, accompanied by Miss 
Carnahan. It was then time for recess, but 
school soon called and we were busy again. 
The teacher would not let us chew anything 
else, so we chewed the rag for a while, then 
sent our company home and nobody knows 
what we chewed. After Smithie told us our 
qualities, both good and bad, we hiked. 

M. G. S. 

A youth— a book 
A lass— a look 
Books neglected— 
Flunks expected.— Ex. 



Herald Stockholders' Meeting, 

The annual spring election of Herald staff 
officers will take place Friday afternoon, at the 
regular meeting of stockholders. The offices of 
editor-in-chief, business manager, local editor 
and subscription manager are to be filled. An 
amendment relating to the date of publication 
will be proposed for adoption, and considerable 
other business will come before the stockholders. 
There is some talk of levying an assessment on 
all stockholders for the purpose of improving 
the paper. This will doubtless meet with some 
opposition, but much can be said in its favor. 
One thing is certain: if the stockholders of the 
company want to see the Herald continue and 
be a credit to the College they will have to help 
a whole lot more than they have been doing. 
If they are not willing to work for the paper 
they may expect to pay some one else to do the 
work for them. We who have been on the staff 
for some time see many ways in which the 
paper might be improved, but such improve- 
ment can not take place when we have behind 
us a company of antagonistic, or at best indif- 
ferent, stockholders. 

Let every stockholder think over what we 
have said. Let him look over the work of the 
Herald for the past year and see if he has 
done what he could to help it along. Then, 
let him come out to the election to-morrow with 
a resolve to put in the best people to be had 
and to help those people in every way possible. 
If he hasn't enough interest in the Herald to 
do this much, we would suggest that he turn 
his stock back to the company so that some one 
may take his place who cares something for the 
priper and the things which it supports. 



"What silly verses that woman is reciting!" 
"I wrote them, Sir." "Ah— O, yes— to be sure 
—clever lines, but horribly delivered, don't 
you know— woman must be a fool to bungle 
'em so— who is she?" "My wife, Sir."— Ex. 






THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



BIT 




There is a time we know not when, 
A point we know not where. 
That marks the destiny of men 
To glory or despair. 

Why all this tail for triumph of an hour— 
Young. 

By turns we catch the vital breath and die, 
—Pope. 

Unmingled joys here to no man befall.— 
Southioell. 

Live well —how long or short permit to 
heaven. — Milton. 

A little piking now and then is relished by 
the best of men. — Ex. 

Wise men change their minds occasionally, 
but fools haven't any to change.— Ex. 

When the desire to do is accompanied by the 
power to accomplish, things happen. — Ex. 

The happiest life is that which constantly ex- 
ercises and educates what is best in us. — Ex, 

One hundred women of Stanford University 
will form a boating club, engage a coach, and 
develop one or more regular crews.— Ex. 

There are twelve students in the University 
of Kansas who have volunteered to go as for- 
eign missionaries when opportunity offers. 
— Ex. 

Princeton and Harvard are to play associa- 
tion football next week. They are organizing 
and will play games all winter, and will close 
the season in March.— Ex. 

The trustees of Chicago University have de- 
cided to erect a memorial library building for 
the late President Harper. The funds will be 
secured by popular donations. 

No one can be called educated who has not 
self-knowledge. It underlies all true wisdom, 
and saves one from calling that virtue in him- 
self which he calls vice in another. —Ex. 

You can lead a boy up to a university, but 
you can not make him think. You can sur- 
round a man with opportunities, but he alone 
can enable himself to profit by them.— Ex. 

"What sort of an audience do you like best?" 
a friend asked Mark Twain. "Who. in your 
opinion, makes the most responsive and sym- 
pathetic listeners?" "College men." replied 
Mark, after a moment's thought, "college men 
and convicts." — Ex. 



If you bestow a favor, forget it; but if you re- 
ceive one, it is wise to remember it. — Ex. 

UP-TO-DAEE DEFINITIONS. 

The simple life— Doing your own work. 

The strenuous life— Doing some other fel- 
low's work. 

The modern life— Getting some other fellow 
to do your work, — Ex. 

After a nine-days' strike, the students at the 
Pennsylvania State College resumed class 
work. The trouble arose over the right of the 
students to take their "cuts" at any time, and 
was finally settled by both faculty and students 
making concessions-— Ex. 

The total receipts for the Athletic Associa- 
tion of Purdue, including basket-ball, base- 
ball, the track team of last year and the past 
season's football, were $28.(150.25. The ex- 
penditures amounted to $20,fJ14.52, leaving a 
balance of $7 , 435. 73. — Ex. 

Hard to be sweet when the throng is dense, 

When elbows jostle and shoulders crowd; 

Easy to give and take offense 

When the touch is rough and the voice is loud; 
"Keep to the right" in the city's throng; 
"Divide the road" on the broad highway; 

There's one way right when everything's 
wrong; 
"Easy and fair goes far in a day." 
"Just keep sweet and keep movin'."— Ex. 

President Roosevelt's action in calling a 
meeting of the athletic directors of our big 
universities will not result in the elimination 
of football from the Colleges, as many news- 
paper men predict. Not until something else is 
substituted which is as effective in making a 
perfect man will it cease to be the great game 
of the American college student.— Ex. 

The laugh tells. A man's character may be 
fairly judged from what he laughs at. If he 
laughs at the pain, injury or disappointment of 
others, he is not one to be trusted. If he laughs 
at high or sacred things, his heart cannot be 
noble. A good, hearty laugh at anything 
truly amusing is one of the most wholesome 
things on earth. But to laugh at the wrong 
objects stamps the wrong-minded man or wo- 
man. — Ex. 

The cadet officers of the Naval Academy at 
Annapolis have voluntarily pledged themselves 
to report all cases of hazing which they may 
see. They think its time for upper classmen to 
quit such practices when the freshmen or any 
one receives treatment like that given in the last 
notable instance. The proper way to stop this 
uncalled for action is for the sentiment of the 
student body to work out its own salvation. 
Outside interference cannot reach the cause and 
stamp it out.— Ex. 



818 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motto: LctEvEAV 
0«Cwitiv*tcH.j 

Own OeMiuk. •->-• 

'Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at tbe post-office at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, live cents. 



P. A. Kiene. Jh..*06 Editor-in-chief 

Gkover Kahl, '07 Business Manager 

E. C. Fakrak. '07 Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. 'OS Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham, OK Exchange Editor 

C, E. Whipple. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J, S. Montgomery. 07 Subscription Manager 

(iiwcH Hawkins, oh > 

A. G. Phillips, W f Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

Jas. R. Coxen. '08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure Insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet, '04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Mak. 8, 190fi. 




Remember the stockholders' meeting to-mor- 
row afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, in south society 
hall. Every stockholder should be present to 
take a lively interest in everything 1 that comes 
up for*consideration. 



Several weeks ago the students of the Normal 
School had up for consideration the proposi- 
tion of raising the athletic association dues, 
and to include in them admission to all out- 
door games. Although there is no absolute 
need for such an action in our association at 
the present time, it is certainly a point well 
worth considering. The men who back up the 
association and bear the brunt of the work 
connected with it should have this considera- 
tion for their interest in the advancement of 
the organization. When difficulties arise and 
interest flags, tins scheme may well be adopted 
here to swing the students back of the athletic 
movement. 



We are glad to note the enthusiasm of the 
members of the Choral Union in preparation 
for the annual concert. This is or.e of the 
events of the College year that should be well 
patronized. It is practically the only time 
when the whole Musical Department puts forth 
an effort to give the best entertainment that is 
possible for them to give. Almost six months 
of preparation has been put upon many of the 
selections. This, added to the experience of 
last year, ought to make a splendid entertain- 
ment. The best talent of the College will be 
represented at this concert, as well as some 
outside talent. Now, if you have not planned 
to hear this musical, get interested at once and 
attend. To make it a success' in the full sense 
of the word, every seat should he taken, and if 
such patronage is secured it will pave the. way 
for a still greater treat next year. 

Baseball Schedule. 

Manager Kiene and General Manager Dean 
have arranged the following schedule for the 
baseball team. 

at home. 

April 2, St. Paul Association. 

April 4, Kansas Wesley an University. 

April 9, Washburn College. 

April 12, Nebraska University. 

April 16, College of Emporia. 

April 27, Ottawa University. 

May 1, Baker University. 

May 5, Kansas State Normal. 

May 17, Kansas University. 

May 22, Friends University. 

May 30, Washburn College. 

June 9, Haskell Institute. 

away from home. 

April 23, Haskell at Lawrence. 

April 24, Baker at Baldwin. 

April 25, K. U. at Lawrence. 

May 7, K. S. N. at Emporia. 

May 8, College of Emporia at Emporia. 

May 9, Washburn at Topeka. 

In addition to the above, games will prob- 
ably be arranged with Highland Park, Mis- 
souri University, and Colorado Agricultural 
College, on our home grounds. 



Life Hints 

Find your purpose and fling your life into it. 
Try to be somebody with all your might. 

What is put into the first of life is put into 
the whole of life. Start right. 

The first thing to do, if you have not done it, 
is to fall into love with your work. Necessity 
is the priceless spur. 

Do not wait for extraordinary opportunities. 
Seize common occasions and make them great. 
A great opportunity will only make you redic- 
ulous unless you are prepared for it. 

A man with an idea has ever changed the 
face of the world. — Ex. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



819 




Van is still hauling trunks. 

Don Neer went to church Sunday. 

E. K. Greenough went to Aniline last Friday. 

H. S. Records made a trip to Chicago last 
week. 

Baseball shoes, all sizes and prices. Frost & 
Davis. 

P. H. Skinner spent last Sunday at 
Lindsborg. 

Van is the only reliable trunk hauler in 
Manhattan. 

The juniors will call their class hook "The 
'07 Water Tank." 

Professor Diekens went to Kansas City, Mon- 
day, on business. 

Amer Nystrom was assisting the girls in the 
post-office Monday. 

Baseball goods— 20 styles gloves, 15 styles 
pads. Frost & Davis. 

Cheney and Connor went to Concordia Sat- 
urday to graft for the Ay. Review. 

The Websters will entertain themselves next 
Saturday evening with a banquet. 

The State game warden has sent word that 
the pheasants will arrive here this week. 

Sporting goods our line, exclusively. Bet- 
ter assortment of everything. Frost & Davis. 

The advance dairy class is now working on 
bacteriology analysis of water used in the 
dairy. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Irving, of Baker, Kan., 
visited their daughter Emma Saturday and 
Sunday. 

President Nichols will probably attend the 
K. S. A. C. alumni meeting at Kansas City 
Saturday evening. 

"Rufus Rastus Johnson Brown" has arrived 
at the Veterinary Department. He will he used 
in experimental work. 

One of the mail clerks down town says that 
she believes Professor Jackson is taking a mail 
course of spoonology. 

P. G. Crow, of Topeka, moved to Manhattan 
last week and is now at work as pressman in 
the Printing Department. 

President Nichols and Professor Willard did 
not attend the Bernhardt opera at Kansas City 
last week, as one of the city papers reported. 

Putnam, who represented K. U. in indoor 
track meet held at Kansas City last week, is 
the brother of W. M. Putnam of this College. 



Fred Lindsey was called to his home, near 
Frankfort, last Wednesday on account of the 
death of his grandfather. 

J. E. Paine, who bus been doing some spe- 
cial work in the Farm Department, has accepted 
a position in the irrigation department of the 
r. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Mrs. Oscar Erf returned from an extended 
visit with her home folks in Ohio last Sunday. 
As a result, the "smile that won't come off 1 * is 
worn once more by Professor Erf. 

Doctors Schoenleber and Barnes have evi- 
dently been having trouble with their "better 
halves' 1 lately. Each of them appeared last 
week minus their facial adornments. 

A number of army o nicer s were down from 
Ft. Riley last week to see Professor Dickens in 
regard to oiled roads. There is some talk of 
oiling all the roads on the reservation. 

Prof. O. Erf reports that the dairy meeting 
held at Concordia last Saturday was by far 
the largest meeting of its kind ever held in 
Kansas, Over 3000 people attended the meeting. 

The Printing Department is overflowing their 
cramped quarters. Every inch of space is util- 
ized and they have now begun to fill up the hall- 
way. If they keep on the Herald people will 
have to crawl in the window. 

Last week the dairy classes made about fifty 
pounds of cbeddar cheese, which will he al- 
lowed to ripen during the spring term. They 
now have several pounds of fresh cottage 
cheese for sale at 10 cents per pound. 

The Fa i*m Department is practically out of 
seed -corn. During the past two months, 300 
bushels of seed-corn and 200 bushels of small 
grain have been distributed over the State. 
About $700 have been realized from these sales. 

The College Glee Club is corresponding with 
the K. C Glee Club, with the expectation of 
exchanging dates. The K. IT. Glee Club wants 
to come here about the last of March. Watch 
out for date and make arrangements to attend 
the concert. 

Jim Cheney went to Concordia last Friday to 
doctor a sick cow, and Al. Cassell went to 
Keats Sunday at 3:41 P. M. to doctor a Felix 
domextica. Both of them were successful (in 
getting their pay) and are winning renown in 
their respective lines of practice. 

The second annual corn-judging contest will 
beheld next Saturday, in the Agricultural Hall 
at one o'clock. Each contestant will place 
every ear in twelve samples of five ears. This 
will count for 50 points. They will then rank 
two groups, which counts for 20 points. The 
remaining 30 points will be made by correctly 
placing and correctly giving oral reasons for 
the individual ranking of two samples of five 
ears each. The three upper classes and the 
second-year short-course will each be repre- 
sented by a team consisting of five men, who 
will compete for the Fielding Trophy. The 
individual sweepstake prizes will consist of $7, 
$6, $5, $4, and $3. These may be contested for 
by the individuals making up the teams, and 
some others who are members of the upper 
classes. 




m 



320 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



"Mike." 

Miss Edith Justin was out of College last week 
on account of sickness. 

Mr. Nat. C. Goodwin was out of College on 
account of illness, last week. 

Professors Eyer and Booth have charge of 
Professor Hamilton's classes. 

The side-line remarks by '"Leg" Thurston 
were a feature of the Normal basket-hall game. 

Mr. Barrett Hoklerman was absent from 
College a part of last week on account of sick- 
ness. 

Misses Hattie Evans and Ethel Somers and 
Mr. Joseph Jeter of Washington visited College 
Tuesday. 

The girls in Professor Hamilton's fourth- 
hour class sent him a hunch of carnations one 
day last week. 

The Normal basket-ball team visited chapel 
Friday morning, and mingled their college yell 
with those of K. S. A. C. 

The band boys say that they had consider- 
able trouble in keeping Assistant Jackson in 
the "straight and narrow path" on their recent 
trips. 

"Icabod" Haines, alias "Shorty," is suffer- 
ing from an attack of the mumps these days. 
Those who have seen him say that in his pres- 
ent condition he is good looking. 

People residing near the College and stu- 
dents on the street were shocked and mystified 
one day last week by a very novel sight. 
Those who saw it say that it was two "Hort" 
hoys in a hurry. No satisfactory explanation 
has been offered up to this time. 

An entertainment for the benefit of the Car- 
negie library was given in Institute Hall Mon- 
day night. Among other numbers on the pro- 
gram were orations by Miss Marcia Turner 
and Mr. C. E. Davis, and an Indian-club 
swinging exhibition by five of the gymnasium 
girls. 

The first games of the girls' basket-ball tour- 
nament were held in the gymnasium Wednes- 
day, between the freshmen and sophomores, 
and the juniors and seniors. As each team is 
to play every other team, there will be at least 
two more afternoons of playing. These games 
are set for the next two Mondays. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist, of Man- 
hattan, has a reading-room in the Fielding 
building, on North Second street. A cordial 
welcome is offered to the public. Authorized 
Christian Science literature may there be read 
and purchased. The room is open every after- 
noon except Sunday, from 2 to 5 o'clock. 

The third annual students' stock-judging con- 
test was held last Monday morning, at the 
stock- judging pavilion. About fifty students 
participated. Medals will be given to the ten 
who ranked highest. The following ten will 
receive medals in this order: first, Brown: sec- 
ond, Montgomery; third, Milham: fourth, 
Baker: fifth, Blake; sixth, Snodgrass; seventh, 
Oman; eighth, Hull; ninth, Lambert: tenth, 
W. T. McCall. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



The Kansas City Alumni Association of K. 
S. A, C. people will hold a reunion Friday 
evening. 

H. T. Nielsen, '0.1, of the Cnited States De- 
partment of Agriculture, and John Tompkins, 
senior in '03, now with the Continental Cream- 
ery Company, of Topeka, were about College 
last week. 

A letter from John F. Ross, of Genoa, Neb., 
says: M | am still teaching agriculture in the 
Indian School here and find it interesting 
work. Bt'st wishes to the Herald staff and 
all friends of the College.'' 

John Thackery, minister of the Grace M. E. 
churcli in Kansas City, Frank Thackery, In- 
dian Agent at Shawnec\ Oklahoma, and Sam 
Thackery were called home last week by the 
illness of their mother, at her home on College 
Hill. 

P. M. Biddison, '04, and Miss Cora Riddi- 
son, of Columbus, Ohio, were married at the 
bride's home, on February 18. No wonder the 
world looked so bright to Mac when he was 
writing to the Herald a few weeks ago. The 
Herald extends congratulations. 

The following from the CM) trne Daily of 
Cleburne, Texas, will be of interest to the 
friends of L. W. Fielding, »05: "Mr. L. W. 
Fielding, of Chicago, an electrical expert in 
the employ of the Cleburne automatic tele- 
phone company, is now in the city looking 
after the telephone troubles of the system. Mr, 
W. O. Osborn, the manager at this place, states 
that Mr. Fielding is going carefully over .the 
entire system of 'phones here, looking into 
their workings, and will soon have thein in 
first-class working condition. These 'phones 
have hitherto given good service, but they will 
now be much improved after the overhauling 
at the hands of Messrs. Osborn and Fielding." 

The fifth annual reunion of the Washington 
Association of the K. S A. C. Alumni was 
held at Tea Cup In^ last Friday evening. The 
special feature of the program was an old- 
fashioned literary paper, "The K. S. A. C. 
Tid-Bits" edited by Royal S. Kellogg, to 
which paper many of the alumni contributed. 
Probably no other state agricultural college, 
unless it is Michigan, is more numerously rep- 
resented in the government service than our 
own, and the chance for the renewing of old 
acquaintances is looked forward to with great 
pleasure. Those present at the reunion were: 
Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Call, M. A. Carleton, C. 
P. Hartley, W. L. Hall, C. F. Doane, L. A. 
Fit/., D. G. Fairehild, R. S. Kellogg, J. M. 
Westgate, A. S. Hitchcock, Charles Davis, D. 
E. Lantz, Miss Margaret Butterfield, Messrs. 
J, B. Norton, R. C. Butterfield, George H. 
Failyer, C. L. Marlatt. H. B. Holrovd. R. A. 
Oakley, A. B. Gahan, D. W. Randall, W. W. 
Buckley, T. E. Will. Major Morrison, Nicholas 
Sehroitz, Harry Umberger, W. R. Ballard and 
Earl Wheeler. 

Baseball practice was retarded by the heavy 
snowfall of Monday. 



m 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



321 



( 

t 

\ 



NEW CLOTHING 



NEW SHOES \ 
NEW HATS 



NEW GOODS arriving daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: :: :: :: ;: 



\ m t17 JOHN COONS, of Course 



WalkOver 

Shoes 



J 



Additional Local. 

Bicycles, bicycle repairs. Frost & Davis. 

Tennis balls, rachets and nets. Frost & 
Davis. 

Short-course students, let Van haul your 
trunks. 

The people who attended the Nashville con- 
vention returned Tuesday. 

M. R. Shuler claims the first sleigh ride of the 
season. See him tor particulars, 

Mafctie Wallace, an employee in the Printing 
Department, is entertaining a case of mumps 
this week. 

Horace Bixby, A. H. Rose and Fred Winter 
are receiving heavy consignments of mail from 
Wakefield. 

Professor Hamilton is recovering from the 
results of his fall and expects to he buck in Col- 
lege next week. 

Although last month was a short month and 
contained a holiday, the pay-roll of the Print- 
ing Department was the "biggest ever." 

The lecture course committee received word last 
week that all engagements of Edward Bok, who 
was to lecture here this month, had been can- 
celed. Another lecture will be substituted. 

If any of the hand hoys didn't make a mash 
while at Wakefield we' haven't heard of it. 
From what we can learn, those red, blue, gray 
and gold uniforms took the eyes of every girl 
in towD. 




I 



I 

I 

I 



Hats, Shirts, 
Suits. Our 
New Oxfords 
and Shoes are 

ready for your inspection. 
See our window 

and offerings (or this 
SEASON. 



j l Knostman 

L 



I 



J 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 



WE CABBY 



Headquarters for College Supplies 
A X of all Kinds X X 



Spalding Line of Baseball and Sporting Good* 
Keuttel & Esser Line of Drawing Material 
Henry Sears Line of Warranted Pocket-knives 
Waterman and Parker Lines of Fountain Pens 
Varney Fountain Pen, only $1.00. 



CALL AND SEE IS 



311 POYNTZ AVENUE 



322 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



SENIORS 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photon 
graphs made* You 
feel better, so do we, 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always In demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Wolf's Studio 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 

MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 

For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KING'S 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons, 



Walt for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GOTO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



The 2!fBgK£2. Shop L.W.TURNER 



Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cijrars and toilet 
articles, Razors honed. 



BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 113 Poyntz Ave., 



Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corn er Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Buildfnjf. . . . 

Porcelain bath tubs tine line cigars and toilet articles 



Phone 53. 



QO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. Wc 

offer you only the best. X X 

W. M. STINGLEY & CO, 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



828 



•-»_-L'...-^.-. .. »„ -■•'.'.■»'^*-» .-, »■ - »'- ». - - -' - » - 



DROP IN THE 



Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

i n «. i i iM i .. i . ■ ■ ■ — .1 . 1 

And buy your College supplies at the lowest prices. Ask to see those souvenir 
Post-cards. And don't forget that we handle Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens. 
Become a member of the Association for $1 and you /*/.—_ O //*««« Hint* 
get 5 per cent rebate on all purchases. It pays. UnuS. O. JOnGS, mffr. 



It is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 



Feed, Seeds & Fuel 



from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, flgr. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on G R. I. fir P. Ry. 

Geo* I\ Fielding & Sons- 

Office 113*15 N. Second St. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers iind Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

£! ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



7 STUDIO is the place t o get 

Jj PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :; 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Orr 



• a ■ • 



WOOD 



STUDENTS, 

GET YOUR 

of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

MANHATTAN, KAN. 

T08 H. THIRD ST. 



PHONE 6 



THE 



HERALD 

WILL GIVE 



Spicy and Complete "write-ups" of 
all the baseball games this comlngr 
spring. If you want to keep up on 
athletic events it will pay you to 
subscribe. DO IT NOW! :: :; :: 



$1 PER YEAR 



324 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



17 



«MB»4 



n 



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"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



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We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



AjL 



Phone 167 




] 



-AH Kinds of 



Oyfters 



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Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



F 



rkiinfain* Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
UUllUUU. ice CREAM SODAS 



L- 



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Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



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If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. f If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
f Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. <J Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 
Randolph and Canal StS 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filhert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

it and 11 Drumm Street. 



General Offices: 
ri Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

218 McDermet Avenue 




How the 



Fills Itself 



Just a quick, simple pressure of the thumb and Conklin's Self- 
Filling Pen is completely filled. A collapsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel of the pen compresses, and when released, instantly draws in 
the ink through the feed channels at the point, filling the Conklin 
Pen ready to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. Dis- 
penses entirely with the old-fashioned drop-filler method. So simple 
that you can't go wrong — you can't get your fingers inky, or entail 
any loss of time. The lock-ring shown in the lower left hand cor- 
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filled, either when pen is in use or in the pocket. 

The ORIGINAL and ONLY GENUINE 

Conklin's Sell-Filling Pen 

is a marvel that has completely revolutionized fountain 
pen construction. Its surprising simplicity combined with 
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trouble of any sort. Responds at the first touch to the 
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ink is exhausted. Ink capacity as large as old style 
fountain pens, yet it never overflows when in use. 
Presser-bar prevents pen from rolling off a sloping surface, 
and is so arranged as not to be in the way when writing. 
Feed channels are thoroughly cleaned in the same easy way 
as filling. All Conklin Pens are unconditionally guaran- 
teed to fulfill all claims we make. 
If your dealer does noUiandle the Conklin Pen, let us 
make you our Special Offer to Fountain Pen Users. 
Full information, with illustrated catalog, 
sent upon request. 

Sold by Dealers Eeerymhen. 




THE CONKLIN PEN CO., 

114, lit, 518 Jefferson JUe* Toledo, Ohio. 
The B. A. Mhdnd Co* It leoo* St. Sew Tut. 



rtect! 



414 Market St. 



. C.E»f- 
47 Market St.. 



■. 



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W. S. ELLIOT 






Students' Corduroy Trousers 
Yale Pattern, The Very 
Latest. -:- Price, $4.00 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING ^ 

Our Urge experience in handling student trade during many 
year* enable* us to meet then wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



#****«*«XX«s«««««WW«HE 



The Big Racked 



Stationery, Pencils, Note-books, 
Tablets, Pens and Ink, Photo 
Supplies, Room Furnishin gs 

Don't buy your Spring Embroideries and Laces until you 
see our Unequalled line. Everything in Laces from a 5-cent 
Valenciennes to the Genuine linen Torchon. Big Values in 
5-cent and 10-cent Embroideries and upwards, also Skirt and 
Corset-cover Embroidery greatly underpriced. 



* 



% 

* 
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vmmmmmmmsmmmmmmmmmm 



ill 

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^ 



x. 



3Che Students' Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kama* State Agri- 
cultural College X 2Z 








. 






■MM 



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THICK CREAM 



SELLS FOR ONE CENT MORE 
PER POUND THAN THIN CREAM 



q 



The creameries of the country have become so con- 
vinced of the increased value of thick cream over thin 
cream that many of them are paying* one cent per pound 
more for cream testimg 30 per cent and over than for that 
testing under 30 per cent. The reasons for this are: 

FIRST.— Thick cream makes better butter because It contains less 
milk and therefore keeps In better condition. SECOND.— Thick cream 
is so much less in quantity that tbe cost of transportation is less. 

It is much better for the dairyman to make thick cream, because he has more 
skimmed milk left at home to feed the calves. It then follows that dairymen should 
buy only such separators as can separate thick cream. 

The U. S. Separators Lead the World in this Particular 

Beware of the cheap and poorly constructed Separators that cannot make thick cream. 
They would be expensive even if furnished without cost. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., Bellows Falls, Vermont. 



Eighteen centrally located distributing warehouses 



throughout the United States and Canada. 



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Headaches 




If you are troubled with headaches, 
eye-aches or have trouble in reading, 
stop at Askren's, The Optician, who 
guarantees to cure these defects or it 
costs you nothing. We use no drugs 
or medicine of any kind. Absolute 
satisfaction guaranteed. :: :: :: :: 



X ASKREN 3 

THE GRADUATE OPTICIAN 




i 



I 

I 

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I 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Buses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line. 
Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for class 
parties, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :; :: :: :: :; :: 



PHONE 65 

H. J. Barnhousa -:■ L. W. Phillip* 



- 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



325 



r 



The Kansas City 



Veterinary College 




Course Thorough, Practical, Complete 



§ A NEW BUILDING 
EXTENSIVE HOSPITAL 
AMPLE LABORATORIES 
COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 
EXPERIENCED INSTRUCTORS 




Graduates eligible to positions in the United 
States Bureau of Animal Industry, the United 
States Army, and to membership in the Ameiv 
ican Veterinary Medical Association* 



u it 



I 



CATALOGUE AND OTHER INFORMATION SENT ON REQUEST 




DR S. STEWART, Secretary 



! 



L 



1336 East 15th Street, 



Kansas City, Mo, 



J 



826 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



JT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




New Laces. 

New White Goods, 

All-over Embroideries 
Waists. 



Tor 



A mon * the NEW SILKS we 
have a (Jilt Edge Taffeta, wear 
guaranteed, 27 inches wide, for 
75 cents a yard. This is a beau- 
tiful soft silk suitable for waists 
and suits. We hare it in Gray, 
Alice Blue. Reseda, Black and 
White. 

Cbtllon Taffetas, 27 inches 
wide, all colors, 91.00. 

Black and White check Taf- 
feta, 36 inches wide, $1,00. 



Black and Gray stripe Taffeta, 
36 inches wide, $1.00. 

NEW SPRING WALKING 
and DRESS SKIRTS in a va- 
riety of different styles and ma- 
terials. 

NOBBY JACKETS in Covert 
and fancy mixtures, in all the 
new styles. 

See our *5.00 Jacket. 

New things i n Cravenette 
Coats. 

Ladies' and Children'* Muslin 
Underwear at popular prices. 



McCall Patterns, 10 cents and 
15 cents. None higher. 

Krippendorff-Dittmann Co. 'a 
Ladies' and Misses' Shoes, none 
as good for the price. 



LA DIES' 
SLIPPERS. 



GYMNASIUM 



EVERYTHING IN HARD- 
WARE. 



BEST GROCERIES 
LOWEST PRICES. 



AT 



urdock's Coffees. 
O. P. T. Extracts. 
Manhattan Baking Powder. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready- to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



CALL AT 



The LEADER 



AND BUY YOUR 

OXFORDS 

THEY HAVE ONE OF 
THE LARGEST STOCK 
OF SHOES IN MANHAT- 
TAN, AND SELL FOR 
CASH, THEREFORE 



Prices Always Right 



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THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 



PROFESSIONAL. 



DB. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should he convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOK, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormlck, Dentist 

Room ifl' Union National Bank Building 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhe Students Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MotnorLietEveryOnecmtivateHis Own Genius 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., March 15, 1906. 



Number 25 



To Nashville and Return. 

At the uncanny hour of mid-night, February 
27. eleven fortunate students of K. S. A. C. 
said good-bye to a few not so fortunate who 
had gathered to speed us on our way. 

When Kansas City was reached it had been 
hroad daylight for hours. In a short time we 
joined the ninety delegates from other Kansas 
colleges, hoarded a special train resplendant 
with yellow streamers and sunflowers, and were 
whisked out to the plains and hills of Mis- 
souri. We each procured a sunflower for a 
badge and began to get acquainted. Soon, 
however, the beautiful scenery along the Osage 
river attracted our attention to the world out- 
side, the train. Tall cliffs, many-hued and 
gleaming, could be seen across the river, while 
on our side the broad valley with its fertile 
farms was a welcome reminder of Kansas. 
Final lv we tired of the river and climbed over 
a succession of low bills, covered with the 
inevitable Jack-oak scrub, with neat valleys 
between. We now come to our first tunnel, 
and some one started "'Alma Mater.' 1 Thus 
the custom was established, and at every 
tunnel thereafter, including Mammoth Cave, 
we sang our College song. This was our way 
of measuring approximately their lengths. 

After we tired of tunnels and hills we sud- 
denly shot through a deep cut onto the bridge 
spanning the beautiful Gasconade, which flows 
as blue and clear as the sky one hundred three 
feet below the rails. The little village of 
Gascondy lies just across the bridge. The 
names remind one of Europe and romances. 
There is a romance which amounted to almost 
a tragedy on our return trip. 

The sun, tired of showing us the landscape, 
left us in twilight and in darkness. However, 
I suspect the remainder of Missouri is common- 
place and that there was no more to see any- 
way. 



St. Louis was soon left behind and we were 
slumbering on the way across corners of Illi- 
nois and Indiana, through Kentucky into Ten- 
nessee, and awoke, in time to see the spires and 
smoke of Nashville. We alighted in the beau- 
tiful union depot and went to the registration of- 
fice for our Convention tickets and assignments 
to the homes of the hospitable southerners. 

Nashville is dirty and smoky. Her hand- 
some buildings were once almost white, but now 
behold them grimy and streaked with soot. 
And one continually meets hugh Hakes of the 
same floating in the air, the result of factories 
and a universal use of soft coal. There cannot 
be four walls in Tennessee without a fireplace. 
The best the city has was ours, though, and the 
wish of the people seemed to be: " Y'uall won't 
be sorry yu evah came heah." 

Nashville teemed witli the. five thousand stu 
dents, professors, missionaries, statesmen and 
reporters from seven hundred institutions of 
higher learning in the United States and 
Canada, twenty-six miss ion- lands and every 
foreign country, who were there for the. Con- 
vention. 

The meetings were most impressive. The 
leaders and speakers were men who appeal to 
representatives of the highest type of progress, 
the college student body. These men would he 
leaders anywhere, and they have given their 
lives that the motto and watchword of the 
Student Volunteer Movement— "The Evange- 
lization of the World in this Generation" 
may be accomplished. There was nothing 
fanatical nor any undue excitement evident, 
I) ut the earnestness of that vast body filled 
all witli enthusiasm. The stories of the needs 
of the world as told by people who have seen 
and know is a revelation to us who know so 
little of the true condition. 

With all the hurry of meetings and sight 
seeing the time soon passed and Sunday night 



328 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



we sought rest in our " uppers" and "lowers" 
to awake at Glasgow, Ky. Before breakfast 
we boarded a remodeled street car attached to 
a wheezy little engine for a nine-mile ride to 
Mammoth Cave. The fare was so high, how- 
ever, that a new engine may be purchased with 
our contribution. The cave here calls for a 
long list of superlative adjectives, but space 
forbids. We spent six hours there and re- 
sumed our journey passing the same scenes as 
when outward bound. We were still with the 
other Kansans on our homeward journey, and 
it was then that the K. S. A. C. delegation was 
christened the "Happy Family" and it seemed 
not inappropriate. 

The romance of Gascondy was not a tragedy. 
We arrived there at 3:30 p. m. and took lunch 
(we had our last meal twenty-four hours be- 
fore ), so the tragedy was averted. 

A delay of two hours in muddy "Old Mis- 
souri" was spent pleasantly that evening, with 
an impromptu program given by Kansans. In 
Kansas City again we spent a forenoon sight 
seeing, including a thorough inspection of 
Swift & Co's. packing house. Again on the 
train, it was only a short time till Bluemont 
and the water tank were sighted, and it was 
with no little joy that the "Happy Family" 
stepped on familiar ground once more. 

C. E. Whipple. 



Choral Union Concert 

The second annual concert of the Choral 
t'nion took place last Thursday evening in the 
College Auditorium. The attendance was fairly 
good but the number of students who attended 
was not as large as it should have been. 
About $400 was cleared on the concert, how- 
ever, and this sum will be equally divided be- 
tween the Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A. and 
the Choral Union. 

We feel hardly able to criticise the music. 
To us it seemed that the singing of the Choral 
Union was much better than last year. The 
union has a larger membership and the mem- 
bers have evidently not been sparing in the 
time necessary for practice. The Hallelujah 
Chorus seemed to be the most satisfactory 
number given by them, although every selec- 
tion was favorably received. Their singing of 
Alma Mater at the close of the program came 
as a pleasant surprise. The accompaniment 
of Miss Hilliard was the best we have ever 
heard. 

The orchestra has also made wonderful im- 
provement during the past year. Both of their 
overtures at the concert were excellent. The 
members and the leader deserve much com- 
mendation for their faithful and consistent 



practice. The Glee Club sang "When the 
Corn is Waving." This was so much appre- 
ciated that a response was given. In this they 
were assisted by Professor Valley, who sang 
the principal part. We have heard many fa- 
vorable remarks about the vocal solos ren- 
dered. Mr. E. C. Farrar sang, "Rolling in 
Foaming Billows." Professor Valley, Charles 
Sherman, Florence Sweet and Gertrude Eakin 
each sang a solo from Faust. Professor 
Kammeyer made a few explanatory remarks 
on Faust which fully . accomplished their 
purpose and gave to the program a rounded 
fullness which increased its charm. The audi- 
ence was much better able to understand and 
appreciate the solos which followed. 

The instrumental solos by Miss Augspurger, 
on the piano, and Miss Lindskog, on the 
•violin, were perhaps the most satisfactory 
numbers given. Each responded to an encore. 
Miss Augspurger's solos were most beautiful 
and will undoubtedly add to her reputation as 
a pianist. The numbers commanded absolute 
quiet over the whole audience which is tribute 
enough for them. 

The Musical Department may well be proud 
of the music given at the concert. Professor 
Valley and his assistants deserve much praise 
for their untiring efforts, and it is hoped that 
the students will learn to appreciate more and 
more the efforts that are being made by these 
instructors. We will look forward to next 
year's concert feeling confident that there will 
be as much improvement in the next year as 
there has been in the past. 



Qirls' Basket-Ball Tournament. 

The second series of games took place last 
Monday, the seniors playing the juniors and 
the sophomores playing the freshmen. The re- 
sults were the same as in the first two games — 
the seniors and sophomores won. Both the 
senior and junior teams had made considerable 
improvement in their playing, but the sopho- 
more and freshmen teams played just about the 
same as before. 

The first half of the sophomore- freshman 
game ended 7 to 3 in favor of the sophomores. 
The final score was 18 to 11. Miss Hassebroek 
and Miss Tolin both did good work for the 
sophomores, while Miss Leuszler and Miss 
Selby were the freshmen stars. 

The seniors were ahead of the juniors 
throughout their game. The first half ended 9* 
to 4 in favor of the '06' s, and the final score 
was 16 to 11. Miss Murphy and Miss Lyman 
for the 06' s and Miss Cole and Miss Cunning- 
ham for the '07 '■ did the best playing. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



329 



Opie Read. 
The cancelling of all western engagements 
by Edward Bok left a vacant date on our lec- 
ture course program, which was filled last Sat- 
urday evening by Opie Read. The storm cut 
down the attendance to a great extent, but a 
fairly good-sized audience was present at the be- 
ginning to "cheer up" the speaker when he ap- 
peared. The evening's entertainment consisted 
of readings from Mr. Read's work and of char- 
acter sketches of people he had met. 

Mr. Read is a large man, of rather unkempt 
appearance, but he is an excellent story teller. 
He speaks in a voice that is easily heard and 
his peculiar southern accent is not at all un- 
pleasant. His stories were mostly of southern 
people and of southern life. Many of them 
were humorous, and all were original. They 
entertained for awhile, but in a short time they 
will probably be forgotten. Some of them, 
however, will be remembered for a longer time. 
The story of the Kentucky fued was certainly 
tine. More than one eye in the audience was 
filled with tears as the speaker told of the 
making and the breaking of the oath. The de- 
piction of three interesting phases of negro 
character, the philosophical, the tragical, and 
the diplomatical, was also good. 

As a whole, we believe that the lecture was 
satisfactory. In most of it there was nothing 
that was particularly elevating, but Mr. Read 
did all that was promised. He entertained us 
and gave us a closer knowledge of his works 
and himself. 



Ionian. 

The Ionians were called to order by Vice- 
Pres. Odessa Dow. After singing, with Ger- 
trude Lill as pianist, Anna Harrison led in 
devotion. The first number of the program 
was music, by Kate Hutchinson, who intro- 
duced her sister to the society, who gave us a 
pleasing vocal solo which received a hearty 
encore. The "Oracle," read by Ethel Mc- 
Donald, was excellent. Mabel Dana gave as a 
miscellaneous, "A Senior- Junior Spelling- 
match," which was victorious for the juniors. 
Perhaps the seniors could spell if they had 
time to think. Miss Lane, accompanied by 
Miss Carnahan, rendered another of her good 
violin solos, which we were glad to hear. We 
were very fortunate to have some visitors ap- 
pear on our program this week, and one of 
these was Mr. Kittell's brother who furnished 
us a very good vocal solo, to which he re- 
sponded with an encore. Business session was 
short but lively. Our critic, Ethel Berry, then 
told us our good and bad qualities, after 
which we adjourned. K. B. 



Girls' Basket-ball Tournament 
The first two games in the inter-class basket- 
ball tournament were held last Wednesday. 
The juniors went down in defeat before the 
sophomores, while the seniors upheld their dig- 
nity by winning from the freshmen. 

The game between the '07 's and '08's was the 
first to be played. This game was rather one- 
sided, and at no time, except at the beginning, 
was there any doubt as to who would win. The 
score at the end of the first half was: sopho- 
mores 13, juniors 0. In the second half the 
juniors did a little better, but they were de- 
feated just the same. The final score was 18 to 
5 in favor of the sophomores. Miss Hawkins 
was easily the star, getting seven goals from 
the field. Miss Cunningham did the best work 
for the juniors. 

The second game was between the seniors and 
freshmen. The first half ended with the score 7 
to 3 in favor of the '09' s. The seniors took the 
lead in the second half, however, and the game 
ended 15 to 8 in their favor. Miss Murphy did 
fine work, making every point for the seniors. 
Miss Leuszler and Miss Selbly did good work 
for the freshmen. 

Herald Election. 

It has happened ; our days of anxiety are 
over; no more will we lay awake nights think- 
ing of some one to carry on the Herald work. 
A man has been found who is willing to for- 
sake the pleasures of College in order that he 
may edit the Herald. That man is C. E. 
Whipple. Future generations will look" back 
on his memory with reverence and awe and 
think of him as "The Man of Destiny." To 
assist Mr. Whipple in his arduous work, to 
help him in defending the office in case of an 
invasion, to help quiet all angry professors 
and students, and to stir up the delinquent sub- 
scribers, the following staff officers were also 
elected : Local editor, L. E. Gaston, '08 ; busi - 
ness manager, G. C. Kahl, '07 ; literary editor, 
May Grifflng, '07 ; subscription manager, J. E. 
Brock, '08 ; associate business manager, H. R. 
Hillman, '07. 

y. w. a A. 

Officers have been nominated for the new 
year of association work. They are as follows: 
President, Flora Hull; vice-president, Mar- 
garet Cunningham; treasurer, Ethel McDonald: 
secretary, V. Brooks. Election takes place 
Wednesday noon at 12:30 in south society hall. 

The Nashville delegates gave their report to 
the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. jointly Sunday af- 
ternoon at the Congregational church. They 
also reported to the various churches, either at 
the regular morning or evening services. 



880 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




M»TT»; LCTCVEAV 
One Cultivate Hi* 
Own Geniu*. •+■ 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies. Hve cents. 

F. A. Kienk. Jr. .'06 .. Editor-in-chief 

(Jhovhk Kafil. '07..... Business Manager 

E. C. Fakkah. 07 Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08 Local Editor 

S. W. Cunnincham, 'OH Exchange Editor 

C. E. Whipplk. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S, Montoomkhy. *07 Subscription Manager 

QUACK HAWKINS. '08 » A<w t.opii1 Editors 

A. O. PHILLIPS. W f ASHOC ' lj ° Cal MUors 

Elizarkth KWKKT. '04 Alumni Editor 

Jas. R. Coxkn, 'OH Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions und inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Swrkt. '01. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Mar. 15, 1906. 




DITQRIA rg^/ 



We take pleasure in announcing that the 
editorship and management of the Herald for 
the coining year goes to Mr. E. C. Whipple 
and 11. ('. Kahl. With this infusion of new 
Mood and enthusiasm every one should look 
for good things without number. 



We are glad to add our word of approval 
and commendation to the many expressions of 
appreciation which are being showered upon 
the Choral Union at present. Its effort this 
year has been most successful and the same 
calls for even more general support in the 
future. There were not as many students in 
attendance at the program as we should liked 
to have seen. Every student in College should 
at least lend his presence and personal interest 
to the success of the musical endeavor at this 
institution. If one has not musical ability he 
can at least cultivate a taste for {food music, 
and one who cannot appreciate harmony of 
tone is undeveloped on one score at least. If 



he does not care, for music in the least, one 
may look with suspicion upon him, for such 
sentiment is a brand of coarseness and vul- 
garity. 

It may occur to many that the editor exer- 
cises very poor taste in making the follow- 
ing comments, but however that may be his 
thought is not that of bettering his own condi- 
tion but of giving a thread which may in the 
future l>e followed up with general benefit to 
the College and all concerned with it. In the 
past it has l>een the practice for the senior 
class to issue what is called a class book. The 
book has always been exclusively of, by, and 
for the senior class, with no thought of mak- 
ing it a popular edition. This latter idea was 
carried out to some degree last year. This 
practice is decidedly un modern and the sooner 
the custom is dropped here the better it will be 
for all concerned. To get out a book fairly 
representative of the College and the students 
requires a resource of at least fifteen hundred 
dollars. This can only be secured by issuing 
a popular annual at a popular price. For in- 
stance, 12iH> books at +1.25 for each would 
bring the result with no serious expense en- 
tailed upon any one. The result would be a 
hook far in advance of anything ever gotten 
out here, a popular hook for every one and a 
far greater return to the College than could 
otherwise be secured from the publishing of an 
annual. In eastern schools the annuals are 
usually published by the junior class, repre- 
senting the school and all concerned with it in 
some such manner as I have suggested. It 
would l)e well in the future for the classes here 
to consider the subject of annuals, with a view 
to making them College productions rather 
than class. Our annual catalogue is a very poor 
advertising agent forthe school, and it is certain 
that great results could be obtained by a ref- 
ormation in the work of publishing our College 
annuals. 

Eurodetphians. 

The program opened with a lullaby by Hallie 
Smith, in which Leona Moore very ably repre- 
sented Aunt Chloe rocking Lady Amabel Me- 
hitahel (label Cathoun to sleep. The debate, 
in which Lulu Rannells was on the affirmative 
and Louise Fielding the negative, was resolved 
in favor of the negative, that there is more 
pleasure in realization than in anticipation. 
Then followed a recitation by Mabel Bower, a 
vocal solo by Miss Edwards and a book review 
by Etta Carlton. The program closed with the 
reading of the "Delphi'- by Marie Coons. 

After a short recess we had a lively and in- 
teresting business session. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



331 




Let Van haul your trunks. 
Have you tried the rink yet? 



i 



Van is the only reliahle trunk man in Man- 
hattan. 

"Nystrom. the funnyman, has a joke in every 
pocket." 

Mrs. Calvin and Miss Lena Finley went to 
Topeka Monday. 

W. W. McLean is authority for the statement 
that spring has arrived. 

C F. Ulake's father was visiting him last 
Wednesday and Thursday. 

Victor Oman was confined to his room on 
account of illness last week. ■ fl 

Miss Kate Hutchinson enjoyed a few days' 
visit from her sister last week. 

Mr. F. A. Marlatt treated his Sunday-school 
class to a sleigh ride Tuesday night. 

Charles Sherman's mother came from Kan- 
sas City last week to attend the concert. 

Carl Kipp left Sunday night to take up his 
work in the Colorado Agricultural College. 

Two- fifths of the '07 Water Tank committee 
hold regular sessions several times a week. 

R. K. Evans mashed his thumb quite badly, 
while at work with the paper cutter, one day 
last week. : 

Miss Edith Morrow visited with her sister, 
Miss Kffle Morrow, from Thursday till Monday 
last week. , 

Miss Jewel McKee. of Blue Rapids, came 
down to attend the concert and to spend a week 
with friends. 

Janitor Lewis remembered what happened 
last year and carried a lantern with him all of 
the time last Thursday evening. 

Mr. A. H. Sanderson, '03, visited with his 
sister, Miss Pearl Sanderson, and renewed old 
acquaintances a few days last week. 

The March number of the Jaykawker came out 
last week. The new editors seem to' be^up to 
snuff" and are putting out a good paper. 

A former student writing to a friend here 1 
says "The people here in Nickerson do nut 
know that America has been discovered." 

Did you notice that just as soon as Professor 
Karameyer began to speak the other 'night at 
the musical that the pipes began to pound. 

One of the D. S. seniors has become so ex- 
pert in the art of dressmaking as to be able to 
sew a button on an overcoat in the dark. 



Another"" number of" the 'C." D.'B. lecture 
course, a lecture by. Dr. McGurk, wq,s given at 
the Congregational church Monday evening. 

Mr. W. E. Harkness, from the Western 
Eleetrie Com p'any, writes Professor Eyar that 
he expects to visit the department the last of 
this month. ,,■, ,_ . r .-, . 4 . . 

Professor Kammeyer has h new "call' 1 for 
country dances which, he gave , to one of his 
classes the other, da, y, I .t b> '.' Forward all, three 
q mi'ters round me rafters "awing." 

A number of seniors w-i}l. finish their. Col- 
lege work this term. Among them are E. J. 
Evans, D. H; Gripton."E.' K; Greenotigh, M. 
D. Snodgrass,* and Rennie Greene.- *J 

James Howard' and Raymond Harrison are 
in training, preparing for an expedition ..to the 
North Pole. Earjy Sundaymorningthe.y made 
a flying trip to the top of 'BTuemont and hack. 

The dairy department has ordered two new 
milking niachines, to he used in the dairy barn. 
Each machine will milk two cows at a time. 
A small gasoline engine will furnish the -power. 

Prof. A, j! Beatty, superintendent of the 
Wamego schools, came up to the College 
Saturday, with several of the high school 
seniors, who expect to take the engineering 
course here next'year. i£ 

The Misses Harri entertained in honor of 
their brother,-Mr. ■ Fritz Harri, at their home 
on Vattier street, Monday evening. All pres- 
ent thoroughly enjoyed the evening and will 
be sorry to lose these young people, who do 
not expect to be "m. College next term. 

The Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing 
Company lias written to Professor Eyer for 
four electrical engineers from this year's grad- 
uating^ ass. The first western men this com- 
pany has employed are R. A, Carle and R. 
A. Fulton, of last year'.s class. Evidently the 
company was not disappointed in the engineers 
sent out from the course here.- 

Fairbanks, Morse , & Co. have sent to the 
electrical engineering, department two gasoline 
engine electric generator outfits to be tested for 
their adaptability and efficiency for small 
electric-light " plants. Several of the senior 
engineers will work out their theses on this 
subject, ■ 

Mr. A. G. Wessling, engineer with the Bul- 
lock Electrical Manufacturing Company, of 
Cincinatti, will- visit the Electrical Engineering 
Department and lecture 4.o the Rngineers Asso- 
ciation March -'17. He expects to interview 
members of this year's class with a view to 
giving them employment with the company. 

The Athletic Association has a hard kick to 
register on the way Mr'. Anderson is running 
the weather while Professor Hamilton is away 
from College; The first of the baseball games 
will take place in less than three weeks, and 
yet Mr. Anderson has given us no good weather 
in which . to practice. Professor Hamilton 
would have thought of this and arranged for 
better atmospheric conditions, hut Mr, Ander- 
son bas not dope .so. This may be due to an 
. oversight, (jn his .part, but to us it looks as 
though he wanted to show people who is "hoss." 



T 



332 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



> 



Van is still hauling 1 trunks. 

Richard Getty went to Topeka Monday. 

Good room to rent at 917 Osage street. Elec- 
tric light. 

W. G. Milligan was visited by his sister 
Madge, of Olathe, last week. 

D. H. Zook's father and mother, of Carrol- 
ton, 111., are visiting him this week. 

F. B. Mil liken, who left College some time 
ago, will not return again this year. 

The Herald appears one day late this week 
on account of the rush in the printing-office. 

Professor Me Fa Hand received word Tuesday 
morning of the death of his sister, in Ohio. 

The H. C. Club met after chapel one morning 
last week. Carl Mallon was president pro tern. 

H. A. Kittell, of McPherson, came up for the 
concert and visited with his brother for a few 
days. 

F. A. Barnett was showing his brother-in- 
law, of Fremont, Neb., around College last 
Saturday. 

Russel Cave sprained his fore-foot Thurs- 
day while jumping from the main steps of the 
Main building. 

E. C. and Eva Farrar enjoyed a short visit 
from their sister Mina, who attended the con- 
cert last Thursday. 

A. N. H. Beeman orders his Herald sent to 
410 Hall building, Kansas City, Mo. He is 
now associate editor of the Mixmuri and Kan- 
hos Farmer. 

Roller skating at the city Auditorium every 
night except Thursday. Richardson's ball- 
bearing skates used. Perfect order maintained. 
A. L. Kyner, manager. 

The Herald editor has petitioned Congress- 
man Calderhead to work to have the excessive 
tariff on linotypes removed. The Herald will 

z purchase about ten of these machines if this is 

* done. 

> 

Season tickets for the baseball games will be 
placed on sale next week. The price will be 
£1.50. A rebate of twenty-five cents will be 
given members of the Athletic Association and 
of the Rooters' Club. 

Harry Heim and E. A. Wright are rewinding 
the armature of the dynamo that "blew up" 
about a year ago while running the ventilating 
fan. They will put it in complete running 
order and make it part of their thesis work. 

R. H. Shaw came down from the University 
of Nebraska last Saturday. He is working on 
an experiment on bleaching flour. He came 
down for the purpose of using the small mill in 
the Station here. He will return home next 
week. 

President Coxen presided at the stockholders' 
meeting last Friday with his usual grace and 
dignity. His remarks were interesting and in- 
structive. B. H. Wilbur gathered in the 
ballots with his "rooky" cap. He was as- 
sisted by F. A. Kiene, who asxed for permis- 
sion to help. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Florence Phillips, sophomore last year, was 
about College last week. 

Professor Anderson went up the Blue, Satur- 
day, "to visit home folks," he said. 

G. H. Wilson, '05, who is farming near Win- 
field, was up for the concert last week. 

Garfield Shirley, '05, left his farm work near 
Newman long enough to attend the concert last 
Thursday. 

A. H. Sanderson, '03, a prosperous farmer 
near Marysville, attended the concert at his 
alma mater last Thursday. 

Hattie Forsyth, '04, came up from her home 
near Dwight last week for a visit with her sis- 
ter, Edith, of the senior class. 

Margaret Haggart, '05, who is conducting a 
private school of domestic science in Topeka. 
was visiting Manhattan friends' a few davs last 
week. 

W. O. Gray, '04, student and assistant in 
chemistry at the Kansas City Medical College, 
went from there as a delegate to the convention 
at Nashville. 

Fred Wilson, '05, head of the department of 
animal husbandry of the Arizona Experiment 
Station, was visiting friends in Manhattan and 
home folks in Hill City last week. He returned 
to Arizona Tuesday. 

Professor Hamilton is back with his classes 
this week. 

Ross Sweet was washing dishes for the Ex- 
periment Station Monday morning. . 

At the State oratorical contest held at Ottawa 
last week the college of Emporia won first 
place, Ottawa second, southwest Kansas college 
third. 

Prof. O. Valley went hunting Tuesday morn- 
ing while in Wakefield, and killed two rabbits. 
His face has been one wreath of smiles ever 
since. 

The College Glee Club, accompanied by Karin 
Lindskog, violinist, O. Valley, basso, Gertrude 
Eakin, soprano, and Gertrude Hilliard, accom- 
panist, gave a concert at Wakefield last Mon- 
day evening. The weather being very cold, 
the audience was not large, but it was very 
appreciative to say the least, every number on 
the program being encored. The hit of the 
evening was made when the Glee Club gave a 
selection by means of a "Jug Band" and 
encoring it with "Gasoline." The boys were 
given splendid treatment by the management at 
Wakefield, and feel gladly repaid for their 
excellent personal conduct. To prove that the 
concert was a success, the management an- 
nounces that the Glee Club has been invited to 
return to Wakefield in May. The organization 
is to be congratulated, and we all hope that it 
will meet with equal success on its future trips 
this spring. They have made arrangements 
for an exchange of concerts with the K. U. Glee 

7 71 » U * to a PP ear in Manhattan on 
April 2. 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



333 



* 

\ 



NEW CLOTHING 



NEW SHOES ' 
NEW HATS f 



NEW GOODS arriving daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: :: :: :: :: 



15£" JOHN COONS, of Course w t%" j 



Domestic Science Association. 

The Domestic Science Association met Tues- 
day, March 6, at 3:30 P. M., in Kedzie Hall. 
Professor Eyer #ave a very interesting lecture 
on the use ..of electricity in the home, illus- 
trating it by means of apparatus. The juniors 
had been previously invited to join, and a 
large number were present. No papers were 
presented and no business coming up, adjourn- 
ment followed the lecture. M. s. 



A, B s» 

The Alpha Beta program Saturday was 
something like this: A declamation by Mr. 
Page, then a paper by Miss Allenthorp, in 
which she related a true story of the trials and 
tribulations of a Kansas ' 'school-marm." Mr. 
McKee told us how he licked the teacher in his 
younger days, Miss McKeeman read some ex- 
tracts from a real diary kept by a prominent 
A. B M Miss Wendel gave a very interesting 
and instructive lecture on character reading 
from handwritings. Miss Eva Alspaugh pro- 
duced a very interesting and well-written num- 
ber of the "Gleaner," and Miss Mollie Lane 
rendered some very classical violin music, ac- 
companied by Miss Carnahan. 

The greater part of the time after recess was 
spent in trying "Tommy" White for nonper- 
formance of duty. He was found not guilty 
and the society adjourned. M. G. s. 

The Glee Club will get its picture taken next 
week for the senior class book, and for adver- 
tising purposes. 



r 



IOI WB* 



"1 



I Spring Styles ' 



i 



i 

i 



i 



m 



Hats, Shirts, 
Suits. Our 
New Oxfords 
and Shoes are 

ready (of your inspection 
See our window 



and offering! for this 
SEASON. 



j l Knostman 
l I 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 



-WB CABET- 



Headquarters for College Supplies 
X X of all Kinds X X 



Spalding Line of Baseball and Sporting Goods 
Ke utt el & Eager Line of Drawing Material 
Eastman's Kodak and Photographic Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 
Varnev Fountain Pen, only $1.00. 



CALL AND SEE US 



311 POYNTZ AVENUE 



334 



• : 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



!£= 



>*> . '* . ..'■ 







V t 



: 



-t 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photo 
graphs made.. You 
feel better, so do we. 



Wolf's Studio 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

i i ■ — — . 

PHONE 



33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KING'S 

The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

t ; — 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line ol cigars and toilet, 
articles. Razors honed. 

BARNEY VOUNOGAMP, Prop. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

' THE BARB ERS 

. On Third Street, in Union Na- 

,;-, r fionfll Bank*Buildinjr. " .#* .-> .• % 

Porcelain bath tubs tine line cigars and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
ol telegraph schools in America. ' Kn- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in den mi id. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 



Cincinnati, O. 
Ga., La Cros 



Buffalo, 1ST. Y., Atlanta, 
■rosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

< RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 
SIX BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 



n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. JC 2£ 

W; M. STINGLEY & CO. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 

I ll l l ' 



335 



THE 



Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

Is the place to buy all your College Supplies for the spring term. By experi- 
ence this has been eon finned. We handle both new and second-hand books. Also 
drawing sets, drawing paper, stationery, note-books, pencils, and Fountain Pens, 
etc., etc. Hours: 7 to 8:30 a. m. and 12 in. to 6:15 p. m. 



> ooooo ooo ooooo oooooocoo oj 



It is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, rigr. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

deaKrin 
FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



• ST UMP i s the place to get 

J) PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: :: 



Orr 



North side of Poyntz Avenue 



STUDENTS, 

GET YOUR 



WOOD 



of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

DUAKir A MANHATTAN, KAM, 

r nvl«L W 706 N. THIRD ST. 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. fr P. Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons. 



SEEDS 



Office 11345 N. Second St. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

42 ENGEL BROTHERS 



^^^— ^»w 



THE 



HERALD 

WILL C I VE 



Spicy and Complete "write-ups" of 
all the baseball games this coming 
spring. If you want to keep up on 
athletic events It will pay you to 
subscribe. DO IT NOW! :: :; :: 



$1 PER YEAR 



W- 



■ 



336 



r 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



!■ VI 



71 



i 



I 



L- 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



Jt±. 



Phone 167 




i 



Ml Kinds of 



Ice C 



ream 



OySters 



TV- 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 






h- * Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink line. Finest 
OUOiaill. ICE CREAM SODAS 



I 



J 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



fl 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. <J If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
^ Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. <][ Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 
1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drunim Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 



How the 



IBMIIHt 



Fills Itself 



I 



■ 



B 



H 



Just a quick, simple pressure of the thumb and Conklin' s Self- 
Filling Pen is completely filled. A collapsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel of the pen compresses, and when released, instantly draws in 
the ink through the feed channels at the point, filling the Conklin 
Pen ready to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. Dis- 
penses entirely with the old-fashioned drop-filler method. So simple 
that you can't go wrong — you can't get your fingers inky, or entail 
any loss of time. The lock-ring shown in the lower left hand cor- 
ner prevents the ink from being forced out after reservoir has been 
filled, either when pen is in use or in the pocket. 

The ORIGINAL and ONLY GENUINE 

Conklin's Self-Filling Pen 

is a marvel that has completely revolutionized fountain 
pen construction. Its surprising simplicity combined with 
utmost care in manufacture, makes it practically proof to 
trouble of any sort. Responds at the first touch to the 
paper — flows evenly and regularly until the last drop of 
ink is exhausted. Ink capacity as large as old style 
fountain pens, yet it never overflows when in use. 
Presser-bar prevents pen from rolling off a sloping surface, 
and is so arranged as not to be in the way when writiug. 
Feed channels are thoroughly cleaned in the same easy way 
as filling. All Conklin Pens are unconditionally guaran- 
teed to fulfill all claims we make. 
If your dealer does noUhandle the Conklin Pen, let us 
make you our Special Offer to Fountain Pen Users, 
Full information, with illustrated catalog, 
sent upon request. 

Sold by Dealers l^erymhere. 



m 



9 1 .. - -« 



Z&&.. 



. . 



£3 



&£ 



THE CONKLIN PEN CO., 

514,516,518 Jefferson Ave., Toledo, Ohio. 

The E. A. Wllhelml Co.. 93 Beade St.. New York. 

Delaell Bros.. 1652 Curtis St., Denver. 

Cardlncll -Vincent Co.. 414 Market St., 

San Francisco. 

American Agencies, Ltd., 39 Shoe Lane, 

Fleet St., London. E. C. Eng. 

Hae, Munn & Gilbert, 47 Market St.. 

Melbourne, Aust. 



WESfed 



-a 



i 



I J 



\ 




MiBBBBBMBBBBBBtlBBiiaiBBMIllBBt 



W. S. ELLIOT 



Students' Corduroy Trousers 
Yale Pattern, The Very 
Latest. -:- Price, $4.00 



S 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING * x 

Our large experience in handling itudent trade during ninny 
years enable* us to meet their wants exactly. X, X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



***********^^^ 



* 






s 

I 

* 
X 

* 

* 



The Big Racked 



Stationery, Pencils, Note-books, 
Tablets, Pens and Ink, Photo 
Supplies, Room Furnishings 

Don't buy your Spring Embroideries and Laces until you 
see our Unequalled Line. Everything in Laces from a 5-cent 
Valenciennes to the Genuine Linen Torchon. Big Values in 
5-cent and 10-cent Embroideries and upwards, also Skirt and 
Corset-cover Embroidery greatly underpriced. 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

s 



******K«****sx*w****s«*«*x*KSjis*i 



It-** 



>i 



= 



%hz Students' Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 



{ 



■ I 














i 



-■ 



•Pi 



r 



i 




THICK CREAM 



SELLS FOR ONE CENT MORE 
PER POUND THAN THIN OREAM 



q 



The creameries of the country have become so con- 
vinced of the increased value of thick cream over thin 
cream that many of them are paying 1 one cent per pound 
more for cream testimg 30 per cent and over than for that 
testing under 30 per cent. The reasons for this are: 

FIRST.— Thick cream makes better butter because it contains less 
milk and therefore keeps in better condition. SECOND.— Thick cream 
Is so much less in quantity that the cost of transportation is less. 

It is much better for the dairyman to make thick cream, because he has more 
skimmed milk left at home to feed the calves, It then follows that dairymen should 
buy only such separators as can separate thick cream. 

The U. S. Separators Lead the World in this Particular 

Beware of the cheap and poorly constructed Separators that cannot make thick cream. 
They would be expensive even if furnished without cost. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., Bellows Falls, Vermont. 



Eighteen centrally located distributing warehouses 



throughout the United States and Canada. 



!. 



71 



I 
i 

i 



1! 



-It 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, fl*r. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



STUDENTS, 

GET YOUR 



WOOD 



of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 



PHONE 6 



MANHATTAN. KAN. 

70« N. THIRD rr. 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line, 

Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for class 
parties, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: :: :: :: ;: a 



H. J. Barnhouse 



PHONE 65 



L. W. Phillips 



SUPPLEMENT. 



THE 



'06 BANNER 



i 



i 



^ II WILL be made a College Annual, 
M J | this year, rather* than a class book 
.JJ and will be of interest to every one 
connected with the College or interested in it in 
any way. The book will contain 200 pages, 
printed in two colors. <| Every phase of Col- 
lege life and activity will be treated in an inter- 
esting and novel manner. 4| College history 
will be compiled and issued as never before. 
College views given special attention. Some- 
thing of value to all Alumni of the College will 
be included. •} The book wiD be bound in 
cloth and will be ready for distribution May 
20th at the least possible cost to all, $ 1.00- 
$1.25. The definite price wiD be given later. 
•JJ Any one desiring to subscribe can do so by 
mailing an order to :: :: j* a 



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Manhattan, 
Kansas 



ALL ORDERS MUST BE IN BY MAY 10 



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THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



337 



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^The Kansas City — 

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Course Thorough, Practical, Complete 



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THE STUDENTS' RtiKALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




We hare a Dice line of goods 
suitable for graduation and 
class-day dresses, which we 
will be pleased to show you. 

French lawn. 50 inches wide, 
50 cents a yard 

French lawn. 48 inches wide, 
35 cents a yard 

Persian lawns, 90c, 25c. and 
35c per yard . 

Silk mulls in all colors and 
white, 50 cents a yard. 

Printed silk mulls, beautiful 
patterns. 50 cents a yard. 

White Habutai Silk. 75 cents a 
yard. 

White China silk. S7 Inches 
wide, 50 cents a yard. 



Never before have we shown so 

complete a line of Ladies' Shirt- 
waists and Shirt-waist suits. 
These come in a great variety of 
styles and materials including 
Mulls. Swiss, Allovers, India 
Linens. Linens and Kismit, also 
in colors in Madras and Percales. 

New goods arriving daily. 

You can not but be pleased with 

our line of Spring Jackets and 

Walking Skirts. 

S. H. & M. Guaranteed Taffeta 
Silk Petticoats in black and 
colors from $5.75 to $10.00. 

Ladies' and Children's muslin 
underwear at popular prices. 

McCall patterns. 10 cents and 
15 cents, none higher. 



Ladies' gymnasium slippers. $1 
and $1.35. 

Krippendorff-Ditfcmann's Shoes 
for Ladies in Kid. Patent Colt, 
and Vici, latest shapes. $2.35 to 
$4.00. 

Men's Box Calf. Valour, Pat- 
ent Colt, and Vici. from $2 up. 

Full line of Men's Furnishing 
goods, such as Hose, Collars. 
Ties. Shirts, Gloves, Suspenders, 
etc. 

EVERYTHING IN HARD- 
WARE. 

BEST GROCERIES A T 

LOWEST PRICES. 
Murdock's Coffees, 
O. P. T. Extracts. 
Manhattan Baking Powder. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



CALL AT 



The LEADER 



Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Kirksville.Mo.. 
and late of the Treating Staff of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
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A ND BUY YOUR 

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THEY HAVE ONE OF 
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Prices Always Right 



OFFICE: Union National 

Bank Bldg., Rooms 15-30. 



PHONE: Office. 134-2 
Res.. 134-3 



PROFESSIONAL. 



DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 

34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

1100111 16 - Union National Bank Building 




Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., March 22, 1906. 



Number 26 



Athletic Notes. 

The Faculty -College basket-ball game played 
last Wednesday evening resulted in a victory 
for the College team, the score being 41 to 29. 
The College team had things its own way in the 
first half, but the Faculty team took a brace in 
the last half and seoFed 21 points. 

Season tickets for the new grand stand at 
Athletic Park were placed on sale this week. 
The price is one dollar, and the ticket entitles 
the holder to a reserved seat at all baseball 
games for the coming season. Three hundred 
tickets will be sold, two hundred of which will 
go to students and one hundred to down -town 
supporters. 

The College basket-ball team played two 
games last week on their trip and lost both. 
The first game was played Thursday night at 
Emporia with K. S. N. The final score was 
23 to 20. This result was a surprise to the 
students here as every one expected the College 
boys to win without much trouble. The game 
with Washburn, played at Topeka on Friday 
evening, resulted in a victory for the Topeka 
team by a score of 25 to 18. According to all 
reports, this game was one of the roughest 
that our boys ever engaged in. The State 
Jmtrnal hinted that the Washburn team used 
prize-ring tactics during a part of the game. 
The men who made the trip are Coach Melick, 
Captain Ferris, Carr, Cain, Blake, Topping 
and Ny strom. 

44 46-89-97-106, throw that ball, freshmen" 
was one of the many laughable remarks heard 
at the basket-ball game, last Wednesday eve- 
ning. The freshmen, after a season's practice, 
decided that they would like to participate in a 
real game, so they persuaded a few innocent, 
unsuspecting sophomores to doff their coats and 
neckties and join them in a few minutes of play. 
The game was rough and tumble, interesting 



and laughable. It was full of excitement from 
the start to the finish. Brilliant team work by 
the freshmen and sensational individual play- 
ing by the sophomores characterized the entire 
game. The two guards, the center and the two 
forwards did the best work for the '08' s, while 
their opponents starred for the freshmen. 
When time was called the score was a tie so the 
game continued for about ten minutes. The 
final score was 17 to 15. 



Webster Feast, 

The society met at the hall in good season 
and at once proceeded to the business of the 
evening. Whether the prospect of the oyster 
stews made us more attentive to business or 
not we cannot guess, but it certainly was a 
wonder the rate at which we disposed of trials, 
amendments and the other business. We ad- 
journed as soon as we could to meet at the 
"Hotel deCoop." 

When we reached the "hotel," we fell in line 
without further preliminaries and were soon 
deeply engrossed in the stowing away of that 
anti-finny tribe of sea-monsters called oysters. 
If Daniel Webster could have seen his name- 
sakes at that moment he would no doubt have 
thought that we were using our jaws in a very 
unliterary way. 

After the first course we stopped to breathe 
for a few minutes and then listened to a short 
program. E. R. Kupper and Coxen gave us 
the old and revised version of "Casey at the 
Bat," respectively. Smith and Englehart 
then, moved by the spirit of the occasion, gave 
us a song of the oyster which had served in 
twenty -seven stews. Reed followed next with 
a history of the subject of our enjoyment and 
showed that oysters had claim to a very ancient 
origin. The debate on the question: " He- 
solved, That oysters furnish a better means of 
internal entertainment than pie, " was the next 



P, 



340 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



thinf? and was quite well handled. New and 
startling things were brought to light in regard 
to pie and oysters, but the oysters had by this 
time won a warm place in the hearts of the 
hearers so were awarded first place. To 
further convince ourselves of our judgment we 
again fell to eating, stopping now and then to 
listen to some special high-class jokes by 
various members. Sol. also gave us the 
latest history of the "pikers." 

Chocolates and fudge were the last things 
served which seemed to quiet, in a measure, 
the inner tumult. After listening to speeches 
by Gripton, Larmor, and Gilkison, we ' ' Wah- 
Hawed" homeward, sorry for the oysters hut 
exceedingly well pleased with our feast. 

Alpha Beta Sleigh /fide. 

Last Thursday evening about forty Alpha 
Beta boys and girls met at the southeast 
corner of the campus and took possession of 
two large sleighs that were waiting for them. 
After solving the problem of placing three 
people in places where there was room for two, 
only, they proceeded to follow Horace Greeley's 
advice and go west. Ray Birch, not being 
used to following the straight and narrow 
path, "dumped" his load in a ditch beside the 
road. After some difficulty everybody escaped, 
but after that the reins were placed in charge 
of one who was used to driving horses and not 
milch cows. 

During the remainder of the drive, which 
lasted about an hour, nothing more serious 
happened than several people falling out and 
Murphy getting somebody's foot in his mouth. 
As the foot (and part of the shoe) was re- 
covered, no one seemed to care. The expedi- 
tion finally stopped at the home of Josie 
Walter, where an hour or so was spent in 
playing games and disposing of pop-corn. 
The only notable events of the home going 
were the finding of Winnie Smith's hat and the 
appearance of Frank Harris in a parental role 
on Fremont street. G 



The Eurodelphian Spread. 

The Eurodelphians thought it a good plan to 
prepare for finals with a feast, and conse- 
quently each girl was told to bring something 
good to eat to society. So at a warning, given 
by beating on a dish pan, the girls flocked into 
the hall each bringing with her a fine appetite 
as well as something with which to satisfy this 
unusual hunger. 

Soon all were seated around the platform in 
a circle, and the eating commenced. Sand- 
wiches, salads, pickles, etc., were all devoured 
In the quickest manner possible, every one 




helping themselves. After this came fruit and 
candy and last, but not least, either in quality 
or quantity, came cake and orange ice, which 
we ate in true picnic fashion. 

After this we held a short business session 
in order that no one might leave and thus 
escape their share of cleaning up the hall, 
which was certainly in need of cleaning. 

Ag. Association. 
A goodly audience greeted President Snod- 
grass as he called the house to order. Hall 
led in devotion. H. L. Cudney and O. M. 
Kizer were initiated. The program was opened 
by music furnished by Miss Martin. J. L. 
Pelham gave a synopsis of Orison Sweet Mar- 
den's best book. This was followed by a 
paper by A. R. Luaff. R. J. Meenen read an 
essay on farm fertilizers. W. A. Connor ap- 
peared as editor of the "Rural ist." Vice-presi- 
dent Hall was called to the chair and M. D. 
Snodgrass showed us the advantages and dis- 
advantages of the various agricultural courses 
as given by the several colleges. P. H. Jor- 
genson then told us how farming was done in 
Denmark. Our critic then saw fit to compliment 
us on our proceedings as a whole. After 
transacting the necessary business, we ad- 
journed. a. J. Reed. 

lonians. 

As the critic said, our society began exactly 
on time, 2:45 p. m. In accordance with the day, 
our program consisted of Irish selections. 
Ruth Neiman told us the "History of St. Pat- 
rick's Day" and Minnie Conner gave some 
Irish jokes. Kate Hutchinson was editor of the 
"Oracle," The pantomine by Reva Cree and 
the clarinet duet by Mr. Roberts and Mr. 
Grabendike were both excellent. Other musical 
numbers were: vocal solos by Katherine Ward 
and Mr. Evans and an instrumental solo by 
Marie Coons. In a Harold gave a select read- 
ing. The novelty number, by Verda Murphy 
and Edna Brenner, was an Irish dialogue. 
Helen Halm was initiated into our society. 
After nominating the officers for spring term 
and transacting other business, we adjourned. 

E. B. 

A Complimentary Number. 

Through careful management, the lecture- 
course committee has been able to add another 
number to this year's course. The Lulu Tyler 
Gates Company will appear in the Auditorium, 
Friday evening, March 23. The company con- 
sists of Mrs. Lulu Tyler Gates, one of the most 
popular readers of to-day; Walter Bentley 
Ball, baritone: Ebba Hjertstedt, the Swedish 
violinist; and Grace Gilmore, pianist. Every 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



341 



member of the company is an artist. Coming 
when it does, immediately after examination, 
will make the entertainment an excellent place 
to forget troubles. 

The Hamiltons, 

The Hamilton hall was rapidly filling up 
when President Weaver rapped for order at 
7:30 last Saturday evening. We were led in de- 
votion by Schafer and then listened to the last, 
but not the least, program for this term. The 
music for the evening was furnished by Elsas 
and Davis, Elsas being assisted by Coles and 
Davis by White. The productions of both 
were immensely enjoyed by the society. Orren- 
dorf gave us a recitation in his usual charac- 
teristic manner, after which Praegor told us 
about the trip to Nashville. The only genuine 
slave auction sale ever held in the State of 
Kansas was given by Mr. J. H. Cheney. The 
prices were good, and we are authorized by Mr. 
Orrendorf, the owner, to say that he was more 
than pleased with the treatment received, al- 
though Mr. Hazen ended the ceremony rather 

abruptly. 

Ramsey criticised, and we were excused for 
ten minutes. After a stormy business session, 
we adjourned. C - G * N * 

Senior Girls Win Trophy. 

The last set of games in the girls' basket-ball 
tournment was played last Monday afternoon. 
The seniors played the sophomores for the 
College championship, while the juniors bat- 
tled with the freshmen for last place. Both 
games were interesting and fairly well played. 
More enthusiasm was shown than an any pre- 
vious game and there was also more ungentle- 
manly conduct than has been shown before. It 
seems strange that some fellows, when given 
the privilege of seeing such contests, should let 
their class spirit carry them so far as to use 
personal remarks to the supporters and players 
of another side. Unless some of the young men 
learn better manners before they become sen- 
iors, juniors or even sophomores, they will re- 
flect very little credit on their class. 

The first to be played was the junior-fresh- 
men game. The freshmen won the contest with 
very little trouble, although the juniors showed 
some excellent individual playing at times. 
The final score was : Freshmen, 25 ; juniors 10. 
The championship game was played last. 
Each of the teams had won two games and 
were especially anxious to win the last. 
Neither team seemed to be as strong on team 
work as in the preceding games, but all the 
players did well in individual work. The 
score at the end of the first half was 7 to 4 in 



favor of the Ws. The final score was 14 to 8. 
Those who have played on the various teams 
during the tournament are : 

Seniors— Sperry, Lyman, Hughes, Pittman, 
Hanson and Murphy. Juniors— Cole, Cave, 
Fry, Fleming, Cunningham and McDonald. 
Sophomores— Hawkins, Hassebroek, Tolin, 
Bardshear, Graham and Larson. Freshmen — 
Cree, Selby, Lueszler, Turner and Sutcliff. 



Little drops of nickels, 
In the slot machine, 

Makes the owner fatter 
And the dropper lean; 



Topeka Conference Meeting. 

The Kansas College Athletic Conference, 
commonly known as the Topeka Conference, 
held its annual meeting last Saturday. New 
officers were elected for the ensuing year, and 
a number of important changes were made in 
the rules. 

The most important change was in regard to 
summer baseball. The rules formerly read; 
14 No student shall participate in any inter- 
collegiate contest who has ever used or is using 
his knowledge of athletic skill for gain." 
Now the rules say that any person who plays 
in more than two games of summer baseball 
shall not he allowed to play on a College 
team. Each player will have to make a sworn 
statement of his eligibility, and this will be 
sent to the secretary, who will investigate all 
charges made against players. 

Another change made was in regard to the 
class work required of a player. At least 
twelve hours work must be carried by a person 
playing on any team. At least eight hours of 
this work must be recitation work. No matter 
what amount of work is carried by a player, 
he shall be declared ineligible unless he carries 
all of it satisfactorily. 

Action was also taken on the freshmen rule, 
in case of small colleges. From now on, all 
schools having an enrollment of less than four 
hundred students will be allowed to play fresh- 
men. 

The following officers were elected: Presi- 
dent, Pres. E. R. Nichols, K. S. A. C; vice- 
president, Professor Woods, Washburn ; secre- 
tary and treasurer, Professor Wilbur, K. S. N. 

The discovery of an ocean desert, a vast sub- 
marine Sahara, destitute of every vestage of 
plant or animal life, and covering millions of 
square miles of the bed .of the Pacific, is the as- 
tonishing news brought back by Professor Al- 
exander Agassiz, recently returned from a six- 
months' cruise in the Government deep-sea 
sounding- boat, Albatross. 



342 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 







M»tf«: LctCvehy 
One CuirivATt Hit 

'Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-offlce at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, live cents. 



F. A. Kiene. Jr.,*06 Editor-in-chief 

GroverKahl.W Business Manager 

E, C. Fakhah. w Uterary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08.... Local Editor 

S. W. Cunninoham, *0W Exchange Editor 

C. E. Whipple. W Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. 'OT Subscription Manager 

Grace Hawkins. '08 ! . T , „.. t 

A. G. Phillips, W f Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Swket. '04 Alumni Editor 

Jas. R. Coxen. '08. Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are*most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet, 'ot, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Mar. 22, 1906. 




The baseball and grand-stand tickets will be 
on sale during- the time which ensues before 
the first game, April 4, and it is hoped that 
enough of each will l>e sold to insure large 
crowds and success to the grand-stand venture. 
Prospects are very bright for a pennant-win- 
ning team at K. S. A. C, and every hoy and 
girl who deliberately chooses to remain away 
from the games will miss an opportunity to 
enjoy outdoor entertainment such as seldom 
comes to students. 



Although the present incumbent should re- 
main in office during the two succeeding issues, 
baseball and class-book work call for his best 
efforts during the immediate future, and he has 
persuaded the succeeding editor to relieve him 
with this issue. We bespeak for him in his ef- 
forts during the coming year the heartiest sup- 
port and the deepest sympathy. His time will 
be taken up with College work to an extent 
that will make outside interests, even at the 



best, a serious drain upon his energy. If the 
Herald is to prosper it must at least be liber- 
ally supported in subscriptions by the students 
of the College. There is much room for im- 
provement with a minimum of energy to make 
the same. 

In conclusion we wish to refer to our work of 
the past year. We are painfully aware of its 
insufficiencies and would like nothing better, if 
it were possible, to go over the ground again 
retouching and recasting here and there. Our 
relations have been both pleasant and profit- 
able, and it is with some degree of reluctance 
that we lay down our pen. During our time in 
office we have sought only the best interests of 
every College movement and organization and 
have cared nothing for self emulation or ad- 
vancement. We are grateful for the oppor- 
tunity of working with so potent a factor as the 
College paper for the best good of the greatest 
number, and if our efforts have in any way re- 
sulted in making more prosperous and success- 
ful any student venture, we are well repaid. 
We wish to thank our associates on the staff 
for their hearty support and earnest work and 
to beg again for those who labor on, the best 
that their constituents can give. To those who 
have followed the paper's every movement with 
interest and solicitation we are deeply grateful, 
and hope that this patronage will continue. In 
the future we shall look to see the Students' 
Herald standing at the top of the list of all 
college publications and the students bound to- 
gether in support of it and thus reverting the 
same to every College movement of interest and 
importance. 



"The very flowers that bend and meet 
In sweetening others arrow more sweet " 

— O, W, Holm?*, 

The lucky man is the man who sees and 
grasps his opportunity. 

George Tharp, of the engineering class of 
'80, University of Wisconsin, has been made 
president of the Illinois Steel Company at a 
salary of 150,000 a year. Recently, he was at 
the head of the Clairmount Steel Company at 
a salary of $18,000 a year. Up to the occur- 
rence of the world's fair, he worked in overalls 
at a salary of $15.00 a week.— Ex, 

People who accomplish but little usually 
have a genius for seeing difficulties in the way 
of everything they undertake. Their imagina- 
tions conjure up obstacles which rise in their 
pathway and paralyze their courage. They can 
see them a long way off. They begin to look 
for them as soon as they decide upon any 
course of action; they wait for them, and of 
course, they find them.— Ex, 



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Students' Herald 



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• 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



343 



Exchange. 

"A laugh is worth a hundred groans in any 
market,"— Ex. 

"Be praised not for your ancestors, hut for 
your virtues." 

Truth is the summit of being; justice is the 
application of it to affairs.— Emerson. 

Few are open to conviction, but the majority 
of men are open to persuasion,— GoetJie. 

No nation can be destroyed while it 
possesses a good home life. — /. Q. Holland. 

There are times when the truest courage is 
shown in retreating from a temptation.— Ex, 

Cast your bread upon the waters, but do not 
wait until it is too stale for your own use,— Ex. 
' 'Tis a question left us yet to prove, whether 
love leads fortune or fortune love." 

— Shakespeare. 
Know your own value, but take care to let 
no one else discover that you know it.— Ches- 
terfield. 

"A man who dares to waste an hour of time 
has not learned the value of Ufa.**— Charles 
Jhirwin. 

"This is the best day the world has ever 
seen. To-morrow will be better."— R. A. 
Campbell. 

"This is a grave mistake," sobbed the [man, 
when he found he had been weeping over the 
wrong tombstone.— Col u mbia Jester. 

It is rumored that the military department of 
the university of Nebraska, at the request of 
the cadets, is considering the organization of a 
company of zouaves. 

Happiness comes not from the power of pos- 
session, but from the power of appreciation. 
Above most other things it is wise to cultivate 
the power of appreciation. 

I'm proof against the word "failure." I've 
seen behind it. The only failure a man ought 
to fear is failure in cleaving to the purpose he 
sees to be best.— George Eliot. 

The management of the University of Ne- 
braska summer session for the coming summer 
has joined with the other universities and col- 
leges of the state in a union summer session to 
be held in Lincoln. —Ex. 

Walter C. Booth, who has coached the Ne- 
braska football team for the past six seasons, 
and who has made a splendid record for him- 
self as a constructive coach, has announced 
that he will not return next fall, assigning as a 
reason for his decision his intention to devote 
himself exclusively to the practice of law in 
New York City, where he is a member of a firm 
with excellent prospects.— jEe. 



K. S. A. C. Directory. 



HAMILTON SOCIETY 

President C.I. Weaver 

Vice-president C. K. Davis 

Secretary R E - Brown 

Meets Saturday evening, at 7:30 o'clock, in North Soci- 
ety Hall. 

WEBSTER SOCIETY 

President C. B. Kirk 

Vice-president W. A. Conner 

Secretary H. H. Con we 1 

Meets Saturday evening, at 7:30 o'clock, in South Soci- 
ety Hall. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY 

President Ju»a V. Wendel 

Vice-president E. W. Matherly 

Secretary Jessie Allen 

Meets in South Society Hull. Saturday. 2:00 P. M. 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY 

President Richard Reece 

Vice-president L. R. Elder 

Secretary ■ ■ - - Clara Schield 

Meets in Franklin Hall. Saturday, at 7::W P. m. 

EURODELPHIAN SOCIETY 

President Bollne Hanson 

Vice-president Tillle Harold 

Secretary Fannie Johnson 

Meets every Saturday in Franklin Hall, at 3:45 p. m. 

IONIAN SOCIETY 

President Laura Lyman 

Vice-president Odessa Dow 

Secretarv Edith Forsy the 

Meets in North Society Hall, Saturday, at 2:45 v. M. 

Y W C. A. 

President ....',..*.... .■.., .... Cora E. McNutt 

Vice-president Helen Inskeep 

Secretary Ethel Berry 

General Secretary Miss Thayer 

Weekly meeting during noon hour each Saturday in 
South Society Hall. The Home. 817 Munhattan Ave. 

Y. M. C. A. 

President ■• ■ E. C. Farrar 

Vice-president - . W. B. Thurston 

Secretary E. L. Shattuck 

General Secretary w - w - McLean 

Sunday afternoon meetings in Association parlors, at 

3"30 

ROOTERS' CLUB 

Chairman F\ A. Kiene. Jr 

Vice-chairman A. D. Hollo way 

Secretary «£A&£?2 

Treasurer Fred Lindsey 

Meets at the call of the chairman. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President E. C . Adums 

Vice-president A. D. Hollo way 

Secretary -,0. E. Whipple 

General Manager Prof. G. A. Dean 

Meets at call of the president. 

ENGINEERS' ASSOCIATION. 

President ■;T J )e .T Car . ls0, J 

Vice-President R- N. New hind 

Secretary *>*« Dow 

Meets Saturday evenings in C60. 

GIRLS' ROOTERS' CLUB. 

President Stella Camnhell 

Secretary Neva Larson 

Leader Laura Lyman 



The tabulated results of the Corn Judging 
Contest are as follows: Classes— First, soph- 
omores ; second, seniors ; third, short course ; 
fourth, juniors. The members of the winning 
team are Gernert, Cron, H. L. Cudney, Peter- 
son and Cooley. In the individual contest the 
students ranked as follows: Gernert, '08, Will- 
iams, '07, Cron, '08, Overfleld, s. c, Lambert, 
'07, Greenough, '06, Creighton, s. c, Walter, 
'07, and Copeland, '07. 



344 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



. 




Scholz went to church a few weeks ago, 

Kahl says that he will cut out ererytftinq next 
fall. 

R. H. Shaw returned to Lincoln, Neb., Mon- 
day. 

New Signet hat pins and waist sets at As- 
kren's, the jeweler. 

Fred Williams visited in Wakefield for a 
few days last week. 

Fine watch and jewelry repairing at Askren's. 
All work guaranteed. 

We counted at least one original local in the 
Industrialist this week. 

Professor Ten Kyck went to Clay Center last 
week on institute work. 

The short-course farmers had a group picture 
taken one day last week. 

Miss Bessie Montgomery, former student, 
visited around College last week. 

Hear Lulu Tyler Gates, reader, at the Col- 
lege Auditorium, Friday evening. 

Victor Oman is again aide to be about 
school, after two weeks' sickness. 

The sophomores and the Irish appeared in 
their respective colors last Sa turd a v. 

Miss Delia Matteson was called home last 
week on account of the illness of her father. 

One hundred volumes of bound magazines 
have arrived at the Library during the last 
week. 

Forget your troubles by attending the com- 
plimentary lecture-course number, Friday 
evening. J 

The erasers in Assistant Potter's class room 
had a case of "here we are and here we aint " 
last Friday. 

Miss-lTnice Gates entertained several of her 
friends at her home on Moro street, last Satur- 
day evening. 

D. C, Sullivan was called to his home near 
Ulysses, last week, on account of the sickness 
of home folks. 

Carlson and Dow have commenced work on 
:ieir thesr 
Generator 



their theses Their subject is ""'Gas" Engine 
r Tests." 



According to the Industrialist, E. J. Evans is 
deeply interested in a cottage that is to be built 
on Houston street. 

Quality is our aim. We handle the best 
quality of jewelry that money can buv. 
Askren, the jeweler. J 



The College dairy herd will be tested by Dr. 
Barnes and Assistant Melick, this week*, for 
tuberculosis. 

On account of unavoidable interferences, the 
K. U. Glee Club will not. appear in Manhattan 
as previously announced. 

Hazel Gilbert, '08, has dropped out of Col- 
lege. Her parents moved from Manhattan to 
K am on a, Kan., and she accompanied them. 

"Professor" Topping, assisted by McLean, 
Booth, Melick, and Ahearn, composed the 
Faculty team at the recent basket-ball game. 

The Chemistry Department is analyzing some 
canned vegetables for the State Board of 
Health. They are looking for adulterations. 

Charles Jones will take up the study of book- 
keeping next term. It isn't any advanced 
bookkeeping, either. It is just the plain old 
"prep." kind. 

A letter arrived at the College post-office not 
long ago addressed to "The Sporting Editor 
of the Industrialist," and it was turned over to 
Professor Willard. 

Have you purchased a grand-stand season 
ticket yet? If you haven't you'll have to 
hurry, for there are only two hundred that will 
be sold to students. 

All the boys who hibernate at the "Hub" are 
wearing hurnsides. Microscopes will be fur- 
nished by the Botanical Department to those 
who care to see the said hurnsides. 

The Herald appears one dav late again this 
week on account of the rush" of work in the 
Printing Department. The usual number of 
'eussin's" will no doubt be received. 

Rev. W. C. Hanson, who has been pastor of 
the Methodist church for the past two yearS, 
has been appointed presiding elder of the (lav 
Center district. Rev. S. A. Bright will be the 
pastor here. 

|JmK ifit'l^S? other *** r dipped and 
fell, but before falling I rose four feet into the 

feet M When l hlt the ground I bounced two 
Werner-" Did you light on your head?" 

H. E. Tannehil, who left school early in the 
term on account of sickness, attended the Glee 
Club concert held in Wakefield last week. He 

StS r , ft S ds Wlth a11 the b0 * s and seemed glad 
to see College mates once more. 

W^^fT*' "£**" Brown and Chaunoev 
Weaver stole quietly into the " Hotel de Coop/' 
last Saturday night and ate up the fragments 

Hamn^n ° f the Webster P feast Ev?n a 
Hamp. will show good judgment sometimes. 

Mid?inH ¥ **? th l boardePS of the Akin and 

InSahnJ ^wSK >T SeS marched over *> the 

leSo^S^ h °V Se ^ ith tbe i^ention of 

iwu\ /n° aid hoarders in a snow-ball fight. 

theTcfnt wrth ra a P ,w * In * raba ? appeared™ 
made to Z S* a ft?* ^ n r hich ' in time > w as 
™kkV g ° off Wlth a loud report. As fried 

ftTJ ° n *? t aMe fop dinner Ihe next 
place mU8t have taken effect *o™ 




ssm 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



345 



i 



NEW CLOTHING 



NEW SHOES } 
NEW HATS 



NEW GOODS arriving daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. 



* * • * 



• ■ ■ • 



Meet our 



ttr JOHN COONS, of Course 



Walk-Over 
Shoes 



J 



Fine watch and jewelry repairing" at Askren's. 
All work guaranteed. 

Ross Kgy and R. A. Page will start out 
grafting for a view company next week. 

Posters have been distributed announcing a 
concert in Glasco by the Queer Quartet. 

The College won first prize on the quality of 
milk entered in the certified milk contest held 
in Chicago, recently. 

"Professor" Topping and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Stauffer both took part in the Faculty- 
College basket-ball game. 

Always a beautiful line of diamonds, 
watches, jewelry, silverware and hand-painted 
china at Askren's, the jeweler, 

Rennie Greene goes to the Hays Experiment 
Station this coming Saturday to take charge 
of the Horticultural Department. 

Henry VanLeeuwen, the great cheese special- 
ist, took charge of the dairy laboratory classes 
last week during the absence of Assistant Me- 
lick. 

The Euro's, had a "spread" last Saturday 
afternoon. Brock, Lawson and Connor were 
given the privilege of "cleaning up" what was 
left. 

In a very poorly played game of basket-ball 
Tuesday evening the College team was defeated 
by Ottawa, 35 to 2H. The freshmen won from 
the juniors by a score of 25 to 16 and thus won 
the class championship. 



Five of the electrical engineers were chosen 
by the Bullock Electrical Co. represent ive, 
who was here last week, for positions after 
graduation. 

Last Saturday Jim Garver took the College 
Glee Club to the candy kitchen and set them all 
up to refreshments. All the members now say, 
"What's the matter with Jimmy V" 

My feelintrs are nearly dtstranfrht 
For sleep all in vain I have sought 

But why I so fear 

Now final is here 
Is because every day I got 0. — a. &. 

While falling over the side of a sleigh one 
night recently, Frank Harris tore his trousers 
in a very embarrassing place. He was careful 
to keep sitting down or up against a wall for 
the rest of the evening. 

During the recent basket-ball trip each mem- 
ber of the team received a oickname from his 
team mates. Nystrom was called the "Star 
Boarder" and received an extra dish at every 
hotel where the boys stayed. Can* was called 
"Swellhead:" Ferris, "Baby:" Cain. "Irish:" 
Blake, "Blue Tie:" and Topping, "Alkali 
Ike." 

Misses Beryl Rickman and Ethel Justin en- 
tertained about twenty members of the '05 class 
of the Manhattan high school at the home of 
Superintendent Rickman last Monday evening, 
in honor of Miss Grace Hanson. The rooms were 
decorated in pink and brown. The evening was 
pleasantly spent in playing games. Refresh- 
ments of ice-cream, cake and punch were served 
by the hostesses. 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 5S££££ 



Text-Books 
all Kinds 



Keutt'el & Esser Line- of Drawing Material 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

University Perfection Separate-Leaf Note-Books 

We also have many Second-hand Text-Books at much less price 



Prices Guaranteed a» low aa the lowest 



311 Poyntz Avenue 



346 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 









£ : ~ . - i ^r ~ ?*^* , » 



a sggsga s s sa a s a 



* ■ ,|» *M ^ ■ !■■ ! ,<< M ^ J 



COLLEGE CAMPUS RESTAURANT 



Ice-Cream Sodas, Sundaes, Coco-Cola, etc., Ice- J 
Cream, Confectionary, Short Order and Lunches 



GARVER & BARRETT, 



Proprietors 



S5SS=A> —*■=; 



Alumni and Former Students. 



J. G. Chitty asks to have his Herald sent to 
Bitfelow, near which city he is running a farm. 

Klva Akin, '05, asks to have her address 
changed from Kmporia, where she has heen at- 
tending Normal, to Zeandale. 

E. A. Logan, '05, visited College a few days 
last week. At present lie is in the hardware 
business in Havensville, Kan. 

Mrs. Mabel (Groome) Gawthrop, senior last 
year, came up from her home in Williamsburg 
last Friday for a visit with relatives in Man- 
hattan. 

Wayne White, '05, who is engaged in survey- 
ing work near San Marcial, N. Mex., writes 
that the climatic conditions there are of the ex- 
treme order and that he recently saw a bull- 
fight in Old Mexico where more blood was 
spilled in twenty minutes than in all of K. S. 
A. C'i football career. 



Among the "schoolmarms" who will be back 
and enter College next week are: Walter Zahn- 
ley, Ella Hathaway, Margaret James and Ma- 
bel Howell. 

Professor Webster, chief of Dairy Division 
of IT. S., has sent in a request to Professor Erf 
for some men to work in his department. 
These men must be graduates and must take a 
civil service examination. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. X X 

W. M, STINGLEY & CO. 

00 TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of ciirars and toilet 
articles, Razors boned. 

BARNEY Y0UNQCAMP, Prop. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS Si. 00 
302 Poyntz p, C HOSTRUP, Prop. 



BOYS! 



GO TO 



FOR 

Oysters 
IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and . 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs tine line cigars and toilet articles 




THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



847 



Is the place to buy all your College Supplies for the spring 1 term. By experi- 
ence this has been confirmed. We handle both new and second-hand books. Also 
drawing sets, drawing paper, stationery, note-books, pencils, and Fountain Pens, 
etc., etc. Hours: 7 to 8:30 a. m. and 12 m. to 6:15 p. m. 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo. T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 113,15 N. Second St. 

Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to .College Clubs. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NGS 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

M ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



Orr 



a * • • 



• STUDIO is the place to get 

*3 PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 

The Pantatorium 



Get your clothes cleaned and pressed 
Call and see our prices. 



1218 
Moro St. 



R. W. Oakes, Prop. 



SENIORS 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photon 
graphs made- You 
feel better, so do we. 



Wolfs Studio 



MH 




848 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



P 



I 



7! 



<( 



THE OLD RELIABLE" 



.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



i 



i 



We make all our own 

. . Candies . . 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies 



* * mm 




All Kinds of 



Ice C 



ream 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Fi* Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
OUniain. ICE CREAM SODAS 



i_- 



I 



I 



J 



Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



q 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. % If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
% Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. 1$ Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

lttt Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 anil 1] Druniru Street. 



General Offices: 
r4 Cortland t Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

24B MeDermet Avenue 



How the 



joMiiai 



Fills Itself 



Just a quick, simple pressure of the thumb and Conklin's Self- 
filling Pen is completely filled. A collapsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel of the pen compresses, and when released, instantly draws in 
the ink through the feed channels at the point, filling the Conklin 
Pen ready to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. Dis- 
penses entirely with the old-fashioned drop-filler method. So simple 
that you can't go wrong — you can't get your fingers inky, or entail 
any loss of time. The lock-ring shown in the lower left hand cor- 
ner prevents the ink from being forced out after reservoir has been 
filled, either when pen is in use or in the pocket. 

The ORIGINAL and ONLY GENUINE 

Conklin's Self-Filling Pen 

is a marvel that has completely revolutionized fountain 
pen construction. Its surprising simplicity combined with 
utmost care in manufacture, makes it practically proof to 
trouble of any sort. Responds at the first touch to the 
paper— flows evenly and regularly until the last drop of 
ink is exhausted. Ink capacity as large as old style 
fountain pens, yet it never overflows when in use. 
Presser-bar prevents pen from rolling off a sloping surface, 
and is so arranged as not to be in the way when writing. 
Feed channels are thoroughly cleaned in the same easy way 
as filling. All Conklin Pens are unconditionally guaran- 
teed to fulfill all claims we make. 
If your dealer does notjiandle the Conklin Pen, let us 
make you our Special Offer to fountain Ten Users. 
Full information, with illustrated catalog, 
sent upon request. 

Sold by Dealers Every when. 



\ 



THE CONKLIN PEN CO. 

S14, 516, 518 JetfersonAve^ Toledo, Ohio. 

TheE.A.WUlteImiCo..93ReadeSL,NewYork. 

DdieO inn*. 1C53 Cortli St, Denver. 

Cardlnell-Vbicent Co„ 414 Market St., 

San Mm 

American Afeneka. Ltd, 38 Shoe Lane, 

Fleet SL, London, E. C. inf. 

lit, Mum A Gilbert, «7 Market 9L. 

Melbourne, Anat 






viK-^^^^V.^.^^.^^^^^-*^^-^^^^^^^^^.^^^-^^^^^-^-^.^-^.^.^.^.^.^^. j 





a 



2x 



Students* Corduroy Trousers 
Yale Pattern, The Very 



Latest. 



-V 



Price, $4.00 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x x 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. AT X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



%««««««««iaai«««i»aaiia»aii»nn»a^ 



* 

* 
* 
* 
* 

I 
I 

* 
* 



The Big Racket 



% 

* 

I 



Stationery, Pencils, Note-books, 
Tablets, Pens and Ink, Photo 
S upplies, Room Furnishings 

Don't buy your Spring Embroideries and Laces until you 
see our Unequalled Line. Everything in Laces from a 5-cent 
Valenciennes to the Genuine Linen Torchon. Big Values in 
Embroideries, 5 and 10 cents, and upwards, also Skirt and 
Corset-cover Embroidery greatly underpriced. 



1 



****w**w***^^^ 



<Am 



ft 



%\xz Students' Herald 



\ 



Published by the Student* 
of the Kama* State Agri» 
cultural College X X 





\ - 



TPPIPWPPP 



■ 






' ' 




THICK CREAM 



e i ," " 



11 i r>ah»^ 



!l * ■«'*-*■' 



■**• 



«■ M 



at 



SELLS FOR ONE CENT MORE 
PER POUND THAN THIN CREAM 

f] The creameries of the country hare become bo con- 
«U vinced of the increased value of thick cream over thin 
" cream that many of them are paying one cent per pound 
more for cream tostlmg 30 per cent and over than for that 
testing under 30 per cent. The reasons for this are: 

FIRST.— Thick cream makes better butter because It contains lass 
milk and therefore keeps In better condition. SECOND.— Thick or earn 
la so much less In quantity- that the oost of transportation la less, 

It is much better for the dairyman to make' thick cream, because he has more 
skimmed milk left at home to feed the calves. It then follows that dairymen should 
buy only such separators as can separate thick cream. 

\ 

The U. S. Separators Lead the World in this Particular 

Beware of the oheap and poorly constructed Separators that cannot make thick cream. 
They would be expensive even If furnished without oost. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., Bellows Falls, Vermont. 

Eighteen centrally located distributing warehouses throughout the United States and Canada. 



if 



-it 



A Matter of Economy 

to boy your 

Peed f Seeds & Puel 

from 

Hie Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, flgr. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



STUDENTS, 

OCT YOUR 



WOOD 



of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 



PHONE 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 

7— *. TH4MD *T. 



: 



«** 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line, 
Meet all trains day or night, 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for class 
parties, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: :: :: :; :: :: 



. 



H. J. Barnhouse 



PHONE 65 



L W. PMIUpt 




*"^ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



349 



Is the place to buy all your College Supplies for the spring 1 term. By experi- 
ence this has been confirmed. We handle both new and second-hand books. Also 
drawing sets, drawing paper, stationery, note-books, pencils, and Fountain Pens, 
etc., etc. Hours: 7 to 8:30 a. m. and 12 m. to 6:15 p. m. 






SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 



Elevator on C R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



3J 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

Kl NG'S 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Walt for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 

GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

42 ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



Orr 



« * • • 



f STUDIO is the place to get 

^ PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 

The Pantatorium 



Get your clothes cleaned and pressed 
Call and see our prices. 



1213 
Moro St. 



R. W. Oakes, Prop. 



Portraits 

COLLEGE 

VIEWS 

Wolfs 

STUDIO 

Opposite City Library 






350 



THE STUDEJSTS' HEKALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




OOODS 

Suitable for graduating and 
class -day dresses, which we 
will he pleased to show you. 

French lawn, 50 inches wide, 
50 cents a yard 

French lawn, 48 inches wide. 
35 cents a yard 

Persian lawns, 20c, 25c. and 
35c per yard. 

Silk mulls in all colors and 
white. 50 cents a yard. 

Printed silk mulls, beautiful 
patterns. 50 cents a yard. 

White Habutai Silk. 75 cents a 
yard. 

White China silk, 27 Inches 
wide, 50 cents a yard. 



JUST RECEIVED 

A full line of SPRING CAPS in 
many different styles and ma- 
terials. Just the thing for col- 
lege wear. Call and see them. 
We know you will be pleased. 
We are showing the best line of 
wash petticoats ever shown in 
this city. They are made of the 
best quality of gingham in very 
neat and attractive designs, 
ranging in prices from 60 cents 
to $1.75. It will also pay you to 
examine our line of black mer- 
cerized petticoats. We nave a 
dozen different styles ranging in 
prices from 98 cents to $3.50. 

S. H. & M. Guaranteed Taffeta 
Silk Petticoats in black and 
colors from S5.75 to $10.00. 

Ladies' and Children's muslin 
underwear at popular prices. 



Ladies' Gymnasium slippers, 
$1.00 and $1.35. 

McCall patterns, 10 cents and 
15 cents, none higher. 

Krippendorff-Dlttmann's Shoes 
for Ladies in Kid, Patent Colt, 
and Vicl. latest shapes. 12.25 to 
$4.00. 

Men's Furnishing 

Goods, such as Hose. Collars. 
Ties, Shirts. Gloves, Suspenders, 
etc. 

EVERYTHING IN HARD- 
WARE. 

BEST GROCERIES A T 
LOWEST PRICES. 

Murdock's Coffees. 

O. P. T. Extracts. 

Manhattan Baking Powder. 

Money back if not pleased. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladles' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Keady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



CALL AT 



The LEADER 



A ND BUY YOUR 

0XF0RD5 

THEY HAVE ONE OP 
THE LARGEST STOCK 
OP SHOES IN MANHAT- 
TAN, AND SELL FOR 
CASH, THEREFORE 



Prices Always Right 



Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

05TE0PATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Kirksville.Mo., 
and late of the Treating Staff of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free of charge. :: :: :: :: jj :; 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office, 134-2 

Bank Bldg.. Rooms 15-20. Res.. 134-3 



PROFESSION A L. 



DB. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 

34 years of continuous practice should he convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Gave. 

Office in Union NatL 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room 16. Union National Bank Building 



• 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc Students Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural Collegc 

Motto:LiecEveryODeC7altivat:eHi3 OmaQenias. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., March 29, 1906. 



Number 27 



Athletic Notes. 

The following men played in six or more 
basket-ball games and will receive the official 
monogram in recognition of their services: 
Ferris, Carr, Cane, Blake and Topping. Nys- 
trom and Haynes both did exceptionally fine 
work, but neither played in enough games to 
win a monogram. 

The athletic board of the State University 
made a rather queer ruling last week in regard 
to the eligibility of Captain Johnson, of the 
baseball team. He was enrolled in the art 
course, but because of a deficiency in his stud- 
ies he was unable to play ball. He then de- 
cided to change to the law course and the ath- 
letic board decided that since his deficiencies 
were made in another course, he would be al- 
lowed to play. This seems to be a rather hard 
blow at "pure athletics." 

The basket-ball game with Ottawa University 
ended the season here. This is the first year 
that the College has ever been represented by a 
basket-ball team. We feel rather proud of the 
record they have made, for they have won five 
out of ten games. Still, for two reasons we 
are very glad that the season is over. The 
first of the reasons is the fact that a number of 
our students have not yet learned to take de- 
feat like gentlemen. The young man who offi- 
ciated for Ottawa at the last game was one of 
the best officials who has been here this year. 
He was a little slow and made a few question- 
able decisions, but he tried to do the square 
thing, yet some fellows were so ungentlemanly 
as to hiss him several times. The other reason 
is that our team has arrived at that stage of 
their career where their supply, of self-confi- 
dence is too large. The absence of Haynes and 
the poor condition of Ferris lost the games for 
the boys on the trip, but nothing but a case of 
over-confidence lost the Ottawa game. We 
don't want to knock on the work of our team, 



for their fault — over-confidence — is one that 
has characterized so many of our athletic teams 
in the past, yet we believe that a nine-months' 
rest will put them in better shape for the games ■ 
of next year. 

Less than one week until the first ball game, 
and yet very few students know anything about 
the prospects of our team. The bad weather 
has prevented practice for almost four weeks, 
so the team has not yet been picked. We have 
talked a good deal, both to Coach Ahearn and 
Captain Cunningham, and both seem confident 
of a fine team. A good many of last-year's 
team are back to play their old positions, but 
the team will also contain a number of new 
men. The infield will be fast and each man 
will be a hitter. Captain "Sol" will take care 
of his old place at short. Mallon, when not in 
the box, will cover third, B. Cave will do the 
same at second, while Putnam or "Shorty" 
Haynes will play first. In the box will be 
found Mallon, Furey and Coldwell of last- 
year's team. A number of new men, among 
whom are Hayes, Topping, and Shelton, are 
also trying for this place. Carl Miller is with 
us again, and will do the catching. Jorgenson 
and Myers have each been showing up in very 
good shape. In the outfield Herb Strong will 
have his old place in left, but no one has been 
selected for the other places. Davis and Porter 
are both playing a good game this year, but 
Al. Strong and Compton will push them hard 
for a place. We have three fine men for 
captain, manager and coach, and there is little 
doubt but that we will be able to turn out a 
dandy team. The lack of practice may make 
the men a little slow for the first week or two, 
but if we will just be a little patient the team 
will improve and we'll all feel mighty proud of 
them. 

The track team will commence practice at the 
city park as soon as the weather permits . Some 




352 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



of the prospective candidates for the pole vault 
and high jump are Watkins, Oskins, Ferris 
and Stauffer; for the sprints are Edelblute, 
Carr, Brock, Thurston, Cain, Shulerand Bull; 
for hurdles, Lawson, Anderson, Cunningham 
and W. Thurston ; for weights, Putnam, Whipple, 
Oslund andFarrar;fordistance running, Bealey, 
Peairs, Milligan, Stauffer, Hastings and Purdy; 
for broad jump, Watkins and Brown. Several 
track meets have been arranged for by the man- 
ager, and it is up to the students to get out and 
try for positions on the team. A preliminary 
meet between the classes will beheld and every- 
body can at least try for the class teams. We 
are the best College in Kansas in more ways 
than one, so why not hold the same place in 
track athletics. 

A Knock on Baker, 

The following is a clipping from the Daily 
' Nebraskan and is part of a write-up of a basket- 
ball trip of the N. U. team last month : 

"The best of treatment was accorded the 
fellows at every place except Baker University, 
and as the spirit of true sportsmanship has not 
invaded the little Kansas town yet, the boys 
were not surprised. It is no wonder Kansas 
has experienced trouble with the Methodist 
school, for they do not know how to take 
defeat, even when it is administered in a 
gentlemanly fashion. " 

This is a polite way of saying what the people 
who have dealt with Baker in the last few years 
have said in stronger terms. There would be 
some excuse for a large private school to use 
the Baker tactics, but for a school representing 
the largest denomination in Kansas it is a 
disgrace to the church it represents, to the 
State and to the university itself. 

It is a laudable ambition to excel, but when 
the motto is, "Win by any means." the honor 
of winning is a minus quantity. In almost 
every case where Baker meets other schools 
there is dissatisfaction. We have it from a 
good authority that without doubt Baker will 
have at least five professional players on their 
team this spring. They are: Blackburn, 
Mason, Bloom, Jones and Lewis, who played 
on the Hutchinson team of the Central Kansas 
League in the summer of 1905. These, with the 
help of a student umpire, will win all games 
played on Baker grounds. No doubt the 
majority of Baker students want a square deal, 
but the number of roughnecks, bums and 
hoodlums who are allowed to act as such at 
home and abroad bring discredit upon their 
team and school. 

The remedy we suggest is that Baker be 
stricken from all schedules in the State if they 



do not show a better spirit this spring. A few 
years of this would probably bring about a 
better spirit and cleaner athletics at Baker 
University. L. E. G. 

The Lain Tyler Oaten Co, 

Although the weather was very unfavorable, 
a well-filled house greeted Mrs. Lulu Tyler 
Gates and her excellent company of artists last 
Friday evening. Those who did not attend, 
thinking that because this was a complimentary 
number it would probably not be up to the 
standard, failed to hear one of the very best 
numbers of this season's course. 

In the opening number Miss Ebba Hjertstedt 
proved that she was a violinist of the highest 
order. Each of her numbers on the program 
was encored heartily, and she responded with 
the most beautiful selections. Charles Bently 
Ball has a strong, smooth voice and he uses it 
well. Miss Grace Gilmore appeared but once 
as soloist but her number was excellent, the 
people demanding an encore. As an accom- 
panist, Miss Gilmore did her part well, sup- 
porting the soloists in such a way that one 
scarcely thought of anything but the solo. 

But the best part of the program by far was 
the part of the reader. Her first number won 
the whole audience. She was encored again 
and again, responding with such varied and 
well-rendered selections that the whole audi- 
ence was moved to laughter or to tears at her 
will. Her negro dialect selections were espe- 
cially realistic. We will not soon forget her 
imitation of the negro mammy putting her 
little coon to sleep, nor her impersonation of 
"black Mary." We venture to say that Mrs. 
Gates is the best reader that we have ever 
heard at this College. 

As a whole we could not ask for a better en- 
tertainment of this kind than that given by this 
excellent company. We would be glad of an 
opportunity of hearing them again. 



Choral Union Banquet. 

Last Monday evening the Choral Union gave 
an informal banquet in the Woman's Gymna- 
sium. The organizations represented were the 
Choral Union, Band, Orchestra and Glee Club. 
Over a hundred were present. The first part of 
the evening was spent in playing games and 
getting acquainted. While sandwiches and 
ice-cream were being served President Ntchols 
was called upon for a toast. He responded 
with words of praise for the musical organiza- 
tions of the College. After supper the time 
was spent in singing some of the old songs 
that we. have worked on so hard and long. 
Professor Valley was asked to sing and this he 



i'-JlMM... BJI 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



353 



did, rendering two most beautiful solos. Pro- 
fessor Kammeyer's toast, together with Pro- 
fessor Valley's wit, made another enjoyable 
number on the extemporaneous program. After 
Miss Edna Jones had played two beautiful 
piano solos, the party slowly dispersed, feeling 
that the Choral Union can entertain in a social 
way as well as in the musical. 

One of Them. 



Sophomore Skating Party. 

Last Monday evening the sophomores de- 
cided to celebrate the end of the winter term by 
having a class party at the skating rink. 
About sixty were present and enjoyed the 
skating. As none of the girls and a very few 
of the boys had ever seen roller skates before, 
some laughable falls and tumbles occurred. 
However, no one was hurt and soon all were 
skating more or less gracefully. About ten 
o'clock the girls served refreshments consist- 
ing of blackberry and orange Bavarian ice, 
'08 cake and punch. After skating for awhile 
longer some one discovered that it was quiting 
time, and the hats etc. were not "hunted for in 
the dark" as usual. Every one present says 
that it was the best class party they ever at- 
tended. 

Kindness. 

Kindness is the essence which gives life its 
pleasant flavor. It is not made up of great 
deeds, but of little daily acts, such as pleasant 
smiles, cheerful words and little kindly deeds. 
There is nothing easier to give and perhaps 
nothing that will lighten the sad and drooping 
heart of some one more. Nothing gives greater 
pleasure to the giver and receiver of some 
kindness, for the receiver is made happy by it 
and it is a great satisfaction to the giver to 
know that by him some one has been made 
happier. Kindness is best Bhown in our homes 
in our thoughtfulness of mother, father, brother 
or sister, for no one in this world loves us as 
they do and no one is more affected by our 
kindly acts than they are. It is by our cheer- 
ful words and helpful deeds that we show our 
love for our friends. If we wish to be known 
by our kind deeds and not by what is written 
on the marble slabs at our heads after we have 
been laid to rest, we must make ourselves liv- 
ing monuments in the sight of God and our 
friends, remembering that kindness is the oil 
by which the wheels of life are made to run 
more smoothly. — Alpha Beta Gleaner. 




People seldom improve when they have no 
other model but themselves to copy after.— 
Goldsmith. 



By turns we catch the vital breath and die.-— 
Pope. 

How long we live, not years, but actions, 
Us\\.— Waikins. 

To err is human, but to laugh when your fel- 
low students err is more so. 

Dost thou love life? Then do not squander 
time, for that is the stuff life is made of.— Ben 
Franklin, 

K. S. A. C. is to have several fossils. 
Whether for the Faculty or for the museum is 
not stated. 

If President Roosevelt succeeds in eliminat- 
ing brutality from football, he might then take 
up the college yell. — Ex. 

The old saying, "What you don't know won't 
hurt you," does not hold good when we are 
taking an examination. — Ex. 

No one can be perfectly free till all are free; 
no one can be perfectly moral till all are 
moral; no one can be perfectly happy till all 
are happy.— Spencer. 

Stanford University has adopted a speeial 
insignia for her athletes who have served their 
alma mater in athletics four years. Besides 
the "S," the fortunate one is allowed to wear 
four stars on his sweater.— Ex. 

The council of Illinois University have pro- 
hibited- the presence of bulldogs upon the cam- 
pus of the university and requested students 
not to keep such animal I themselves in or 
about their boarding or rooming places. 

One of the largest works of man's hands is 
the artificial lake or reservoir in India, at 
Raj pu tan a. This reservoir, said to be the 
largest in the world, known as the Great Tank 
of Dhebar, and used for irrigating purposes, 
covers an area of twenty-one square miles.— 
Ex. 

A battle-ship like the Connecticut, which rep- 
resents the latest type, costs seven million five 
hundred thousand dollars. This ship weighs 
sixteen thousand tons and carries a main bat- 
tery of twenty-four guns. Its speed will be 
eighteen knots per hour. It requires Ave years 
to build such a ship, and its period of useful- 
ness will not be over fifteen years. It costs 
fifteen hundred dollars a day to keep such a 
vessel in commission. War costs. 



354 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




NlD 



Motto: LrTtvEflr 
Onc Cuirnwrt Hi* 

Printed in College Printing Departs 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 

C. E. Whipple. '07 .Editor-in-chief 

Groveh Kahl. '07 Business Manager 

May Griffino. '07 Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08 Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham. '08 Exchange Editor 

H. R. Hillman. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. E. Brock. '08 Subscription Manager 

Grace Hawkins, *08 J. a<ISO( , T^eai Editors 

A. G. Phillips, w f Assoc ' uocal Mltors 

Elizabbth Sweet, '04.... Alumni Editor 

Jas. B. Coxen. '08 Reporter 

All orders Tor subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Mar. 29, 1906. 




The reserved seats in the grand stand seem 
to come a little high, but there will be at least 
fifteen games here this season and it will prob- 
ably be arranged so the tickets will be good 
for next baseball season also. 



Now is a good time to prepare for next final. 
During this term a great many demands will be 
made on the students' time — baseball games, 
track meets and social functions. Every one 
has plenty of time if only utilized to the best 
advantage. Be thorough and keep busy. 



Following the example of some of our best 
exchanges, we have decided to invite each of 
the classes to take charge of the Herald for 
an issue during this term. Each class will be 
expected to elect a staff and practically all the 
paper will be devoted to the interests of the 
class in that issue. We hope this matter will 
be taken up immediately, as prompt work is 
needed to make this a success this term. 




The other day at the Library, in looking 
over some magazines, it was noticed that a 
great many ragged holes exist in place of the 
beautiful half-tones that should be there. Per- 
haps the vandal thought it "smart" to so 
mutilate the periodicals. Perhaps he didn't 
think. Whoever has those pictures decorating 
his room, may they be a monument reproach- 
ing him for a most contemptible deed. 



In another column will be found a knock on 
Baker which may seem out of place for us, but 
we stand for pure athletics and we can be proud 
of our teams which have represented K. S. A. C. 
and are willing to have the records of our foot- 
ball players investigated. And as every school 
is having a dig at Baker, we feel it our duty to 
express our disapproval of her tactics as ex- 
perienced in some of our past contests with her. 



This issue marks a new administration in the 
affairs of the Herald for better or for worse. 
Our platform is to do as our predecessors; 
m., our best. Our politics will be that of the 
students. We hope to be liberal enough in our 
views to live and let live. We hope to let 
truth dominate these pages and to condemn 
any deception wherever practiced. We declare 
for a square deal to students and Faculty. To 
bear criticism and be cheerful will be a char- 
acteristic. If you have an idea that hurts you, 
let us hear from you. We wish to echo the 
appeal of the outgoing editor to the students 
for your support, as the success of the Herald 
depends on it. Mistakes will occur and possi- 
bly you may see an improvement in some line. 
If you do, say so. As we look forward to the 
possibilities in this position it is with regret 
that so many will not be grasped. We wish to 
thank you for the privilege of wielding the big 
stick in the Herald sanctum, for it is indeed 
an honor. So much for the present, may the 
future reveal itself. 



Pointed Paragraphs. 

Go slow and get left. 

Insist on yourself; never imitate. 

Sincerity is the backbone of success. 

Where there's a will there's a feast for law- 
yers. 

Music from above must lead the marching 
here below. 

It is a wise son who knows when to ask his 
father for money. 

Reference books contain everything but the 
one thing you want to know. 

"The moment a man is satisfied with himself 
everybody else is dissatisfied with him." 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



355 




Baseballs— all makes. Frost & Davis. 

Sol. Cunning-ham helped rustle locals this 
week. 

Get our prices on Tennis Rackets. Frost & 
Davis. 

Arthur Kiene spent the holidays visiting in 
Topeka. 

Don't forget. First game of the season next 
Monday. 

A new churn has been installed in the dairy 
building. 

Professor Dickens is back after a two-weeks' 
institute trip. 

Maroon jerseys have been ordered for the 
baseball team. 

A good room to rent at 917 Osage street. 
Electric lights. 

R. M. Moody was showing his father about 
College last week. 

Jesse George was "under the weather" Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 

Horace Bixby has purchased a new double- 
barreled euphonium. 

The janitor force oiled floors and mended 
seats during the holidays. 

Fine watch and jewelry repairing at Ask- 
ren's. All work guaranteed. 

The late spring has caused a great rush of 
work in the Farm Department. 

"Mike" says that the cinerarias in the green- 
house are making a fine display. 

Professor McEckron, dean of art school at 

Washburn, visited College last Saturday. 

Quality is our aim. We handle the best qual- 
ity of jewelry that money can buy. Askren, 
the jeweler. 

Professor McKeever addressed the Geary 
County Teachers' Association in Junction City 
on March 17. 

Savage and Sheldon, two prospective pitch- 
ers, have left school and will not be back for 
the spring term. 

Dan Walters "killed" algebra IV last term 
and "Legs" Thurston treated object drawing 
in the same way. 

Charlotte Morton, Maud Harris, James 
Coxen and C. E. Foster visited out of town 
during the vacation. 

Miss Lillie Berg and Miss Anna Edwards en- 
tertained" six classmates last Friday evening in 
honor of Miss Lyda Berg. 



Mrs. Barlow, who has been visiting her 
daughter, Gertrude Barnes, returned to her 
home in Blue Rapids, Monday. 

V. E. Hess, junior last year, visited in town 
over Sunday. He is now employed in the 
Electrical Department on the Gulf Division of 
the Santa Fe. 

Professor Kinzer has gone to Howard, Kan,, 
where he hopes to purchase some steers for 
show purposes. He will go from there to 
Council Grove. 

The College Library received five hundred 
volumes from the State bindery during the 
winter term. Four new dictionaries were also 
added to the reference shelves. 

Regent E. T. Fairchild, who is superintend- 
ent of the Ellsworth city schools, is after the 
nomination for State Superintendent and seems 
to be in a fair way to land it. 

Some of the gi*oup pictures that have been 
taken lately are the Hainiltons, Ionians, do- 
mestic science short-course girls, short-course 
farmers and the '(Mi football team. 

Mr. Osburn. who has been staying with his 
son the last eighteen weeks at the hospital, 
spent last week at his home in Chautauqua 
county looking after spring work. 

Charles Weeks, junior here in '04, visited his 
sister, Ella Weeks, on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day. He was on his way to Boston where he is 
employed as an electrical engineer. 

Chas. Hughes, formerly private secretary to 
President Nichols, who left here last spring to 
take up the study of law in Kansas City, has 
passed the examination and been admitted to 
the bar. 

Mm. Sarah Bernhardt will appear in Topeka. 
April 7. If sufficient numl>er from Manhattan 
will go, very low rates and a special return 
train will be provided. The U. P. agent should 
be notified by those desiring to go. 

The "Happy Family," otherwise, known as 
the delegates who went to Nashville, had their 
pictures taken Monday afternoon. From the 
gallery they adjourned to the skating rink 
where they spent the rest of the afternoon. 

From a freshman's examination paper: "The 
length of the sentence depends entirely on what 
you are writing about and what the purpose of 
it is. If for the public, it should be simple; if 
for the '(Mi engineers, it may be a little more 
complex." 

A number of the veterinary boys celebrated 
the arrival of their "Vet" hats by going down 
to the skating rink, last Saturday evening, and 
engaging in a series of gymnastic stunts. Herb. 
Groome secured the greatest number of downs. 
Cassel tried for goal, but usually missed. 

Congress, on March 12, passed a bill increas- 
ing the appropriation for the experiment station 
from $15,000 to $30,000 per year. The appro- 
priation this year will be increased $5<M)0, and 
$2000 additional each year thereafter for five 
years. This is a good thing for the station, as 
it will enable those in charge to do some things 
that they have not been able to do on account 
of lack of funds. , 




■■■ 



^w 



■HHHViB 



356 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Edelblute is back in school. 

Victor Baseball Goods. Frost & Davis. 

D. H. Gripton left for his home Monday 
night. 

Furnished rooms entirely modern, 803 Moro 

street. 

Hobart Oskin's parents have moved to Man- 
hattan. 

The Board of Regents will meet in regular 
session. 

Charles Willard is enjoying a case of mumps 
these da vs. 

Captain Shaffer visited out of town Saturday 
and Sunday. 

W. W. McLean is busy ''making up" back 
post-office work. 

Regents Fairchild and McDowell were visit- 
ing College !ast week. 

E. C. Farrar will lead the Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ing Thursday evening. 

Professor Willard was away two days last 
week on institute work. 

Tennis Goods. Prices are what you want. 
See us. Frost & Davis. 

Prof. O. Erf left last Saturday for Topeka 
where he spent a few days. 

Assistant Jackson went to Chicago Saturday. 
He returned Tuesday evening. 

Miss Anna Monroe, '04, is back in College 
this term taking special work. 

The Ionians are preparing a special program 
to be given next Monday evening. 

Mr. W. W. Stan field came up from Topeka, 
Saturday, for a visit with friends. 

Mr. Raymond Harrison spent his vacation 
between terms visiting with Centralia friends. 

A number of students have been "exposed" 
and expect to have the spring fever in a short 
time. 

Union services were held in the Congrega- 
tional and Methodist churches last Sunday eve- 
ning. 

Miss Stella Ballard was called to her home 
in Washington county, Thursday, by the death 
of her brother. 

Baseball teams should call and see what we 
can do for them on complete or part outfits. 
Frost & Davis. 

A special train will be provided Sunday, 
April 8, for those desiring to attend the "Mes- 
siah" at Lindsborg. 

A merry party of young folks spent Satu rday 
evening at the home of Miss Virginia Trout- 
man on Moro street. 

Always a beautiful line of diamonds, watches, 
jewelry, -silverware and hand-painted china at 
Askren's, the jeweler. 

Among the short-course students who will 
remain and take regular work are Misses Pearl 
Sanderson, Wilma Evans and Cora Hepworth. 



"Mike's" team r*. the First Team Friday 
night, at the Commercial Club hall. The re- 
ceipts will be used for the benefit of the Court 
House clock. 

The Rooters' Club met after chapel one 
morning last week and elected their officers for 
the following year. They are: A. D. Hollo- 
way, chairman; J. R. Coxen, vice-chairman; 
J. E. Brock, treasurer: B. H. Wilber, secre- 
tary. 

Professor Valley announces that the Musi- 
cal Department will commence giving monthly 
recitals, beginning the first of next month. 
These recitals will consist of piano, vocal and 
instrumental solos of about twelve numbers. 
They will begin at 8 p. m., and everybody is 
invited to attend. 

Two members of the freshmen class, with 
names corresponding to the class colors, at- 
tended a party last Saturday night. Part of 
the evening's entertainment consisted in ob- 
taining partners by guessing hands protruding 
through a curtain. These two people quickly 
matched up. Wonder why? 

The Y. M. C. A. elected the following officers 
last Thursday evening: President, A. D. Hol- 
lo way; first vice-president, C. E. Whipple; 
second vice-president, J. K. Brock; secretary, 
R. W. Hull: board of trustees — E. C. Farrar, 
A, D. Holloway, J. R. Garver, Professors Ten- 
Eyck, Eyer and Hamilton, S. J. Pratt, C. Ew- 
ing and Dr. G. A. Crise. 

Last Wednesday, Kedzie Hall was given over 
to an exhibit by the domestic science short- 
course girls, whose term has just ended. The 
second floor was devoted to products of the 
needle, while down-stairs samples of *'good 
things to eat" were much in evidence. From 
two to four in the afternoon about two hundred 
guests, mostly club women from down town, 
were entertained. 

Contrary to all expectations the basket-ball 

season did not close as successfully as was 

expected. Following is the financial report : 

Expenses ( visiting teams > $180 75 

Coach s salary 50 

Miscellaneous ( team's expenses, hull rent. etc.. )., . IHtt 84 

Total expenses $420 r>9 

Total receipts of season , gjjg j j 

Deficit for hasket-ball season $29 63 

The following is the revised baseball sched- 
ule: Games on home field— St. Paul Associa- 
tion League, April 2; University of Nebraska, 
April 11; Washburn, April 14; College of 
Emporia, April 17; Ottawa University, April 
27: Baker University, May 1; Kansas State 
Normal, May 5; Fairmount College, May 10; 
University of Kansas, May 21; Friends Uni- 
versity, May 26: Haskell Indians, June 4. 
Games away from home— Haskell Indians, 
April 23: Baker University, April 24; Kansas 
University April 25; Kansas State Normal, 
May 7; Washburn, May 8. Season tickets are 
on sale at $1.50 including all games but the 
St. Paul Association. A rebate of twenty-five 
cents will be given to members of the Athletic 
Association or Rooters' Club. A member of 
one of the organizations may obtain a rebate 
on one ticket, and a member of both may 
obtain a rebate on two tickets. 




™ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



357 



Alumni and Former Students. 

Rlva Akin, '05, was about College, Saturday. 

John Patten, '95, accompanied by Sadie 
Suingley Haggman, '96, visited around College 
last week. 

Gussie McCormick, formerly of the '07 class, 
has just closed a successful season's teaching 
near Zeandale and was visiting College friends, 
last week. 

Another letter from the far west tells us that 
there are several K. S. A. C. girls near Los 
Angeles, Cal. Francis Fish, '05, is at home 
at Carpenteria, Cal., and Mary Col liver, "05, 
is in Los Angeles. 

O. B. Whipple, '04, writes that he had a nar- 
row escape in the recent wreck in Colorado. 
He was returning from a farmers' institute and 
was in a sleeper on one of the wrecked trains, 
but was fortunate enough to escaps with only a 
few bruises. 

til a Dow, '05, writes from Framingham, 
Mass., where she is attending the Framingham 
Normal School of Domestic Science, that she 
is enjoying life to its fullest extent in the vicin- 
ity of such a city as Boston. She is very much 
interested in the' graduate work she is doing in 
chemistry. 

A letter from Mary Hall, '04, from 934 West 
Seventh street, Los Angeles, Cal., tells us that 
she is working in the linen room of a hospital 
there. She says there is a peculiar fascination 
about the hospital work and since she enjoys 
all the privileges of the nurses, including their 
lectures, she enjoys the work and is learning a 
great deal. She savs, "The weather here now is 
fine, with a rain or two a week. The hills are 
green and the wild flowers are blooming so it is 
really spring." 

All alumni and former students of K. S. A. 
C. in Chicago and vicinity should take note of 
the following: The second annual banquet of 
the Chicago K. S. A. C. alumni will be held at 
the Saratoga Hotel, April 21, 'OH. Any alum- 
nus or former student in Chicago or vicinity 
who does not receive an invitation will confer a 
favor on the association by addressing the 
president, D. G. Robertson, at 153 La Salle 
street, or the secretary at 4143 Indiana Ave. 
Signed, W. F. La wry, gee. 



Odds and Ends. 



If you stub your toe twice on the same nail, 
do not blame the nail. 

Beauty without grace is the hook without the 
bait. Beauty without expression tires.— Emer- 
son, 

The improvement of the mind improves the 
heart and corrects the understanding.— Aga- 
tfton. 

True, the world loves a quiet man, but it 
gives a lot of attention to the fellow who gets 
up and howls. 

Look up. not down; look forward, and not 
back; lookout, and not in; and lend a hand. 
— E. E. Hale. 



The other day a wagon maker, who had been 
dumb for years, picked up a hub and spoke. 

A girl is one of the members of the debating 
team which Ohio State University will send 
against Illinois this year. 

We contend that no man can eat a genuine 
old-fashioned, back-on- the-f arm pumpkin pie 
without being the better for it. 

The large flag that the "Oregon" flew at the 
battle with the Spaniards at Santiago has 
been presented to the University of Oregon. 

Read not to contradict or confute, not to be- 
lieve and take for granted, nor to find talk and 
discourse, but to weigh and consider. — -Bacon. 

A student's paradise is life without a flunk. 

Don't be afraid of criticism. Accept it at 
face value. If it is just, improve on it; if not, 
see how you can use it. 

A bill has been introduced in the Virginia 
assembly to prohibit the game of football in 
Virginia. A penalty of from fifty to one hun- 
dred dollars is prescribed for each offense. 

The University of Heidelburg has recently 
secured a new building for its library which 
contains more than 700, 000 volumns. Some 
twenty miles of shelf space is required to hold 
the books. 

Sororities have fallen under the ban at 
Drake. A short time ago a sorority was se- 
cretly organized, but the secret reached the 
ears of the president and he informed the mem- 
bers of the new organization that they could 
not belong to the university and the sorority 
at the same time. 

College wrestling is fast gaining a foothold 
in the East. The University of Pennsylvania 
held thp first successful intercollegiate cham- 
pionship meet last year, which was won easily 
by Yale, the pioneer in college wrestling. This 
winter Cornell has taken the sport up heartily, 
and hereafter will contest for honors in that 
line. 

H. E. Huntington is preparing to establish a 
permanent Indian exhibition in Southern Cali- 
fornia. It will have a group of every tribe of 
Indians in North America permanently quar- 
tered there, hesides an art gallery containing 
Indian photographs. The Indians will live in 
their native dress, and will engage in various 
handicrafts. 

One of the best things that we ever heard of 
Henry Clay is that when he was stumping his 
state for reelection, at a mass meeting that he 
was addressing he found an old hunter of wide 
political influence, with his rifle on his shoulder, 
who said to Mr. Clay, "Well, Harry, I have 
always gone for you, but since you have voted 
in the, way the hunter mentioned, I have con- 
cluded to go again you." Mr. Clay, turning 
to the old hunter, asked to look at his ritte and 
then said to the hunter, "She a good rifle, isn't 
she?" "Yes." "And you have always thought 
a good deal of her, haven't you?" "Yes." "Did 
she ever miss fire?" The old hunter admitted 
she had. "Well then why didn't you throw 
her away?" The old hunter thought a minute 
and then said, "Well Harry, I'll go for you 
again." 




858 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



i 

! 



NEW CLOTHING 



NEW SHOES \ 

NEW HATS 



NEW GOODS arriving daily in every department- 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: :: :: :: :: 



Meet our 

Tailor 



JOHN COONS, of Course 



Walk/Over 

Shoes 






THE 



HERALD 

WILL GIVE 



Spicy and Complete "write-ups" of 
all the baseball games this coming 
spring:. If you want to keep up on 

ft 

athletic events It will pay you to 
subscribe. DO IT NOWI 



• t ■■ 



$1 PER YEAR 



si.v^ci 



SCC 



^ ^ " g i f~- n y^ 




THE GOOD 

Clothes 

STORE 



SEE OUR NEW 

Rain Coats 
Top Coats 
Suits 

Shirts and 
Hats 

The man who does 
not know what he wants 
for his Spring Suit can 

put in a very pleasant 
b. Kuppp- hef^cr & Co naif-hour in finding it 



Chicago 



at 



E, L Knostman's 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE SSSTJ^Sr 

K«*iitf el & Esser Line of Drawing Material 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

University Perfection Separate- Leaf Vote- Books 

We also have many Second-baud Text-Books atniucb lesH nrln« 

Spalding's Line of Baseball Goods P C 



Prices Guaranteed as low as the lowest 



31 1 Poyntz Avenue 




^ ' 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



359 



r 



i 



71 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

. . Candies . . 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 




All Kinds of 



Ice C 



ream 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 






■ | ji_t.ui Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink line. Finest 

r OUIlullIK ICE CREAM SODAS 



L- 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



« 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. 1& If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
•J Don't let your i /aste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest, fl Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drunim Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

131 Youville Square 

TORONTO 
and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 



I 



I 



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il 



360 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



I 









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COLLEGE CAMP US RESTAURANT 

Ice-Cream Sodas, Sundaes, Coco-Cola, etc., Ice- 
cream, Confectionary, Short Order and Lunches 



GARVER & BARRETT, 



Proprietors 



F«a 






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THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 



Go to 



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For Sheet Music, Pianos, Pictures, 
Wall-paper, and Paint 

West Room, Union National Bank Building 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best, X 3£ 

W, M, STINGLEY & CO, 



ao to 

Jl. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors boned. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



GO TO 



FOR 

Oysters 
IKE HOLBERTS 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz p, Q. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Buildintr. 

Porcelain bath tubs tine line clears and toilet articles 



New and 2^" 
School Books 



R. E. LOFINCK 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

iltnoni^ *i tv /l t? Vl ,-,.,■, *- Tk ft * _ T-r a m n -■... . 



Spectacles 
Gold Pens 



Ail vr • i t r l\,i * ««-* «■*▼»*««, rimtl CHINA 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Musir ITAT/R 1 pdtpi? r<~n o *. 

Sporting Goods 10 to 20 PER dgl MOT ^ON^ ia£B6'.""' N °" 0nS aDd 



Hov/ Cht 



Fills Itself 



\y 



TPWLYfr Vjx fyS^P t*. A colkpsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel M tht MdMMW, <hd when reGaed, instantly draws hi 
the iiUHfaKmgh the feed channels at the point, filling the Conkfin 
Pen rtsdy to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. D& 
peases entirely with the c*frn*Houed drop-ffller method. Soshnple 
tmft yon catft go wtong^y6<i ora*t g^yo«^nnge*iiiky,oTenttil 
any loss of time. Hie tack-rin* shown in the lower left hand cor- 
ner prevents the ink from befog] forced out after reservoir has been 
fflWtf *li* when pen is in us? or in thtfpacfiet* 



UluU 



flNLT 



!,ii till 



'. 






i&£fr_tt- 
xounrani 



trbubtei 



Its surprising simplicity combined with 

it practically proof to 



at the first 
rly until 



it 



drop of 
old style 



and 



channels 



If 



W 



you our' Si 



flat to be m the way when writing 
" " r cleaned in the same easy wi 
fns are unconditionally 

the Conklin Pen, let 



Full 



upon 
SMfy 



with illustrated catalog, 



if* jj * 



t..L C L LXW *- ttitt i. C C t- t tt t C L t, L C *- «, *- 



W. S. ELLIOT 



Students' Corduroy Trousers 
Yale Pattern, The Very 
Latest. -:- Price, $4.00 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING 

Our l«rge experience in haodlina Undent track d 



yean enables u» to meet their 

312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



lurnu many 
exactly. X X 

MANHATTAN, KAN. 



,****; 



>>>>->>> 



> > > > > 



Li 



**V V*i V»\ 



Lttti 



The Big Racket 



Stationery, Pencils, Note-books, 
Tablets, Pens and Ink, Photo 
Supplies, Room Furnishings 

Don't buy your Spring Embroideries and Laces until yon 
see our Unequalled Line. Everything in Laces" from a 5-cent 
Valenciennes to the Genuine linen Torchon. Big Values in 
Embroideries, 5 and 10 cents, and upwards, also Skirt and 
Corset-cover Embroidery greatly under pr iced . 



TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTrn^TTTT 



■*- :i 



«M^HBMM^H 



* 



TZf 






IChe Students' Herald 



Published by the Student* 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 



f 











m 



mmsm 







I 

I 



DAIRY SWEEPSTAKES 
OHIO 

Grand Sweepstakes 

Dairy Sweepstakes 
Creamery Sweepstakes 

at the Ohio State Dairymen's 
Convention held at Dayton, Jan- 
uary UrSA. Creamery score, 971; 
farm dairy. 97. 



WISCONSIN 
Grand Sweepstakes 

at the Wisconsin State Dairy- 
men's Convention at Waukesha, 
Jan. 30 to Feb, I. Score. 97f 




CREAMERY SWEEPSTAKES 



CONNECTICUT 
Grand Sweepstakes 

at the Connecticut State Dairy- 
men's Convention at Hartford. 
January 17-18. Score 90. 



MAINE 
Dairy Sweepstakes 

at the Maine State Dairymen's 
Convention at Plttsfleld, De- 
cember 6-7. Score 97|. 



* n J?A !M£ Stat ^ S«»?«*or JMda, WwM*» Record tor Closest Separation of cream, and above Is 
l« ^tZrtLl*lX! ^ °L J? *?*** Z Uc £ 8 £ ow that I 1 * »3 StateoSoparator Delivers the Cream 
in smoothest and Best Condition to make the finest quality of butter. Free Catalogue on application. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO, 



U 



' * Bellows Falls, Vt, 

K1«HT*KN DI«TMIBUTIN« WMIHOVtl* throughout TMK (INITIO • TATM AND CANADA 



I 



I 

I 



J 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



GOTO 



FOR 

Icecream and 

Icecream sodas 

IKE HOLBERT'S 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturer! of 

ll*g..*aft *«mm_Wm MlUWse Cultivators. Safety 
T«?_..e. y? est 55 8 ,* P tu « Wonder Churns. Perfection 
Lawn Swihgs. Oak Stoves. Sash Weights Chlrn¥eyCaM 

? ft frt 1 SS H0 ?. Tr0 ^ 118 :. Str V ctural «S wSri m sSve a S 



MANHATTAN, 



KANSAS 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line, 
Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for ball 
games, ete. Lot us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty, :: :: :: :: ;: ;; 



H. J. Barnhouse 



PHONE 65 



L W. Phillips 



\ 



■ ., . 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



THE 



Students' Co -operative Bookstore 

Is the place to buy all your College Supplies for the spring 1 term. By experi- 
ence this has been confirmed. We handle both new and second-hand books. Also 
drawing 1 sets, drawing- paper, stationery, note-books, pencils, and Fountain Pens, 
etc., etc. Hours: 7 to 8:30 a. m. and 12 m. to 6:15 p. m. 



SOCOOOCOCOSCOSCCOCCC^SOCCOC^XysOBOCOOOSO&C^VBOCOOOOOOOO^ 



bfcllUb GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. it P. Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 

AHingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



te 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KING'S 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Wait for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 

GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

±1 ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEADER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 

and HARD and SOFT COAL. 
Phone 55 Phone 55 



Orr 



j STUDIO is the place to get 

J) PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: :: 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 

The Pantatorium 



Get your clothes cleaned and pressed 
Call and see our prices. 



1218 

Moro St. 



R. W. Oakes, Prop. 



Portraits 

COLLEGE 

VIEWS 

Wolfs 

STUDIO 

Opposite Giy Library 




362 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



TT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




iM 



DEALE 



GOODS 

Suitable for graduating and 
class-day dresses, which we 
will be pleased to sbow you. 

French lawn, 50 Inches wide, 
....50 cents a yard 

French lawn, 48 inches wide. 
35 cents a yard 

Persian lawns. 30c. 25c. and 
35c per yard. 

Bilk mulls in all colors and 
white, 50 cents a yard. 

Printed silk mulls, beautiful 
patterns. 50 cents a yard. 

White Habutai Silk, 75 cents a 
yard. 

White China silk. 27 inches 
wide, 50 cents a yard. 



JUST RECEIVED 

A full line of SPRING CAPS in 
many different styles and ma- 
terials. Just the thing for col- 
letre wear. Call and see them. 
We know you will be pleased. 
We are showing the best line of 
wash petticoats ever shown in 
this city. They are made of the 
best quality of gingham in very 
neat and attractive designs, 
ranging in prices from 60 cents 
to $l .75. It will also pay you to 
examine our line of black mer- 
cerized petticoats. We have a 
dozen different styles ranging in 
prices from 96 cents to $3.50. 

S. H. & M. Guaranteed Taffeta 
Silk Petticoats in black and 
colors from |5.75 to Si 0.00. 

Ladies' and Children's muslin 
underwear at popular prices. 



Ladies' Gymnasium slippers. 
11.00 and 11.35, 

McCall patterns, 10 cents and 
15 cents, none higher. 

Krippendorff-Dittmann's Shoes 
for Ladies in Kid, Patent Colt, 
and Vici. latest shapes, $2.25 to 
$4.00. 

Men's Furnishing 

Goods, such as Hose, Collars, 
Ties, Shirts. Gloves, Suspenders, 
etc. 

EVERYTHING IN H A R f> 
WARE. 

BEST GROCERIES A T 
LOWEST PRICES. 

Murdock's Coffees. 

O. P. T. Extracts. 

Manhattan Baking Powder. 

Money back if not pleased. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry -Good a, Keady-to wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware, 






GET BUSY 




But don't work and worry yourself to 
death to find style and comfort in 
SHOES, but go direct to 

THE LEADER 

They carry a complete line of Dry-Goods and 
Furnishings at lowest cash price. 



Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Kirksville.Mo.. 
and late of the Treating Staff of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free of charge. :: ;; r •• :: » 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office, 134-2 

Bank Bldg.. Rooms 15-20. Rea„ 134-3 



PROFESSFOiVA L. 



DK. G. A. CItis IC, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. T AYLOIt, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union Natiopal Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone, Colt 30» Res. Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Omce phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormlek, Dentist 

""C" 1 lft Union National Bank Building 





Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc Students Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MotTUD:IietEveiyQDeGultivat6Hi3 CtonGento 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., April 5, 1906. 



Number 28 



A Lucky Accident 

CHAPTER I. 

High up on a mountain, surrounded and cov- 
ered with trees and undergrowth, is a cave. 
Its entrance is guarded by a huge boulder, and 
one might walk right over it without ever 
knowing it was there. 

This place was the home of a man whom we 
might have seen, if we had been there on a cer- 
tain day, sitting on the stump of an old tree 
gazing steadfastly into the little impetuous 
brook that gurgled happily down the moun- 
tain side. The steady gaze showed that his 
thoughts were not on the things immediately 
around him, while his face was that of a man 
who is living in the depths of despair. It was 
seamed with lines of suffering, though it was 
decidedly young. 

Suddenly the bark of a dog broke in on the 
perpetual stillness of the place. The man, 
startled, rose and, looking far down the moun- 
tain, saw coming up a party of people. How 
many he could not tell at that distance. He 
went quickly to the cave, and with hurried, ex- 
cited movements covered all traces of his exist- 
ence there; then with the dog disappeared 
within it. 
, ...••• .... 

"How soon will we make camp, John?" in- 
quired Greta, as tired and foot-sore the little 
party stopped to rest for a moment. 

"I don't know, Greta, but I will find out from 
the guide." 

"Isn't it perfectly lovely to be going some 
place that no one else whom we know has ever 
been?" asked Priseilla— Pris for short. 

"It may be fine and all that sort of thing," 
assented Edith, "but I am getting exceedingly 
tired." 

"Well, cheer up," said John, who had just 
returned. "Eli says we are to camp up there 
on that little knoll on the other side of the 



brook. So you see we haven't far to go. 
We will start as soon as Mr. and Mrs. Weldon 
and the boys catch up with us." 

Thus it was that this party of adventurous 
young people pitched their tents not twenty 
feet from the cave. They were not even aware 
of its existence, as the sole occupant only ven- 
tured out through a more remote entrance after 
nightfall. 

For several days all ran smoothly and every 
one had a good time in this quiet, beautiful 
spot, seemingly so far from the civilized world. 
One evening when the "family," as Mrs. 
Weldon called the little party, had gathered 
together for supper, Mrs. Weldon said, "I 
don't see Pris, Alice, where is sbe? In her 

tent?" 

"Why, no," replied Alice, "I haven't seen her 
this afternoon. Does any one know where she 

is?" 

"Early this morning," said Fred, "I saw her 
starting out for a walk and asked her if I might 
not go too, but she said no that intended to 
take a long ramble all by herself. So of course 
I stayed here, but I supposed that she was back 
long ago." 

At this disclosure every one started out on a 
tour of investigation, but by this time it was 
dark and they had only one lantern. They 
feared something serious had happened to Pris 
and ran wildly about accomplishing nothing, as 
they knew very little of the surrounding country. 

Unconsciously as the little company passed 
and repassed in groups of two or three a little 
chump of thickly clustered trees and under- 
growth, they told the story to an anxious and 
unknown listener, the young mam of the cave. 

"Soon," he thought, "there will be a moon, 
then I must find this girl. She is either lost or 
hurt, but in either case she needs the assistance 
that I can probably give her. I have not lived 
in this place a year in vain if I find her." 



364 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



So a couple of hours later when the moon 
rose in her full glory ne started out, keeping 
carefully in the path which he knew would he 
alluring to a girl. He had walked for miles 
when he heard distinctly: 

"is that you, John? I'm over here. I've 
hurt my foot and can't walk a step." "It 
isn't . " He stopped abruptly as he ap- 
proached nearer. 4, Pris!" he gasped. Then 
the moonlight fell full upon his face and for 
the first time she saw it. 

(To be continued I 



Athletic Notes. 

The double-header basket-ball game at Com- 
mercial Club Hall last Thursday evening "drew 
a very small audience. The first game 
was between the sophomores and freshmen. 
The freshmen had claimed the College 
championship, but this game settled their 
hopes, and now the sophomores have an undis- 
puted title. From now on they alone will have 
the right to call themselves "the champions." 
The features of this game were the line bucking 
of Kittell, the hurdling of Warren, and the 
politeness of Milligan. The final score was, 
sophomores fi, freshmen 5. The second game 
was between Abeam' s picked team and the 
College team. Ahearn's team won by a score 
of 39 to 34, Carr and Ferris felt unable to use 
their ability to help such an object as the 
court-house clock, so their places were ably 
filled by Haynes and Topping. 

Charles Van Patten Young, head of the 
department of physical training at Cornell, 
recently voiced the sentiments of the Kast in a 
bold and pointed talk to Cornell students. He 
said: "There is no more reason why a man 
should not be paid for playing baseball than 
for services as waiter or in any other capacity. 
If a boy can earn more money at baseball than 
at anything else, he should not be prevented 
from helping himself through college by a set 
of rules which makes him a professional if he 
does so. The test of professionalism does not 
depend upon the receipt of money for summer 
baseball playing, hut upon the question : 'Is 
the boy seeking to make a business of the game 
or not?' It is only when a man makes it a 
serious pursuit, a means of livelihood and sup- 
port, that he can be called a professional. 
The whole system has been imported from Eng- 
land, where no man is considered a gentleman 
for the purposes of athletics, at least, who has 
ever worked with his hands. Such a system 
has no place in this country, where we have no 
such class distinctions. The sooner the col- 
lege authorities admit in theory what has long 
been a fact, that they cannot stop summer 



ball, and that there is no reason why they 
should, we shall do away with the necessity for 
the assumed names and forced deception which 
is now so common among the best of our col- 
lege boys." 

The third in the series of cross-country runs 
was held Saturday. It consisted of four miles 
on the track in the city and resulted about the 
same as the previous runs. Milligan finished 
first, Bealey second, Birch third, Hastings 
fourth, Shuler fifth, Neirnan sixth, Lipperd 
seventh and Edwards eighth. Milligan's time 
was twenty-four minutes, nineteen seconds. 



Exhibition Ball Game. 

The first ball game of the season took place 
on last Monday when "the slaughter of the in- 
nocents" was enacted by St. Paul team of the 
American Association. The final score was 22 
to 1. The score was a good deal of a surprise 
as few people expected St. Paul to run up so 
large a score. However, the large score of the 
professionals was not as much of a surprise as 
was the one run scored by our boys. No one 
expected our boys to get within sight of home 
plate, so when Porter crossed it. there was a 
good deal of enthusiasm shown. 

The work of the College team was fairly sat- 
isfactory, especially at the bat. Eight hits 
were secured during the game, seven of which 
were off of McCoy, the left hander, Haynes, 
Cunningham and H. Strong each secured two 
singles, while Cave secured one single and 
Porter got a two-bagger. Al. Strong made a 
pretty sacrifice, advancing Cunningham to sec- 
ond. Miller did fine work behind the bat and 
showed much better form than he did last year. 
Both the Strong hoys did fine work in the field. 

The score: 

K. S. A. C. AB B H SH PO A K 

H. Strong. If 4 2 3 

Cunningham, ss 4 2 13 

Al. Strong, cf 3 14 

Cave, 2b 3 I 12 

Mallon. p 3 11 

Myers, ss 1 o 1 3 

Porter, rf ;t 1 1 o o o 

Haynes, lb 4 2 10 2 B 

Miller, e 4 o t 

Davis, Sit 3 o o u o o i 

Fury, p 1 1 2 

Totals 33 1 h 1 f)f 12 7 

St. Paul. ah k h sh po a e 

<Jeier, If 8 110 2 

Wheeler. lib 7 2 4 3 10 

VanSaut, cf B 1 1 o 1 o o 

PtBdl.lh 6 2 2 6 

Kemmer, rf !J 3 1 

Padden. 2i> 5 4 3 2 4 

Rand, ss 4 2 1 2 3 5 

Lutfden, c 6 4 4 1 I 

K to villi, p 2 2 10 1 1 

McCoy , p 2 1 2 1 1 

Totals 49 22 20 2 27 13 2 

By innings: 

SHE 

St. Paul 0—6—3-1—4—0-0—2-6=22 20 2 

K. S. A. C .0—0—0-0-1—0—0—0—0=1 8 7 




■ -vfl 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



365 



Webster Troubles, 

At a time later than usual, which the writer 
will not state as he does not think it necessary 
to inform the public of our shortcomings, Pres- 
ident Kirk called the Websters to order and 
startled some of the more wide awake members 
by announcing that we again needed a new set 
of "the powers that lie." 

After roll-call, which by names unresponded 
to showed how many fathers were in need of 
help, we settled down to business and decided 
that W. A. Conner was capable of filling our 
most important position and that F. W. ('aid- 
well might t»e able to do the same in case of 
Mr. Conner's absence. We next decided that 
our two secretaries ought to l>e stern, business- 
like fellows, who would not gaze too frequently 
at the fair visitors of the society, and with this 
object in view we elected J. E. Brock as record- 
ing secretary and S. W. Cunningham as cor- 
responding secretary. 

After trusting Fred Winters with the money 
and giving H. A. Coldwell license to tell us our 
faults, we made a grevious mistake by present- 
ing James A. Lupfer with the office of marshal, 
which he accepted with much ado. 

Jimmie Coxen, after a little coaxing, said 
he just wouldn't do it— that is", be chairman of 
the program committee— so we elected two more 
jolly fellows, Jay Smith and Jorg'ey, who de- 
clared that they could make out the first pro- 
gram without a chairman. It tickled us so 
much to think that we had at least two willing 
members that we decided to let Coxen think it 
over a week. 

After paying off our debts and wrangling 
over some important subject that I do not at 
this moment recall, we picked up all the coats 
and hats we could find and took them out in 
the moonlight to identify them. S. w. c. 

Ag. Association. 

In the absence of the president and vice- 
president, both of whom are out of College, M. 
L. Walter acted as chairman. 

After being led in devotion by Archie Con- 
ner, the following new men were initiated to 
the "Order of Agriculturists:" Joe Montgom- 
ery, W. T. McCall, Jim Brock and W. J 
Brown. We then proceeded to elect officers as 
follows: Archie Conner, president; W. E. 
Watkins, vice-president: W. B. Gernert, sec- 
retary ; Jim Brock, corresponding secretary ; 
R. W. Hull, critic; J. S. Montgomery, treas- 
urer; R. Gilbert, Marshal; Billy Brown, as- 
sistant. Caldwell, McCall, Cudney, Lambert, 
Walter, Snapp, and Cooley were elected to 
vacancies in committees. 

Gernert announced that the medals for the 



winners in the stock-judging contest were 
ready for free distribution and after disposing 
of the necessary business "weall" made a 
"hike" for athletics in the city park. 

"WIT.L BE GOOD." 



ionians. 

As this was election day our program con- 
sisted of music. The first number was a vocal 
solo by Master Carnahan. accompanied by his 
sister. Duets were given by Kate Hutchinson 
and Anna Tolin on the piano and Madge Mar- 
tin and Miss Parker on the banjo and the gui- 
tar. 

Miss Stump and Laura Lyman furnished vo- 
cal solos and Helen Westgate a guitar solo. 
Bessie Nicolet and Grace Hawkins gave piano 
solos. The Biddison sisters sang a duet. Our 
business was interesting. The following offi- 
cers were elected: President, Alma McRae; 
vice-president, Margaret Cunningham; record- 
ing secretary, Blanche Robertson: correspond- 
ing secretary, Bessie Nicolet: treasurer, Nell 
Wolfe. E. b. 

Hamps. 

For the next to the last time in his life did C. 
I. Weaver call the Hamps. to order. Taking 
advantage of our opportunity, we proceeded 
soon after to the business of the evening. 
When the fog had cleared away the following 
officers had been elected: President, C. E. 
Davis; vice-president, A. D. Hollo way; record- 
ing secretary, C. G. Nevins; corresponding 
secretary, Jaek Ryan; treasurer, W. B. Ger- 
nert; critic, M. M. Hastings; marshal, H. A. 
Praeger: assistant marshal, J. H. Cheney; 
board of directors— Ross (chairman), McCall, 
Adams, Long and Cudney; program com- 
mittee—White (chairman), Hawkinson and 
Williams. What we did in the furious closed 
session is a secret. At eleven o'clock we pro- 
ceeded to trade hats. J. H. c. 



Alpha Beta. 

We had a very good program Saturday, in 
spite of the fact that it was election day. 

After singing and devotion, Misses Tolin 
and Hutchinson played a duet; Miss Stump 
sang a solo; Skinner read a paper on "Tem- 
perance in Keeping Late Hours;" Phillips 
expounded upon "Various Forms of Intem- 
perance;" Miss Willis read a temperanee 
piece: and Miss Needham gave a reading. 

The following officers were elected: E. W. 
Matherly, president; Anna Tolin, vice-presi- 
dent; Walter Zahnley, secretary; Eva Als- 
paugh, corresponding secretary ; Hallie Reed, 
treasurer: N. F. Cornelius, marshal. 

M. 0. S. 



see 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motw LrrEvtsv 

OM CviTIVATt Ml» 
OWM Of N)« •+• 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, In advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 

C. E. Whipple. '07 Editor-in-cblef 

GBOVKnKAHL,*07 Business Manager 

MAY Gkiffing. '07 Literary Editor 

I* E. Gaston. '08 Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham. '08 Exchange Editor 

II. R. Hillman. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. E. Broth. '08 Subscription Manager 

GHACE HAWKrNR.'08 » Ascnc T^m'slI UMitnr** 

A . G. PHILLIPS, '07 t ASSOC ' L " oca ' Mlt0IS 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

Jas. K. Coxen. '08 Reporter 

All orders Tor subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

. Elizabeth Sweet. '04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan,, Apr. 5, 1906. 




Did you ever think how disrespectful and 
mean it is to go to chapel and sit while others 
stand during the singing. 



Before you act, examine yourself to make 
sure it is what you intend. Do not be misled 
by wrong impressions regarding your own 
standard of behavior. 



Some of our upper classmen are dropping 
out of school relinquishing the prospects of 
the coveted sheepskin. Does it take until a 
junior's ninth term or until a senior's last term 
for an instructor to find him mentally incapa- 
ble? Is it right to discourage a fellow at the 
eleventh hour. 



During last term a great many failures were 
made— a larger per cent than is usual. As a 
result there is much ill-feeling toward the in- 
structors and they are not wholly blameless. 
The success of an instructor is not measured 



by the number of failures in his classes but by 
the percentage who pass. The whole blame is 
not placed on the Faculty, however, nor do we 
attribute it to lack of ability on the students' 
part. For with this large number of failures 
comes the statement by many, that cheating 
in examinations was never so prevalent. Fail- 
ures and cheating are results of a misunder- 
standing between student and instructor. The 
student imagines the examination will be un- 
fair, and consequently he resorts to unfair 
methods in order to pass. The surprising fea- 
ture of it is that he openly acknowledges that 
he cheated and cites reasons to justify it. 
Granting that the test is unfair, it is no won- 
der, for how does an instructor know whether 
a point is made clear when half of the fellows 
depend on copying from books or "ponies." 
Some instructors encourage cheating by busy- 
ing themselves grading papers of previous 
classes, and pay no attention to the test in 
progress. We would suggest a cure. There 
should be an organization of students pledged 
to eradicate this evil and to suspend without 
action of the Faculty any one who persists in 
cheating. In this manner we could secure a 
fair test. The instructor could grade compar- 
atively whereas now the good student suffers 
because of the misdeeds of the unprincipled. 
Were this plan adopted it would no doubt re- 
duce the number of failures and result in a 
squarer deal for both students and Faculty. 
Something must be done. It is deplorable 
that college students will indulge in a practice 
which only weakens and destroys character. 



Resolutions. 

We, the class of '07, do hereby extend our 

sincere and heartfelt sympathy to our friend 

and classmate, Ethel McDonald, in this the 

sad hour of her bereavement. 

Bea Alexander, 
May Griffing, 
E. C. Farrar, 

Committee. 

Resolutions. 

Whereas, Death has entered into the homes 
of our classmates, Stella Ballard, Alice 
Southern and Mabel McDonald, be it 

Resolved, That we, the members of the class 
of '09, extend to them our heartfelt sympathy, 
and be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be published 
in the Herald and a copy be sent to each of 
the bereaved ones. 

H. B. Johnson, 
Grace E. Letjszler, 
Kathleen Selby, 

Committee. 



ttfll 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



367 



'< We've dot Somethln' Comla' to Us. " 

Basket-ball's a thtnjr of yore. 
It's way back there behind the door, 
Baseball's strunirliritr into line. 
All boys trying for the nine. 

There's no distinction in their ranks, 
Prom B flat preps, to senior cranks, 
Thev've trot the fever no mistake. 
They'll have it till the nine they make. 

They're practicing most mighty hard 
In streets, in alleys, or ones front yard. 
And even in their rooms sometimes 
They pitch the ball to make the nine. 

Frightened farmers with milk and eggs 
Grasp tight reins when 'neath the legs 
Of fractious steeds that ball is turned 
And gash out quick. "Well I'll be!!!!VY? " 

At last the nine is herded In. 
How they smile and how they grin, 
But still they work for K. A. C. 
To make it what it ought to be. 

The first game's called, and out they come 
To win that game or quit, by gum! 
O, here they are! and now the cheers 
Of Rooters' clubs ring in their ears. 

Now when the boys come marching out 
And hear the sound of that mighty shout 
Opposing teams shake in their shoes, 
For they're dead sure they're going to lose. 

And lose they do. most every time 
To our most steadfast mighty nine: 
And oh! the glory there will be 
As they keep winning for K. A. C. 

H. c. w., '07. 
m. L. g„ "07. 



Exchanges. 

The United States has five hundred seventy- 
nine mountain peaks over 12,000 feet high, and 
yet the country doesn't look so very peaked at 
that. 

The late President Haper. of Chicago Uni- 
versity, entered college at the age of ten, 
graduating at fourteen. He took a subject in 
Hebrew for his graduation thesis. 

The college presidents, who recently con- 
vened at Washington, reported that the stu- 
dents of Louisiana have the most highly de- 
veloped honor system in the U. S.— Ex. 

E. H. Sothern and Julia Marlowe have 
offered to contribute $1000 as the nucleus of a 
fund for the establishment of a chair of dra- 
matic art at George Washington University. 

The plan for founding an ideal farm, to be 
managed by Harvard men, has now been fully 
developed. A situation will be obtained in the 
Shenandoah Valley, Va., and a stock company 
will be established. Several New York busi- 
ness men have offered to back the undertaking 
financially. 

Chieago University has added a new course 
to its curriculum called "Vacation Days in 
France, a Trip for Study and Pleasure." The 
course will cover a ten- weeks' stay in Paris 
under the direction and supervision of French 
professors there, and upon examination will 
count for credit toward a school of education 
degree. 



Eurodelphian Society. 

At the meeting of the Eurodelphian society 
Saturday, the following officers were elected: 
President, Gabriella Venard: vice-president, 
Marie Coons ; recording secretary, Adah Lewis; 
corresponding secretary, Winifred Dal ton ; 
critic, Grace Smith; treasurer, Etta Carolton; 
marshal, Ruth Elliot. e. m. 

Financial Statement of Chorai Union. 

RECEIPTS. 

Prom sale of tickets IM4{j 50 

From other sources » <*> 

Total **5S 50 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Advertising. $ 37 1H 

Heat and Light... 2 00 

Outside Talent 30 00 

Banquet 42 110 

Programs • ™ 

Decorations ' 3 *j 

Incidentals | 52 

Y.M.C. A 100 00 

Y. W. C. A 100 00 

Choral Union 100 W 

Reserve Fund • 1< *" 

Total *M53 50 

E. L. Shattuck, Trm#. 



Additional Local. 

Some of the junior vests that appeared Tues- 
day morning were fearfully and wonderfully 
constructed, 

Jorgenson has been asked to deliver a series 
of lectures on sewing before the Domestic Art 
Department. 

Rumor says that the cadets are to take part 
in the Odd Fellow's Celebration at Eureka 
Lake, April 26. 

Professor Kammeyer went to Topeka, March 
24, and acted as one of the judges of the Wash- 
burn-Baker debate. 

Every Y. M. C. A. man is urged to be pres- 
ent at the Thursday evening meeting. A. D. 
Holloway is leader. 

Miss Ursu Joslin was called home last week 
by the sudden death of her sister, Miss Edith 
Joslin, student last year. 

Mr. George Manchester passed through Man- 
hattan one day last week and stopped for a 
short time to call on friends. 

Superintendent Rickman moved Monday to 
the Judge Story property, at 7th and Humboldt. 
Having purchased this property he intends to 
make it more attractive. 

C. G. Anderson has offered a Schmelzer tro- 
phy to the man on the baseball team making 
the highest batting average for the season. 
The cup is of silver and consists of three bats 
on a pedestal supporting a baseball. All who 
have seen it say it is the "swellest ever." 
Contestants must play in more than one-half 
of the games that are played by the team. 



368 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 




Zuck liusa now private secretary. 

Fine watch and jewelry repair in g a specialty 
at Askren's. 

The first Musical Keeital will be held April 
12 at 8 P. M. 

Louise Fleming spent last week at her home 
at Tecumseh. 

Eliphalet Patee, a former student, visited 
here March 2X 

E. W. Matherly is just recovering from a 
case of mumps. 

Assignor: "Where do vou roomy" Miss X: 
"At Uncle Will's." 

There seems to ha several "cases" in the 
senior and junior classes. 

Go to Askren, the expert watch and jewelry 
repairer. All work guaranteed. 

Mr. Heath's headquarters are at the Ani- 
mal Husbandry office these days. ■ 

The band will have their pictures taken soon, 
for the class book and catalogue. 

Eight seniors are taking advanced dairying 
as a means of working out their theses. 

Caroline Morton took a week's vacation 
between terms with her parents in Topeka. 

Prof. O. Erf has left for a three-weeks' insti- 
tute trip. He was in St. Mary's Saturday. 

Have you seen the K. S. A. C. pins at Ask- 
ren's jewelry store. New styles just received. 

Miss Lorena Clemons entertained her Sun- 
day-school class at her home one evening re- 
cently. 

The transfer company reported that every 
one of their rigs was engaged for the game last 
Monday. 

A new butter maker has been employed by 
the Dairy Department. He comes direct from 
Denmark. 

The "Hort." colt of last year has been ban- 
ished; a newer, blacker and smaller edition 
has arrived. 

Miss Mae Wood, principal of the Riley 
schools, visited her brother Tom Wood and 
wife last week. 

L. B. Streeter is a new assistant to Professor 
TenEyck. He called the roll in one of his 
classes Saturday. 

The battalion is drilling on Saturday now in 
order to be prepared for the inspection which 
is to be held soon. 



Professor Ten Eyek was almost laid up with 
a bad cold last Saturday. He could hardly 
talk to his classes. 

Earle Thurston left Monday for Burr Oak, 
Kan., where he has a position with a local 
telephone company. 

Miss Karin Lindskog, who has been visiting 
with Professor Valley and wife, returned to her 
home in Chicago last week. 

The Military Department had thirty boys at 
work Monday morning, denning up the equip- 
ment and getting ready for inspection. 

The wheat, oats and barley planted by the 
Farm Department in February* a re doing nicely. 
The late snows and freezing seemed to do the*m 
no harm. 

Walter Zahnly will go to Leonard vi lie to- 
morrow to take charge of the examination for 
county diplomas which takes place to-morrow 
and Saturday. » 

A mistake was made in checking up the bills 
for the basket- i tall season. The deficit for the 
season was only 98*44 instead of $20 as re- 
ported last week. 

The latest bulletins sent out by Professor 
Willard, of the experiment station, on "Ar- 
mour's Deodorized Meat-meal" are heavily 
perfumed with violet. 

Professor Dickens recently attended good 
roads meetings at Lamed, Garden City and 
Hutchinson, where the advantages of oiled 
roads were discussed. 

The juniors elected the following officers for 
this term: Joe Montgomery, president; Mar- 
garet Cunningham, vice-president; Miss Van- 
Liow, secretary: Kupper, marshal. 

The HERALD staff went down to Wolf's 
studio last Thursday and got "shot" The re- 
sult will he used as space filler in the '06 Ban- 
ner and in the Herald this spring. 

Professor Kinzer was in Kansas City the 
early part of the week. He is trying to arrange 
for a' student stock-judging contest to be held 
at the Royal Stock Show this fall. 

From the Mnrnfmll County Kew* we learn that 
K. K. Evans visited them recently and that 
"He is not afraid of work and he is not afraid 
of study and he has the natural ability to make 
both win. He holds the job of assistant press- 
man in the College Printing Department." 

J. A. Lupfer took a vacation the other day 
and went "gunning." He had a good rifle and 
saw plenty of game, but bis ammunition failed 
to 'go off about two thirds of the time. 
After spending a half day in a fruitless attempt 
to bring down something big, he returned to 
town to find that he had been using center-fire 
cartridges in a rim-fire rifle. 

The officials of the Athletic Association have 
announced that seats in the old grand stand 
at Athletic Park will be ten cents for men and 
free for ladies. This will be the price for each 
game or track meet. The season tickets- for 
the new grand stand are still on sale at $1 
each. Baseball season tickets at $1.50 can be 
obtained until the day of the Nebraska game. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



369 



i 



NEW CLOTHING 



NEW SHOES 
NEW HATS 



NEW GOODS arriving daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for, us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: :; :: :: :: 



Meet our 



BT JOHN COONS, of Course 



Walk/Over 

Shoes 



• 

J 

5 






Irvin Harold has left school and gone to 
Lawrence. 

Don Neer has left school to go to work in 
Kansas City. 

The Farm Department has purchased a new 
span of mules for $400. 

Wilher informed us that lie really had his 
hair cut two weeks ago. 

Did you see "Legs'' Thurston wheeling rock 
for the new building down town? 

Several students will go on the excursion to 
the Messiah this coming Sunday. 

The Farm Department has all the small grains 
planted. The season is very late. 

Geo. Manchester of Miami county, a former 
student, visited College last week. 

Prof. J. T. Willard was absent from College 
three days last week on account of sickness. 

The tire house, at the north end of the main 
building, has been painted. Hurrah! for Mr. 
Lewis. 

The Dairy Department is holding experi- 
ments with some milk sent in by out-of-town 
people. 

Superintendent Lamb is working hard on the 
new poultry house. As soon as it is finished a 
laying contest will be started. 

Coach Melick has a squad of men ''skinning" 
the race track for the coming track meets. The 
track is to be made sixteen feet wide. 



"And the cat came back." Willie Brown is 
in school again after the second farewell party. 

All we could find about the sophomore class 
election, was that Miss Justin was elected 
president and C. T. Gibbon vice-president. 

There is some talk, by the students taking 
the agriculture course, of petitioning the Re- 
gents to make some changes in that course. 

Mr. P. Nemechek, of Detroit, Kan., visited 
College Friday and Saturday inquiring about 
the purchase of some seed grain and shade 
trees. 

Last Tuesday night the seniors held a recep- 
tion for their victorious basket-ball team. A 
flash-light picture was taken during the latter 
part of the evening. 

Assistant Kyle has started his soil moisture 
experiments again, with reference to the spring 
condition of the soil, resulting from the growth 
of different crops the preceding year. 

Harvey B. Hubbard, of the senior class, has 
dropped out of College to accept a position 
with the Santa Fe Railroad Co. He will he 
stationed at Ratoon, N. M. Mr. Huhhard ex- 
pects to return next year and complete his 
course in electrical engineering. 

Coach Melick has made out a sort of program 
for track team practice this spring. On account 
of being unable to be at more than one place 
at one time, he will coach the sprinters at 4:30, 
the distance runners at 4: 45, the hurdlers at 
5:00, the weight throwers at 5:15 and the vaulters 
and jumpers at 5:30. 



WE WILL GIVE AWAY FREE 



A Magnificant Trophy Cup 

To the member of the K. S. A. C. baseball team who has the highest batting average. 
We carry the most complete line of Baseball and Tennis Goods in the city and invite 
comparison. OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT. 

ANDERSON'S BOOKSTORE 



370 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 



Headquarters for College Text-Books 
and College Supplies of all Kinds 



Keufl'el & Esser Line of Drawing Material 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

University Perfection Separate- Leaf Note -Books 

We also have many Second -hand Text* Books at mticb less price 

Spalding's Line of Baseball Goods 



Prices Guaranteed as low as the lowest 



311 Poyntz Avenue 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Eva Burtncr, '05, is home after a successful 
winter's teaching at McDowell Creek school 
near Manhattan. 

Mrs. Jessie (Travis) Cook, senior last year, 
is in College this term and expects to graduate 
with the 'flfi class. 

Margaret Cole, '05, has just closed a success- 
ful term of teaching near" Wakefield and is at 
home on College Hill. 

Professor Dickens recently met Guy Morris, 
student in '94, at Garden City where he is pro- 
prietor of a drug store. 

W. A. Hendershot, '04, has just finished a 
terra of school near Pills worth and will take 
some advanced work here this term. 

W. S. Wright, senior in 1904, who has been 
attending Drake University since, is about 
College and intends to complete the course 
here this year. 

C. A. Gilkison, of the senior class, has com- 
pleted his work and left recently for his home 
near Lamed where he will engage in stock- 
raising with his father. 

Mr. Fred Walter, '02, has resigned his posi- 
tion with the Higinbotham Coal Co., and left 
Monday to take a new position with the Stites' 
Cement Co., of Trinidad, Colo. 

While on an institute trip recently, Pro- 
fessor Dickens met J. H. Fee, short-course 
student in 1901, J. W. Hartnett, freshman in 
'03, and J. A. McFadden, short-course, '05. 
All are prosperous farmers near Stafford. 

J. W. Joss, junior about '02, and Mrs. Emily 
(Wiest) Joss are visiting relatives in Manhat- 
tan before going to their future home in Fair- 
view. Mr. Joss recently graduated from the 
Kansas City Veterinary College with the de- 
gree of D. f . S. 

Recent letters from Isaac Jones, '94, report 
the fruit association which he is managing 
near Etiwamda, Cal., as very successful. They 
say Bert Thompson, '05, who is with him, is 
all right except that he persists in getting up 
at five o'clock in the morning. 

The inspection of the battalion will take 
place May 1. 



April showers bring May jiggers. 

Miss Erma Gammon visited in the country 
over Sunday. 

Miss Hope Palmer, student last year, is back 
in College this term. 

Mrs. Esdon, of Olsburg, is visiting her 
daughter Harriet this week. 

Miss Helen Halm was out of College with a 
sprained ankle a few days last week. 

Work on the new Horticultural building is 
being pushed since the good weather arrived. 

Miss Irma Church went to Smith Center Mon- 
day. She does not expect to return to College 
this term. 




THE GOOD 

Clothes 

STORE 



SEE OUR NEW 

Rain Coats 
Top Coats 
Suits 

Shirts and 
Hats 

The man who does 
not know what he wants 
for his Spring Suit can 
put in a very pleasant 

b. Kiippenheimeri co. nau-nour in finding it 



at 



E, L Knostman s 






THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



371 



New and 2f^" 
School Books 



Spectacles 
Gold Pens 



R. E. L0F1NCK 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, Notions and 

Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



K, S. A. C. Directory, 

HAMILTON HOCnffTY. 

President C. E. Davis 

Vice-president . .,, A. D. Holloway 

Secretary O. G, Nevins 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock In north society 
hall. 

WEBSTKB SOCIETY. 

President W. A. Conner 

Vice-president P. W. Caldwell 

Secretary J. E. Brock 

Meets Saturday eventnir at 7:30 o'clock in south society 
hall. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY. 

President ..E. W. Matherly 

Vice-president. Anna Tolin 

Secretary Walter Zahnly 

Meets in south society hall at 2:<M> p. H. 

FRANKLIN SOCIBTY. 

President E. L. Shattuck 

Vice-president Almira Kerr 

Secretary 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 7:30 p. M. 

IONIAN 80CIBTY. 

President Alma McRae 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Blanche Robertson 

Meets in north society hall Saturday at 2:45 p. m . 

EUBODKLPHIAN SOCIWTY. 

President ...Gabriella Venard 

Viee-president Marie Coons 

Secretary - Adah Lewis 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 2:45 p. m. 

y. m. c. A. 

President A. D. Hollo way 

Vice-president 0. E. W hippie 

Secretary ...,R. W. Hull 

General Secretary W. W. McLean 

Sunday afternoon meetings in Association parlors, at 
3:30. 

Y. W. C. A. 

President .' Flora Hull 

Vice-president. Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Ella V. Brooks 

General Secretary '■ - - - Miss Thayer 

Weekly meeting during noon hour each Saturday in 
south society hall. The Home, 617 Manhattan Ave. 

ENGINEERS' ABfltK'IATTON. 

President J. L. Dow 

Vice-president Smith Faris 

Secretary W. W. Carlson 

Meets Saturday evening in C 60 at 7:30. 

AGRICULTURAL ASSCX NATION. 

President - W. A. Conner 

Viee-president. W. E. Watkins 

Secretary W. B. Gernert 

Meets Saturday at 2:30 in Ag. Hall. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

President E. L. Adams 

Vice-president A. D. Hollo way 

Secretary C. E. Whipple 

General Manager Prof. <3. A. Dean 

Meets at call of the president. 

CIULS" ROOTERS' CLUB. 

President Stella Campbell 

Secretary ■■ • ■ • ■■ .Neva Larson 

Leader..* ■ Laura Lyman 

BOYS* ROOTERS' CLUB. 

Chairman A. D. Hoiloway 

Vice-chairman if*-?*JSSSE Bn 

Secretary B.H. Wilber 

Treasurer J- » Brack 

Meets at the call of the chairman. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop, 



Goto 



R, V, Dyer 



For Sheet Music, Pianos, Pictures, 
Wall-paper, and Paint 

West Room, Union National Bank Building 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best. X. X> 

W. M. STINGLEY & CO. 



GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Floe line of cigars and toilet 
articles. Razors boned. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boardingr Stable. 

11*3 Poyntz Ave., - Phone 53. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs tine line cigars and toilet articles 



How the 



Fills Itself 



Just a quick, simple pressure of the thumb and Conklin's Self- 
Filling Pen is completely filled. A collapsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel of the pen compresses, and when released, instantly draws in 
the ink through the feed channels at the point, filling the Conklin 
Pen ready to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. Dis- 
penses entirely with the old-fashioned drop-filler method. So simple 
that you can't go wrong — you can't get your fingers inky, or entail 
any loss of time. The lock-ring shown in the lower left hand cor- 
ner prevents the ink from being forced out after reservoir has been 
filled, either when pen is in use or in the pocket. 

The ORIGINAL and ONLY GENUINE 

Conklin's Self-Filling Pen 

is a marvel that has completely revolutionized fountain 
pen construction. Its surprising simplicity combined with 
utmost care in manufacture, makes it practically proof to 
trouble of any sort. Responds at the first touch to the 
paper — flows evenly and regularly until the last drop of 
ink is exhausted. Ink capacity as large as old style 
fountain pens, yet it never overflows when in use. 
Presser-bar prevents pen from rolling off a sloping surface, 
and is so arranged as not to be in the way when writing. 
Feed channels are thoroughly cleaned in the same easy way 
as filling. All Conklin Pens are unconditionally guaran- 
teed to fulfill all claims we make. 
If your dealer does nouhandle the Conklin Pen* let us 
make you our Special Offer to Fountain Ten Users. 
Full information , with illustrated catalog, 
sent upon request. 
Sold by Dealers Everywhere. 

TIE CONUJN PEN €0. 

114, Sit, SIS 



tf 



t 



, 



■M 



acsasv 



3P 



mmmm 



I 

x 
x 
x 
x 
x 
x 

X 






*^ H C* v4* wCi ^ t* v^* w'C* ^ 



W. S. ELLIOT 






Students' Corduroy Trousers 
Yale Pattern, The Very 
Latest. -:- Price, $4.00 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING * * 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



***«***«*«***^^^ 



% 

* 

* 

i 







20 per cent off 



on everything in our store % 

a On every $1.00 purchase and over, up 3 
g to and including; April 10, 1906 * 

* ^^ s 

j^ We carry a big line of g 

£ pasteries, photo supplies, house furnish- 5 

g) ings, ladies' & mens furnishings & other useful articles M 

*] - X 

jS AT THE 

i — 



Big Racket 



(^o»m«i 








%\xc Students 1 Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 





:■ 



WASHBURN vs. K. S. A. G 

Saturday* 3s45 p.m. 






■ 




■ 



1.' 



.'■ 



! 




DAIRY SWEEPSTAKES JK CREAMERY SWEEPSTAKES 



OHIO 
Grand Sweepstakes 
Daily Sweepstakes 
Creamery Sweepstakes 

at the Ohio State Dairymen's 
Convention held at Dayton, Jan- 
uary 84-38. Creamery score, 97|; 
farm dairy , 97. 



WISCONSIN 
Grand Sweepstakes 

at the Wisconsin State Dairy- 
men's Convention at Waukesha, 
Jan. SO to Feb. t. Score, 97$, 




CONNECTICUT 
Grand Sweepstakes 

at the Connecticut State Dairy- 
men's Convention at Hartford, 
January 1748. Score «. 



MAINE 

Dairy Sweepstakes 

at the Maine State Dairymen's 
Convention at Ptttafleld, De- 
cember VI. Score 071. 



The United States Separator Holds World's Record far Closest 5eparatlen Of cream, and above Is 
another of the many lists of victories which show that The United States Separator Delivers the Cream 
In Smoothest and Best Condition to make the finest quality of butter. Fru Catalog™ on application. 

VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO, / • Bellows Fall* Vt- 



U 



IIOHTIIM D1STMIBUTIH* W«MH«Utn THROUGHOUT TMK UN 



•Tj» 



*ND CANAO* 










Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



FOR 

Ice-cream and 

Icecream sodas 



GOTO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

' Manufacturers of 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. Disc Cultivators. Safety 
Corn Harvesters, LltUe Wonder Churns, Perfection 
Lawn Swings, Oak Stoves, Sash Weights, Chimney Caps, 
Qaat-iron Hog Troughs. Structural Iron Work, Stove Re- 
pairs, etc. 



*• •• 



MANHATTAN, 



KANSAS 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pia*. Wrtnh * JnrMry Bjfilrtu 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted ft 

Heated Busses 

ft Hacks 




Day and night 
Meet all trains day or night, 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for hall 
games, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: ;: :: » ;; » 



H.J. 



PHONE 65 





THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



373 






Can furnish you with your College supplies. KEUFFEL & 
BS5BR Drawing Instruments, EUGENE DIETZGEN Drawing 
Material, WATERMAN'S IDEAL Fountain Pens. 

Up-to-date Stationery. Special orders receive prompt attention, 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. 8r P. Ry, 

Geo. T, Fielding & Sons. 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 

Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NGS 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Walt for 
Phone 157 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

AI ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEADER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



Orr 



f STUDIO is the place to get 

S PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: :: 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 

The Pantatorium 



Get your clothes cleaned and pressed 
Call and see our prices. 



1218 

Moro St. 



R. W. Oakes, Prop, 



Portraits 

COLLEGE 

VIEWS 

Wolfs 

STUDIO 

Opposite City Library 



374 



THE STUDENTS' HKKALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




GOODS 

Suitable for graduating and 
ela^s -day dresses, which we 
will be pleased to show you. 

French lawn. 50 inches wide, 
50 cents a yard 

French lawn. 48 inches wide, 
35 cents a yard 

Persian lawns, 20c, 25c. and 
35c per yard. 

Bilk mulls In all colors and 
white, 50 cents a yard. 

Printed silk mulls, beautiful 
patterns. 50 cents a yard. 

White Habutai Silk, 75 cents a 
yard. 

White China silk. 27 inches 
wide, 50 cents a yard. 



LADIES' READY-TO- 
WEAR GARMENTS. 

We can save you money on 
your Easter frown. Easter is the 
time when every lady most de- 
sires a new gown or waist. We 
now have open for your inspec- 
tion one of the moat beautiful 
and complete lines of Easter 
ready-to-wear (roods ever shown, 
consisting of Fancy Waists in 
Chiffon, Taffeta, Net, All-over 
lace, Mull, Swiss, and Jap Silk in 
many different styles. 

Our white costumes are beau- 
ties, made of sheer white mull 
elaborately trimmed with valen- 
cienne lace and insertion. 

Also some very dainty dresses 
of India linen made in the latest 
styles, panel of embroidery and 
eyelet work in front of waist and 



skirts. You will be pleased when 
you see them. 

The white wool skirts are very 
pretty. They come in serge, 
voile, Panamas and Mohair. 

Ladies' Gymnasium Slippers, 
$1.00 and $1.35 

McCall Patterns, 10c and 15c, 
None Higher. 



IN H A R D- 



EVERYTHING 
WARE. 

BEST GROCERIES 
LOWEST PRICES. 



AT 



Murdock's Coffees, 
O. P. T. Extracts. 
Manhattan Baking Powder. 
Money back if not pleased. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone HH Tor Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Heady -to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 






GET BUSY 




But don't work and worry yourself to 
death to find style and comfort in 
SHOES, but go direct to 

THE LEADER 

They carry a complete line of Dry-Goods and 
Furnishings at lowest cash price. 



Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Kirksville.Mo.. 
and late of the Treating Staff of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free or charge. :: :: :: :: :: :: 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office. 134-2 

Bank Bldg.. Rooms 15-20. Res.. 134-3 



PROFESSION A L. 



DK. G. A. CKISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should he convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DK. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room 16. Union National Bank Building 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc 5tuocnts Or The 
Kansas Statc Agricultural Coli_E6C 

MottorLetEvejyOne Cultivate His OoinGenias. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., April 12, 1906. 



Number 29 



A Lucky Accident. 

(Continued.) 

"Harry Brayton! Oh! it can't be." 

"Yes, yes, Pris, I am Harry Brayton and 
Oh! believe me Pris, I am innocent." 

"Harry, don't," cried Pris in an agitated 
voice, "Go away at once. What shall I do? 
Oh! this is awful." 

"Pris, this is unbearable! Can't you trust 
me again as you used to?" 

"What! trust Harry Brayton, the escaped 
convict, as I used to trust Harry Brayton, the 
gentleman? Impossible!" 

The man's face was pale and haggard as he 
replied in a steady firm voice, "Very well, I 
must go to your camp for some one else then." 

As he was turning to leave, Pris cried, 
"Wait! you mustn't go, for they might recog- 
nize you." 

"Of course," he replied, "but what differ- 
ence does it make if they do?" 

"It makes lots of difference," wailed Pris. 
"1— I, don't believe you did it." 

"Pris!" was all he could say in his joy and 
surprise. 

A few hours later the members of the party 
who had remained at home were surprised to 
see Pris limp into the light from a dark cluster 
of trees. In a short time the searching parties 
were gathered together and were plying Pris 
with questions, but all they found out was that 
she had hurt her foot, was tired, and wanted to 
go to bed at once. Nothing more would she 
say, although they did their best to find out 
about her mysterious appearance. They had 
intended to move camp the next day, but 
Priscilla's foot was so bad that they concluded 
to stay until it was better. Pris walked a little 
each day, but she suffered a good deal from 
the injury. 

One night as the young people sat around 
the fire, talking and telling stories, the con- 



versation turned to a strange criminal case, 
which had recently been the main topic in the 
newspapers of the little Western town from 
which they had started. Pris and Elsie were 
from the East, so, of course, had not read the 
Western papers and were therefore very much 
interested in the discussion. 

"Max, won't you tell Pris and me all about 
it from the very first?" asked Elsie. 

"Well, to begin with." said Max who was 
very willing to do anything that Elsie desired, 
"this young man came out West from New 
York. I don't know what for, but the papers 
said 'to do all the mischief he could. ' 

"He had not been out here long when he was 
accused and convicted of murdering Mrs. 
Hawkins, a widow about sixty years old. She 
was a friend of Harry Brayton' s mother, so he 
called there on his arrival in the town and soon 
became very well acquainted with her. He 
spent the evening with her the night of her 
death, and circumstantial evidence was very 
strong against him: in fact, quite conclusive, 
as the court decided, although no motive for 
the crime could be discovered. " 

"A few months after the conviction Brayton 
escaped from prison and .the police were unsuc- 
cessful in recapturing him. His parents were 
completely prostrated by their disgrace and 
refused to believe their son guilty. They are 
very wealthy and hired the best of detectives to 
work on the case. A few weeks ago the latter 
found out some very interesting facts. They 
proved the guilty man to be Otto Munsfort, and 
later he confessed and told the whole story. 
To be brief, both Harry Brayton and Otto 
Munsfort were in love with a New York girl, 
but Mr. Brayton was preferred by her. When 
Brayton came out West, Munsfort followed him 
with the intention of injuring him in some way. 
He saw a good opportunity and committed the 
murder, letting suspicion fall upon Brayton." 



376 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



At this point Pris, who had drawn back into 
the shadow, so that she might hide her face, 
abruptly left them. 

* 'Where's Pris going- I wonder," said Max, 
**I was just going to say tit at the police have 
l»een hunting high and low for Bray ton, hut no 
trace can be found of him." 

"Isn't it the strangest thing?" exclaimed 
Elsie. "I wish there was some more to it," 

"There probably will he some day," laughed 
John. 

Meanwhile Pris had gone a little way into 
the thicket and whistled the old call that she 
and Harry used to know so well. It had the 
desired effect, for in a moment the bushes 
parted and Harry stood before her. She could 
hardly wait to tell the good news and lie could 
scarcely realize it when he heard it. 

Soon they were standing among the other 
young people and Pris was introducing "Mr. 
Harry Br ay ton." 

"What a lucky accident!" exclaimed Mrs. 
Wei don. Allan Cooper. 



Alpha Betas. 

The Alpha Beta society opened with music, 
followed by devotion. Then the scene of "In- 
stallation of Officers" was witnessed, after 
which we proceeded with E. W. Matherly at the 
helm. Hardly had he taken his place when he 
was called out for a speech. He responded 
with as much calmness as one used to such sur- 
prises. 

"Current Events," dealing with such subjects 
of interest as, Ownership of Railroads, Sdfcial- 
isra, The Novel, The Automobile, and Niagra 
Falls, were discussed by J. II. Garver. With 
the plea that lie could not produce an "Origi- 
nal Story," as scheduled, C'has. Willard 
evaded a tine of ten cents by telling several 
second- handed stories, which brought smiles to 
all faces. Story: "Burbank and His Works." 
Mr. Streeter presented facts showing Burbank' s 
connection with the potato, the daisy, the cac- 
tus, and other plants. An interesting number 
of the "Gleaner" was read by Walter Strite, of 
the 4th division. Music: Violin duet, Miss 
Lane and Miss Hand; piano solo, Miss Hallie 
Smith. Mr. Cole gave a cornet solo, accom- 
panied by Miss Jones. All music numbers 
were well rendered and heartily enjoyed. 

Business session was lively. Miss Anna 
Monroe visited society and gave us a word of 
encouragement and advice. e. I. A. 



Harvard is expecting to do great things in 
athletics. She will soon have more men in 
training for her several athletic teams than any 
other university in this country. 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



377 



Hamps. 

In spite of the vagueness of the advertisement 
on the bulletin board and the threatening- of 
the elements, by eight o'clock Saturday evening 
a large and curious crowd had assembled to 
see what the Hamps. had in store for them. 

When at last the curtain rose it appeared to 
the casual observer that there was some mis- 
take, for instead of the Hamiltons it was seem- 
ingly the wise and dignified Faculty who ap- 
peared upon the scene. There were the cor- 
pulent forms, the eye-glasses, whiskers, bald 
heads, etc. 

The play entitled, "The Three Sides of the 
Faculty "was given in three acts. 

CAST. 

President Nichols C. E. Whipple 

Professor Remick Grabendike 

Professor McKeever C. S. Jones 

Professor McFarland C. G. Shelly 

Professor Price - R. R. White 

Professor Eyer 0. E. Davis 

Professor Cortelvou C. I. Weaver 

Professor Walters J. H. Cheney 

Miss demons O'Conner 

Mrs. Calvin .H. Bixby 

Miss Barnes Cowles 

Professor Brink L. A. Ramsey 

Professor Kammeyer A. D. Holloway 

Professor Valley E, C. Farrer 

Captain Shaffer .Percy Roberts 

Professor Roberts J. M. Ryan 

Professor Potter Elmer Johnson 

Professor Erf F. E. Brown 

Secretary Huycke E>. Ross 

Janitor Lewis Joe Montgomery 

Professor WUlarfl Hillman 

Professor Dickens L.. E. Hazen 

Distinguished Visitor 0. W. Weaver 

Students: McCall, Hastings. Pat. Brown, Prae«er, Pin- 
comb. Joe Lill, Gardner. Lonjr. Bassler, Gernert. Williams. 

Prospective student. Kittell. and her mother. Orendorff. 

ACT I. 

Scene in Prexie's office. 

Enter many students in search for informa- 
tion, excuses from drill, absence, etc. 

Enter Lewis with an unruly junior— causing 
much disturbance and frightening students 
all awav. 

ACT II. 

Chapel. 

Faculty looks wise— announcements. Only 
one student canned. Extended remarks by the 
distinguished visitor. 

act in. 

Meeting of the Faculty. 

In the scene in the President's office. Reason- 
able requests such as a few absences to be ex- 
cused were refused, while any old reason se- 
cured excuse from drill. 

The sensational parts of this act were: Hast- 
ings getting credits, Lewis and Long, Miss 
Kittell and her mother, .Orendorff, Gernert 1 s 
sore hand, Pat's corn crop, and Johnson's rep- 
resentation of Potter. 

In the Faculty meeting some were canned for 
ten unexcused absences, while others were ex- 
cused for cheating. 

Some of the best characters portrayed were 



Professors Remick and Potter and Captain 
Shaffer. Some of the actions of the Faculty 
seemed to be a little unfair, but we had best 
excuse them. J. H. c. 

Athletic Notes. 

Grover Kahl is out trying for an infield po- 
sition, either second or third. 

Help out the Athletic Association by buying 
a score-book at each game. Each book will 
contain a picture of some player as well as the 
correct line-up of each team. 

Coach Ahearn is especially anxious that 
enough men be out for baseball practice each 
day to make up two teams. The first team can do 
their best work only when they have a team to 
play against them. Then another thing to be 
remembered is that no player has his place 
''cinched" so tight hut that a better man can 
get it. 

The football-rules committee have at last an- 
nounced the changes in the rules for next year. 
The supporters of the ''open game'' have gained 
their point, and hereafter speed will be a 
necessary qualification for a football player. 
The most important changes are these: Ten 
yards must be made in three downs. One for- 
ward pass in each play will be allowed. 
Hurdling in the open field is prohibited. Six 
men only are allowed in the scrimmage line on 
defense. Tackling below the knees is pro- 
hibited. Unnecessary roughness is to be more 
severely punished. What effect the new rules 
will have on football here, it is hard to say. 
It would seem, however, that they will hurt 
some of our heavier opponents more than us. 
Our team of last year was fast rather than 
heavy, and it is the heavy team that will suffer 
by the changes. Many new plays will be in- 
vented, and it is probable that punting will 
play a much greater part than before. 

Websters. 

A goodly little group of our number, who 
succeeded in dodging in between or running 
around the "April Showers'' that were frolick- 
ing over the campus, gathered in the hall, 
where, after waiting in vain for more of their 
fellow members, the usual thing happened — 
they were called to order. 

After the habitual preliminaries, they listened 
to several musical numbers that were certainly 
more inspiring and enjoyable than the wea*ther. 
We will have to take it for granted that the 
rest of the program would have been as enjoy- 
able as the weather had its promoters enjoyed 
the weather more. S. w. c. 



"Reflect a long time, then decide promptly. 



1 1 



378 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motto: LctEvMV 

One C«fcT(v*Tt Mi» 
OwnGinpi*. --«-• 

^Printed In College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, rive cents. 

C.E. Whipple, *07 Editor-in-chief 

Ghover Kahl. '07 Business Manager 

Ma y G HiFfim;. '07 Literary Edf tor 

L. E. Gabton. '08 I^ocal Edi tor 

S. W. Cunningham. '08 Exchange Editor 

H. B. HlLLMAN,'07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. E. Bkcx'k, 'OH Subscription Manager 

GRACE HAWKrNS.'OH {. Assoc Local Editors 

A. G. PHILLIPS. '07 t •" ARS0C ' ,jOCai rMnori 

Elizabeth Swkkt. '04 Alumni Editor 

Jas. R. Uox kn. '08 Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions and Inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure Insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be bung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet, '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any Information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Apr. 12, 1906. 




Don't blame the Herald if your society 
write-up does not appear this week. All such 
write-ups must be in by Monday noon or they 
will be conspicuous by their absence. 



We wish to urge the classes who will edit the 
Herald to get busy and contribute your write- 
ups in such a way that your class will have the 
best edition this year. The interest already 
taken is encouraging. 



Three members of the Faculty have turned in 
their grand-stand tickets and have had their 
money refunded. They have also taken occa- 
sion to charge the athletic management with 
conducting a fraud. One professor states that 
he expected admission to all baseball games 
and track meets in addition to a seat in the 
new grand stand and possibly refreshments 
during the games and a banquet at the close of 
the season. Is it possible that an instructor 
here can be so little? The original plan was 



to raise the money by subscription, but since 
the subscribers are receiving full value for 
their paltry dollars they should be ashamed 
to ask that their money be refunded. So far 
no student has been guilty of a similar request. 



It is hoped that the increased appropriation 
for the Experiment Station will result in a 
better attendance of the professors at their 
classes. It seems that the College is entirely 
too unselfish with her instructors. The best 
men in the Agricultural and Dairy Depart- 
ments have been absent so much the past term 
that their classes have received practically no 
benefit from them. We are proud of our corps 
of instructors in these departments and realize 
that they have a national reputation, but when 
they spend so little time with us we are likely 
to lose some of our appreciation of them. 



A Later Report. 

Lest some reader of last week's Herald 
take for "straight goods" the sophomore 
write-up of the last so-called freshman-sopho- 
more basket-ball game, itiWill be necessary to 
disclose a few facts, which the author of 
"Athletic Notes" forgot (?) to mention. 

In the first place, the game was arranged 
simply as an amusement game for the benefit 
of the court-house clock fund. Before the 
game, the sophomores strenuously objected to 
calling it a class affair. To this the freshmen 
readily agreed, especially so since their regular 
team was not there, only three of the partici- 
pants in the first game being present. Another 
condition was, that the sophomores play decent 
basket-ball, not football as on the former 
occasion. This was faithfully promised, but 
whether or not the promise was kept will be 
remembered by the spectators. Naturally, 
under these conditions, the freshmen team 
( socalled ) would hardly play in an affcer-you- 
my-dear-Gaston style, and although the puny 
score indicated otherwise, we will leave it to 
the spectators as to who won the game at basket- 
ball. 

By what process of mind the writer of 
"Athletic Notes" conceives the game to be a 
victory for the sophomores, or that they have 
any claim whatsoever upon the championship, 
is beyond our comprehension, and until our 
team is defeated in a game of basket-ball for 
championship honors, the freshmen will con- 
tinue to hold the "undisputed title." What- 
ever else may be said of them, freshmen as well 
as upper classmen like a "square deal." 

"Freshman." 

You cannot dream yourself into a character ; 
you must hammer and forge yourself one. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Be Cheerful. 

Preps; 

If the others call you green. 
Don't get mad and call them "mean." 
Just prove you're wiser than you seem, 
And be cheerful. 

FKERHrKS: 

If you're homesick and feel "new,*" 
Don't (five up and get so blue; 
Make up your mind you'll live It through. 
And keep on being cheerful. 

Sophiks: 

When your brain begins to swell 
And your head enlarges— well 
Keep the secret, never tell. 
But be cheerful. 

J0NTOH8: 

If the Profs benignly stare. 
Think you're cracked— somewhere up there. 
And your head is mostly air 
Why, be cheerful. 

Sknioks: 

If the Faculty should frown 
When your antics bring renown 
And discreetly turn you down, 
.lust be cheerful. 

Faculty : 

Are the students dull and slow 
And 'twould seem their heads were dough 
Fail them, then, and let them go. 
Feeling cheerful. 



All: 



If sweethearts give you a stab 

In your latest close confab 

And you've lost your "gift of gab." 

For goodness sake keep cheerful. 



M. G. 



Ionian Society. 

Owing- to the fact that the Ex-Ionians had 
full charge of the program April 7, the society 
met in the Eurodelphian hall, which was ap- 
propriately decorated, instead of in the Ionian 
Hall. 

After roll-call and installation of officers for 
the new term, the Ex-Ios. proceeded with the 
program, Mrs. J. E. Brock, '91, presiding. 
The first number was an instrumental solo by 
Miss Lois Stump, '04, who responded to an en- 
core. A very interesting original story, writ- 
ten by Mrs. Wilma (Cross) Rhodes, '04, was 
read by Miss Helder. Very pleasing solos 
were rendered by Mrs. Brock and Miss Mamie 
Helder, '04. Miss Alice Loomis. '04, read an 
interesting and well-written paper on "Books," 
by Miss Mary Lee, a charter member. Miss 
Sarah Hough am, '03, read an excellent number 
of an alumni edition of the "Oracle." The 
program closed with a play on Sherlock 
Holmes, conducted by Miss Ada Rice, '95, as- 
sisted by Misses Holroyd, Minis, Cowles, 
Loomis, and Gertrude Stump. 

The Ionians were certainly as pleased to 
hear from the Ex-Ios. as the Ex-Ios. were to be 
back and recall the days when they were 
actively engaged in society work. B. m. N. 



Patrons of the College lecture course ! The 
Chicago Glee Club will open their program 
promptly at 7:45 as they have to leave on an 
early train. 




Some fellows have got in the habit of swiping 
the baseball posters off the bulletin boards. 
One of the posters for the Nebraska game was 
taken the day it was put up and the other was 
taken the following day. There is no reason why 
this should occur. The posters will do just as 
well for room decorations after they have served 
their purpose advertising the games as they 
will before. If a fellow really can't wait till 
after the game for a poster, he may be able to 
secure one by asking the baseball manager for 
one. One thing is sure, if the next posters are 
taken as soon as they are put up, no more will 
be posted, for it will only be a waste of ma- 
terial. 

The Y. M. C A. Building Fund Canvass. 

An effort is now being made to raise eight or 
ten thousand dollars among the friends of the 
College throughout the State. This sum w 
needed to complete the full amount- $110,000. 
Three Topeka papers, the Mail and Breeze, the 
Farmers* Advocate, and the Kama* Farmer, have 
agreed to open their columns for subscriptions. 
These papers will reacli a large number of peo- 
ple, but the mere reading of the pages devoted 
to the canvass will not he sufficient. Every 
student and friend of the Y. M. C. A. building 
movement should see or write to the friends at 
home. The effort is being made to organize 
the different counties into groups which will be 
responsible for the work in their own county. 
In this way the building plan will be adver- 
tised all over the State. Every student is 
urged to push this work along. 



Ag. Association. 

The Association was called to order by M. 
L. Walter. Following installation of the new 
officers, the speech by President Conner was 
one of the features of the session. Mr. Wat- 
kins then read an excellent number of "The 
Rural ist." Professor Walters entertained us 
with some interesting facts about intensive 
farming in Switzerland; and some of the Ag. 
boys are now contemplating making Swiss 
cheese and raising pumpkins on the wood-shed 
roof. The violin musie of Mr. Mather's, fur- 
nished by Miss Lane and Mr. Hand, was en- 
joyed very much. In a heated debate R. W. 
Hull convinced the judges, despite Gernert's 
arguments to the contrary, that more benefit is 
derived by an Ag. student from work in the 
Association than in other literary societies. 
After a short business session we adjourned. 

Washburn next Saturday, 3:45 p.m. 



380 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 




Coming Events. 

Saturday, April 14: Baseball, Washburn; 
Harap.-Io. egg-roast. 

Monday, April 16: Junior-senior reception. 

Tuesday, April 17: Baseball, College of Em- 
poria. 

Thursday, April 19: Seniors will publish 
Herald. 



Chicago Glee Club, April 18. 

Tennis goods at Frost & Davis. 

Wren Thurston spent Sunday in Topeka. 

The seniors will edit the Herald next week. 

Ask Dan Walters how he likes to stop run- 
away horses. 

The Ionian program last Saturday was fur- 
nished by Ex-Ios. 

Frost & Davis will please you along the line 
of sporting goods. 

Pennants in stock and made to order. 50e to 
$1.00 at Knostman's. 

The Dairy Department has received a new 
dynamo of 115 volts. 

Miss Lucy Needham has been out of College 
on account of sickness. 

General Hughes got "his" at the Harap. 
special Saturday evening. 

Roy Fogwell went to Topeka Saturday to 
visit at home over Sunday. 

Miss Thayer enjoyed a visit from her mother 
the latter part of last week. 

Miss Amy Elder was out of College a few 
days on account of sickness. 

The Herald office was swept out one day 
last month. We are duly grateful. 

Mrs. Harry Brown, who has been quite sick 
with pneumonia for some time, is better at this 
writing. 

Janitor Lewis said that the junior colors 
were the best colors on the ground Saturday 
morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Butterfield, '01, of 
Pittsburg, Kan., are the proud parents of a 
little son. 

The Ag. Association correspondent forgot to 
add the words: "for nothing" to his signature 
last week. 

Several ex-College students are conducting 
experiments over the State for the College. 
Among these persons are A- F. Turner, A. L, 
Halstead, R. S. Wilson, and W. R. Moody. 



Misses Maud and Carrie Harris were out of 
College last week on account of the death of 
their grandmother. 

Baseball rooters, attention! We have, big 
assortment of pennants now at 50c, 75c and 

$1.00 at Knostman's. 

The Fraternity Club gave another one of 
their series of dances at Commercial Club Hall 
last Monday evening. 

The Board of Regents and Faculty members 
were given a reception by President and Mrs. 
Nichols last Friday evening. 

Percy Lill will be the junior "devil." Bertha 
Helen Wilber and his sideburns will have the 
same position on the sophomore staff. 

Miss Ethel McKean was initiated into the 
Witches last Saturday evening. Miss Louise 
Fielding also entered the sorority recently. 

Raymond and Anna Harrison were called 
home Wednesday on account of the death of 
their grandmother, Mrs. Wm. Gaston, of 
Jewell, Kan. 

Archie Huycke has resigned his position as 
private secretary to the President He left last 
week for Hot Springs, Ark., where he will take 
medical treatment. 

Miss Mary Davis will take the place vacated 
by Miss Huntress. Miss Margaret Butterfield 
will return and take the position of bookkeeper 
in the Secretary's office. 

The Domestic Science Department is figuring 
out a balanced ration for the track team aspir- 
ants. All the boys will be required to follow 
this as closely as possible. 

The janitor boys ought to give the juniors a 
bonus for placing such a good chance before 
them of making a few extra dimes. Pulling 
colors out of trees is easy work. 

Mrs. Edith (Perkins) Myers, '00, visited with 
Mrs. S. J. Pratt and renewed old acquaint- 
ances a few days last week. She was on her 
way from Virginia to California. 

The Lincoln Western League baseball team 
defeated the Nebraska University team last 
week by the score of 2-1. One error and a 
total of eleven hits was made in the game. 

J. H. Payne returned from Topeka Sunday 
and will be in College this term. He is carry- 
ing his arm in a sling, having had it reset 
where it was broken in football practice last 
fall. 

The prospects for the track team are very 
bright. About twenty-five good candidates are 
out working. Coach Melick wants some more 
boys to work for the broad jump and the 
hurdles. 

The Dairy Department have two hundred milk 
bottles distributed over the town and among 
the students. A reward of 50 cents will be 
given to the person bringing the most bottles 
this week. 

The Girls' Rooters' Club met after chapel 
last Friday and elected the following officers: 
President, Boline Hanson ; vice-president, 
Margaret Cunningham; secretary and treas- 
urer, Grace Hawkins; leader, Catherine Ward. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



381 



NEW CLOTHING 



■ter JOHN COONS, of Course 



NEW SHOES J 

NEW HATS 



NEW GOODS arriving daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: :; :: :: :: 



I 



Walk*Ove* 
Shoes 



J 



Get your tennis rackets at Frost ft Davis. 

Chas. Hull visited Walter Taylor last Sun- 
day. 

Janitor Lewis cleaned out his office last 
Monday. 

Everything in the sporting goods line at 
Frost & Davis. 

Pennants in stock and made to order, 50c and 
$1.00 at Knostman's. 

E. H. Taft had the pleasure of a visit from 
his father last Friday. 

Assistants Watkins and Seaton went to hear 
the Messiah at Lindsborg last Sunday. 

' The best advice that can be given to the 
seniors is to keep their "gates" closed. 

Mrs. Kinzer is confined to her bed with an 
injured knee. The injury is quite serious. 

Baseball rooters, attention ! We have big 
assortment of pennants now at 50c, 75c and 
$1.00 at Knostman's. 

Professor Dickens made a short trip to Hays 
Experiment Station last week. He reports 
everything doing nicely. 

A pig-feeding experiment has been started in 
the Animal Husbandry Department. Five lots 
of twenty hogs each will be used. 

The Chicago Glee Club is one of the most 
popular quartets in America. Hear them at 
the College Auditorium next Wednesday eve- 
ning. Program will begin promptly at 7:45. 



The Regents did not have any very impor- 
tant business at their recent meeting. The con- 
tract for the new smoke-stack was let to Ben- 
net, of Topeka. 

Only two more numbers of the College lecture 
course. The next one is the Chicago Glee Club, 
a male quartet of the very best. The slide 
trombone quartet is a special feature. Don't 
fail to hear them. Program begins promptly 
at 7:45. 

Prof. O. Erf has again been called away on 
an institute trip, this time in the vicinity of 
Abilene. The boys taking special dairy work 
are complaining, and justly demanding a new 
system of rules in regard to the calling away 
of the instructors. 

Miss M. A. Livermore, a graduate of North- 
western University and for the past seven 
years a missionary to India, has been secured 
to speak to the students concerning her experi- 
ence among the women of India. This meeting 
will be held Thursday afternoon at 3:45 in 
south society hall. 

Last Saturday morning those persons coming 
to College early noticed that the trees and the 
sides of the buildings were decorated with 
strips of red and white bunting and that Mr. 
Lewis and some of his faithful helpers were 
busy pulling them down. All kinds of expla- 
nations were given as to how the colors were 
placed on the trees. Mr. Lewis said that some 
of the juniors must have roosted kind of high, 
went to sleep and fell out of the trees, leaving 
a piece of their red vests as "momentums. " 



WE WILL GIVE AWAY FREE 



A Magnificant Trophy Cup 

To the member of the K. S. A. C. baseball team who has the highest batting average. 
We carry the most complete line of Baseball and Tennis Goods in the city and invite 
comparison. OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT. 

ANDERSON'S BOOKSTORE 



-*-r 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



irt rnur^iMO FlAAI/CTAnC Headquarters for College Text-Books 
V AKIN t I 5 DUUlto I UKC and College Supplies of all Kinds 

Keuffel & Esser Line of Drawing Material 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

University Perfection Separate- Leaf Note-Books 
Eastman's Kodaks and Camera Supplies 
College Souvenir Postal Cards 

K. S. A. C. Writing Tablets 
Spalding's Line of Baseball Goods 



Prices Guaranteed as low a* the lowest 



31 1 Poyntz Avenue 



; 



- ' 



The good old summer-time seems to be almost 
here. 

The hoys at the Park Place cleaned house 
last Monday. 

J. W. F. Hughes, of Topeka, visited his 
son, Monday and Tuesday. 

Very few of the students went to Lindsborg 
Sunday to hear the ° Messiah." 

A race track one- fifth of a mile in length was 
laid out around Athletic Park, Monday. 

Dexter Hoi loway and Pat Brown were "match- 
in" dollars the other night, right out in the mid- 
dle of the road. 

Don't forget. Track team practice every 
afternoon in the City Park. Come out and see 
what you can do. 

Captain Shaffer showed Col. Wilder S. Met- 
ealf and Maj. Geo. H. Morgan around College 
Monday afternoon. 

H, C. Turner, '01, is back in College and 
will spend this term taking advanced work. 
His profession is teaching. 

Miss Livermore. a returned missionary, will 
give an address this afternoon in the south so- 
ciety hall at three forty-five. All are invited. 

Did you get one of the Athletic Association 
score-books yesterday? A new set will he 
issued for each game. They will cost five cents 
each. 

Has any one heard how the freshman basket- 
ball team came out on their recent trip? We 
would willingly print the score if we could find 
out what it was. 

Claude Cunningham, who has been taking ad- 
vanced work in agriculture at Cornell, returned 
from there last week and will apply his knowl- 
edge in running a farm on College Hill this 
summer. 

Lust week must have marked the anniversary 
of some event in the history of the class of '99, 
as at least three distinct 99' s appeared on the 
smoke-stack. A great many persons noticed 
this phenomenon. 

The following is the schedule for the coming 
track meets : Washburn at Manhattan, May 12 ; 
Intercollegiate at Topeka, third week in May; 
K. S. N. at Emporia, May 25; C. of E. at 
Emporia, May 2b, 



Have you tried to turn your grand-stand 
tickets back to the association? If you haven't, 
you are behind a good many students as well 
as several Faculty memhers. Funny isin't it, 
how hard it is for some people to help a good 
thing along? 

The Y. M. C. A. cabinet for the coming year 
is: President, A. D. Hoi loway; 1st viee-presi- 
cent, C. E. Whipple; 2nd vice-president, J. E. 
Brock; secretary, R. W. Hull. Chairmen of 
committees: Finance, J. R. Garver; Bible 
study, E. C. Farrar; new student, A. G. Phil- 
ips; missionary, W. B. Gernet; membership, 
H. A. Coldwell; religeous meetings, H. H. Con 
well; social, A. G. Kittel: employment, H. A. 
Praeger; furnishing, V. E. Berkey. 




Copyright 1906 
B. Kupperthelmer &. Co 

Chicago 



THE GOOD 

Clothes 

STORE 



SEE OUR NEW 

Rain Coats 
Top Coats 
Suits 

Shirts and 
Hats 

The man who does 
not know what he wants 
for his Spring Suit can 
put in a very pleasant 
half-hour in finding it 

at 



E L Knostman s 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



^— 



383 



S.h 



2&~ 
1 Book* 



Spectacles 
Gold Pens 



R. E. LOFINCK | 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

i 1 * Mi ical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, Notions and 
Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



K. S. A. C. Directory. 

HAMILTON SOCIETY. 

President C. E. Davis 

Vice-president A. D. Holloway 

Secretary C. G. Nevins 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in north society 
nail. 

WEBSTEB SOCIETY. 

President W, A. Conner 

Vice-president F. W. Caldwell 

Secretary J. E. Brock 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock In south society 
hall. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY. 

President E, W. Matherly 

Vice-president. Anna Tolin 

Secretary Walter Zahnly 

Meets in south society ball at 2:00 p. h. 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY. 

President E. £.. Shattuck 

Vice-president Almira Kerr 

Secretary 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 7:30 p. h. 

IONIAN SOCIETY. 

President Alma McRae 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Blanche Robertson 

Meets in north society hall Saturday at 2:45 p. m. 

EtTHODBLPHIAN SOCIETY. 

President Gabriella Venard 

Vice-president Marie Coons 

Secretary Adah Lewis 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 2:45 p. m. 

. Y. M. c. A. 

President A. D. Holloway 

Vice-president.. C. E. Whipple 

Secretary R. W. Hull 

General Secretary W. W. McLean 

Sunday afternoon meetings in Association parlors, at 
3:30. 

President Flora Hull 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Ella V. Brooks 

General Secretary Miss Thayer 

Weekly meeting during noon hour each Saturday In 
south society hall. The Hume, 617 Manhattan Ave. 

ENGINEERS' ASSOCIATION. 

President J. L. Dow 

Vice-president Smith Faris 

Secretary W. W. Carlson 

Meets Saturday evening in C 60 at 7:30. 

AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION. 

President W. A. Conner 

Vice-president W. E. Watkins 

Secretary W. B. Gernert 

Meets Saturday at 2:30 in Ag. Hall. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

President E. L. Adams 

Vice-president A. D, Hollowav 

Secretary C. E. Whipple 

General Manager Prof. G. A. Dean 

Meets at call of the president. 

GIRLS' ROOTERS' CLUB, 

President Boline Hanson 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Grace Hawkins 

Leader Catherine Ward 

BOYS' HOOTERS' CLUB. 

Chairman A. D, Holloway 

Vice-chairman J. R. Coxen 

Secretary B. H. Wilber 

Treasurer J- E, Brock 

Meets at the call of the chairman. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. G HOSTRUP, Prop, 

5E^Z R< V, Dyer 

Fop Sheet Music, Pianos, Pictures, 
Wall-paper, and Paint 

West Room, Union National Bank Building 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS- We 

offer you only the best. X X 

W, M. STTNGLEY & CO. 



GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six hatbs for one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors boned. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 

113 Poyntz Ave., - Phone 53. 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Hank Building: . . 

Porcelain bm th tubs tine line clgmrs and toilet articles 



' ■ ' '■' 



I 



* 

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i 






car 



384 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



r: 



I 



I 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

.•Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



JUL 



Phone 167 



All Kinds of 




Ice C 



ream 



Easter candies 
and novelties 



TW 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 






^•\l1nfaln• Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink line. Finest 
OUniain. ICE CREAM SODAS 



U 



Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



<& 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. <J If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring.'' Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
<I Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest, fl Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 
1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 
B and 11 Drumm Street. 



General Offices; 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 YcravtHe Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 




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rp 



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Our Young Men's Suits 

WE TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Clothes for the Young Man from 16 to 20 years of 'age. Xhsr smts 
have the desired amount of style in cut and make-up, while the fabrics 
are the most appropriate. We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we have made ready for them 

You'll Find Our Suits Different 

They are $10.00, $12.50, $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 and $22.00. 



W. S. ELLIOT 



312 

POYNTZ 

AVE. 




&%%! 



l-jt 



4. t- i. 



20 per cent off 

on everything in our store 

On every $1.00 purchase and over, up 
to and including April 10, 1906 



We carry a big line of 
pasteries, photo supplies, house furnish- 
ings, ladles' & men's furnishings & other useful articles 



AT THE 



Big Racket 



T> 



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mam 



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^Chc Students' Herald 






Published by the Student* 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 








SENIOR NUMBER, 






•^^■^^■■■■p 






. - 







DAIRY SWEEPSTAKES X CREAMERY SWEEPSTAKES 



I 

I 



OHIO 
Grand Sweepstakes 

Dairy Sweepstakes 
Creamery Sweepstakes 

at the Ohio State Dairymen's 
Convention held at Dayton, Jan- 
uary 24-26. Creamery score, 9?i; 
Jarm dairy, VI. 

X 

WISCONSIN 
Grand Sweepstakes 

at the Wisconsin State Dairy- 
men's Convention at Waultesha, 
Jan. 80 to Feb. %. Score, OTi. 




CONNECTICUT 
Grand Sweepstakes 

at the Connecticut State Dairy- 
men's Convention at Hartford. 
January 17-18. Score 98. 



MAINE 
Dairy Sweepstakes 

at the Maine State Dairymen's 
Convention at Pittsftald, De- 
cember 5-7. Score 97]. 



The United States Separator Holds World's Record tor Closest Separation of cream, and above is 
another of the many lists of victories which show that The United States Separator Delivers the Cream 
In Smoothest and Best Condition to make the finest quality of butter. Free CaUAooue on application. 

VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., * *» Bellows Falls, Vt 

dOHTCBN DISTRIBUTING wtKIHOUIN THROUQHOUT TMK UNITED aTATM «NO CANADA 



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Best Soda Water 



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FOR 

Icecream and 
Icecream sodas 



GOTO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Disc Cultivators, Safety 
Com Harvesters, little Wonder Chums, Perfection 
Lawn Swings, Oak Stoves, Sash Weights, Chimney Caps, 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs, Structural Iron Work, Store Re- 
pairs, etc. :: :: :: " « :: :: « " 



I 

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Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted ft 

Heated Busses 

* Hacks 



MANHATTAN, 



KANSAS 



J.Q.A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 




Day and night 

Meet all trains day or night, 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for ball 
games, etc. Let us call 
your attention to oar up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty, :: :: :: :: :: :: 






PHONE 65 

H. J. BmhWK L. *. PWIIIpt 



N 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



THE 



Students' Co-oper ative Bookstore 

Can furnish you with your College supplies. KEUFFEL & 
ESSER Drawing Instruments, EUGENE DIETZGEN Drawing 
Material, WATERMAN'S IDEAL Fountain Pens. V y 

Up-to-date Stationery. Special orders receive prompt attention. 



SEEDS GROW **' ^' Higinbotham 



Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo. T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 113^15 N. Second St. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



Orr 



$ STUDIO is the place to ge t 

O PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. 



• * • • 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KING'S 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Subscribe for 



THE HERALD 



$1 per year. 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired, 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 



Ask the Seniors if we 

make them any 

pictures 




Wolf's Studio 



MM 



1 



386 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



TT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry-Goods 

We carry a complete line 
of wool dress-goods, silks- 
wash goods, hosiery, under- 
wear and notions. Grey is 
very stylish this season. 
Among the dress-goods we 
have a grey suiting 46 inches 
wide for $1. grey mohair 36 
inches wide for 50 cents, 
fancy grey mohair 36 inches 
wide for 50 cents, grey serge 
40 inches wide for 60 cents, 
grey voile 36 Inches wide for 
50 cents. 




Buy 

Krippendorf-Dittmann Co.'s Ladies' 
Shoes. Tbey are the best you can buy. 

Ladies' Gymnasium Slippers $1 * 1.35 



Ladles' Ready-to-wear 

Garments 

We have just in another 
lot of silk coats. These are 
in the newest styles includ- 
ing the full length, three- 
quarter lengths and Etons. 
Colors black and tan. These 
are very pretty coats 
and range in price from 
$4.75 to $16. We also have a 
nobby lot of walking skirts 
in greys, shadow plaids, and 
fancy mixtures which we 
would like to show you. 
McCall patterns, 10 and 15c. 
none higher. 



"Everything in HARD- 
WARE, Best Groceries at 
lowest prices. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry- Goods, Keady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



GET BUSY 




Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Kirks vllle. Mo., 
and late of the Treating Staffer that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free of charge. ;: :: :: :: :: " 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office. 134-2 

Bank Btdg.. Booms 15-20. Res., 134-3 



PROFESSIONA U 



DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should he convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



But don't work and worry yourself to 
death to find style and eomfort in 
SHOES, but go direct to 

THE LEADER 

They carry a complete line of Dry -Goods and 
Furnishings at lowest cash price. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res, Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Gave. 



Office in Union Natl. 
BankBldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room 16. Union National Bank Building 



The Students' Herald 






SENIOR NUMBER 



motto: "in union There is strength. 



Volume XI. 



J 



Manhattan, Kan., April 19, 1906. 



Number 30 



Clippings from the Letters of a Country 
School ma* am. 

After a week of labor in the schoolroom, 
this has been a happy day of leisure for me. 
And never l>efore, I believe, have I been so 
thankful for rest. 

• ■ 

Just at present my work goes nicely and my 
spirit is high. There has been quite an addi- 
tion to my school in the person of several 
young gentlemen between the ages of sixteen 
and twenty. They are of the typical country 
type, tall, tanned, and ungainly. Sometimes, 
when I stand baside one of them to guide him 
safely through the intricacies of his grammar 
lesson, I feel my face glow, overspread with a 
crimson which equals that of the neckties pur- 
chased for the sole purpose of appearing before 
the new sehoolma'am. 

I am just a little homesick and discouraged. 
Inelastic district school: did you say? Had 
you searched all through this great language 
of ours you could not have found a better ad- 
jective for the place. As I stood before that 
room of * 'young hopefuls." "Inelastic" in 
burnished letters seemed to form a sort of 
hellish halo round about the scene. No, I have 
never, I can proudly say, failed in anything 
that I have undertaken, and I will sueceed in a 
way in district school-teaching; but I will not 
finish in the way I began. 

I stood this evening in the "dingy little 
schoolhouse" door, while the long irregular 
line of figures, shouting and laughing, infi- 
nitely happy in their wonted joy of "school's 
let out," wound slowly down to the cross- 
roads, and then, after knotting in grotesque 
little groups to discuss my justice or injustice 
in deciding the various difficulties of the day 
and to praise or condemn one another for 
deeds well done or well undone, broke up and 
finally tagged themselves out of sight and 
hearing down the long, silent, country roads. 
But I could not share their happiness. To 
hold the bubbling spirits of forty young imps 



down to anything like a sense of work and 
duty on a day when the very erispness of the 
air and the wild myriads of fairy snowfiakes 
dancing and whirling about the windows, in- 
vite, yes, even challenge them to come out, is 
no easy task, and I was tired, utterly wearied. 
Nor was that all. For me the day had been 
one of those when effort seems vain; when 
hope seeks some retreat, far removed, and 
hides away ; when the guiding light rays of life 
grow fainter and fainter and leave one in all 
but utter darkness. My very soul was smoth- 
ered with a sad, vague longing for— what? I 
did not know myself. A change, something 
better than my lot. 



It is all over at last! The last day has 
dawned and died; the last good-bye has been 
said ; the last task is beautiful in its completion. 
One more page of my life history is completed, 
and another, all white, lies before me. 

He used to call his girl "Revenge." 

Cognomen rather neat ; 
When asked the reason why he said. 

You know revenge is sweet." 



The Music Recital. 

The weather, it seems, does not see fit to 
favor the Music Department with ideal condi- 
tions of the atmospheric elements. A fair 
number, however, braved the storm and mud 
and gained refuge in the Auditorium, Thursday 
evening, to hear the student recital. 

The entire program was excellent, and many 
who stayed at home because there was no 
admission charged made a sad mistake. Why 
can't there be talent at K. S. A. C. as well as 
any other place? 

The selection by the orchestra was excep- 
tionally good. We enjoy something out of the 
ordinary, and this was doubly appreciated in 
so much as we understood the story of it. 

Both Miss Harold's and Miss Nicolet's piano 
solos proved to us the old saying that practice 
makes perfect. Mr. Roberts gave a double 
number, which was "marvelously beautiful." 
The last number on the program, by Misses 
Nicolet, Brown and Jones, was another extra- 



888 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



ordinary number in which the girls did very 
well indeed. 

This program shows what might he done at 
K. S. A, C. in the line of music. Our Choral 
Union concerts have attracted a great deal of 
attention, and we are rapidly improving, not 
only in this, hut in all the hranches of music. 
For many of those appearing on the'programs 
at these recitals it is their first appearance be- 
hind the foot lights, and nothing can be of more 
benefit to them in this line than becoming ac- 
customed to such experiences. 

It was a noticeable fact that the name of no 
sedate senior appeared on the program of 
Thursday evening, but this is easily explained; 
First, although there are undoubtedly none 
who could not have rendered a selection that 
would have done credit to the Music Depart- 
ment, yet there are too many cares in their 
strenuous lives for the majority to snatch the 
time to favor the public with their talent. 
Secondly, there are others who are by far too 
gifted to think of expending their energy on a 
musical program without ample remuneration, 
as befits their accomplishments. 

These concerts are to be given each month, 
and the weather and papa permitting, we hope 
they will be well attended. 



Interclass Track Meet, April 30. 

The interclass track meet will be held Mon- 
day, April 30, at the Athletic Park. At this 
writing a large road grader is at work on the 
one-fifth-mile track around the field. The run- 
ners will begin practice on the new track at 
once so that they may become accustomed to 
this style of track. The interest shown in track 
athletics is better than last year but still lacks 
the enthusiasm needed to bring out fully the 
latent talent of the College. Some classes have 
as yet hardly any men out, while there is too 
much of a tendency to concede an event to the 
first men to try for it. It is now only a little 
more than a week until the class meet and men 
who expect to try for the College team or to 
score for their class must get out immediately. 

Nebraska 10, K. S. A. £ 0. 

"Into each life some rain must fall— some 
days roust be dark and dreary." and so it 
seemed that April 11 was the one dark day of 
the season for the baseball team. Neverthe- 
less, every cloud has a silver lining, and un- 
doubtedly our clouds will be turned wrong side 
out for the remainder of the season. 

In the first inning our boys seemed to be 
somewhat "narvous," and Nebraska succeeded 
in making four scores. Then our boys settled 
down to work and did much better. In the 



sixth inning Nebraska shot a ball over the 
fence- a sad accident which brought in three 
more scores. 

Our boys made a number of errors, but a 
good many excellent plays were also made. 
"Choppy" leads in the batting record: his pitch- 
ing was good as well as his batting. 

The score: 

NEBRASKA. AB R H 8H PO A B 

Gaddis.cf 4 2 1 1 

[tine, 2b •■ f 1 J A * 2 

Barta.lb 4 1 1 1 12 

Carr. c r > 1 1 § » < v J 

Denslow.ss t t 1 f I I . • 

Carrot 8b * * 1 f | • ° 

Morse.lf j 1 2 2 

Bellamy, rf * § " ° 

Wilson, p I »» « 

Totals 3H it' 8 2 



2 
1 



o 



4 1 

11 1 



K. A. A. C. 

H. StTontr. 3b. If. 
Cunningham, ss. 
Porter, cf . rf — 
Al. Strontr, If. cf 
Mallon. 2b, 3b.... 
Haynes, tb — .. 

Miller, c 

Cave, 2b 

Davis, rf 

Cold well. |i 



Alt 

l 

4 

3 

3 

I 

. . 4 

;i 

l 

".V.V.V.V.V" a 

totals". SO 

Summary: Struck out— by 
Nillson 5; base on balls by 
N ill son :t; earned runs— N el 
runs— Morse 1: double play 
ningham to Haynes. Cmpire, 



11 H SH Po A 











I) 
i) 

n 















11 


II 

1 

I II 
■i I) 



(I 




12 




1 

I 
1 
(I 



I 

n 
(t 




2 





4 

1 
(1 

3 

it 
I 



:i 

4 




1 

1 

1 





1 



11 11 II 



Col dwell 7; by 

Coldwell 2, by 

>raska 1: home 

-Mallon to Cun- 

Van Antwerp. 



K. S, A. C. 8, Washburn L 

Rejoice and be glad and give vent to your 
jubilant spirits, for victory is ours. Washburn 
can't crow over us now.. The Washburn lierieir, 
in speaking of their trip, stated that they would 
stop in and see what the farmers could do. 
Do you suppose they discovered what our 
abilities are along the line of baseball? We 
outplayed them from the start, our hoys 
making only one error during the entire game. 
Washburn was strong in the outfield, but the 
infield was very poor. The pitcher tried to 
frighten us by hitting Strong, the tirst man up, 
with the ball. Our boys were brave, however, 
and it didn't disturb us in* the least. 

Kahl on third took in everything that came 
his way. Cave on second made a number of 
star plays. Short v Haines on first reached 
everything within a radius of twenty feet, with 
one foot on the base. The field work was be- 
yond improvement. At this rate we will win 
everything this spring. Mallon, in the box, 
was the star player of the game. Hiegle struck 
out the same number of men as Mallon, but 
Carl fielded his position in grand style as well 
as holding Washburn down to only three safe 
hits. These were made, two in the fifth by 
Smiley and McCampbell. and one in the ninth 
by Stahl. 



m 



TEE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



389 



In the first inning, the crowd hecarae wildly 
excited. Strong scored, Sol. made a two- base 
hit, Mallon got to third on a passed hall, and 
we succeeded in making three scores. Pp to 
the fifth inning Washburn did not succeed in 
getting a man past first. In the fourth inning 
Shorty got a safe hit. There were four scores 
made: by Kahl, Haines. Cave and Miller. 

Undoubtedly, our score would have heen 
lower had the Washburn ca teller seen fit to 
have looked heavenward occasionally to catch 
a few easy little fouls. Although his name is 
Miller, we ure sure that he is not even a distant 
relative of our Miller. 

In the fifth inning Washburn obtained their 
one score, and it was not an earned run. Kahl 
hrought in another score in this inning. No' 
more scores were made after the fifth. Our hoys 
made a number of quick plays and kept Wash- 
burn busy. The ninth inning saw a Washburn 
man on third, but fate was against him and he 
didn't get home. 

The game was well attended. It is estimated 
that there were about nine hundred p resent. 
Quigley was the umpire. We always like to 
have '-John D. Rockefeller" umpire our games, 
as he keeps the game going without any waste 
of time. His derisions are fair and undisputed. 

It is hoped that we may have as good success 
in the future games as we had in this, both in 
playing and in attendance. 

The score: 

Wash hit kn. ab h h sh po a k 

MttCampbeH. 3b 1 I 1 8 

White, ss 3 19 1 

Miller, c 3 i 

Stuhl. cf I 10 2 1 

Markham. 2b \ o o o o o o 

Johnson lb 4 1 11 1 

Taylor, rf 3 o o o o o o 

Smiley. If (010801 

Rieifle. i> 2 2 

Totals 31 1 3 24 12 1 

K. S. A. C. AB k h SH PO a E 

H. Strontr. If 4 110 10 

1'nnninchiiin, ss 5 12 10 

Porter, rf 2 1 1 1 00 

Al. Strontr. ef 5 1 

Mallon. p 4 2 3 5 

Kahl. 3b 2 2 5 

Havnes. Hi 4 1 J 14 1 

Miller, e 4 10 5 10 

Cave. 2b i 1 S 2 1 

Totals 84 H 7 1 27 15 1 

By innings: 

Washburn ...0— o— 0— 0— 1— 0-0 -0—0=1 

K. S. A. CI.... 3— 0— O— 4— 1— 0-0— 0— *=K 

Struck out— by Hiegle 4. by Mallon 4: hases 
on balls — by Riegle 3. by Mallon 2: hit by 
pitched ball- -by Riegle 2. by Mallon 2. Um- 
pire, Quigley. 

Hamittons. 

A visitor at the Ha raps, would l>e surprised 
to learn that the participants had not the usual 
time for preparation. "The best laid plans of 



Hamps. and los. gang aft aglae," and as a re- 
sult our program was an impromptu one, with 
only a day's pre pa ration allowed. May we be 
allowed to say, good work on short notice is a 
characteristic of the Hamps., so perhaps the 
visitor, after learning of the short preparation, 
will not be surprised after all. President Davis 
called the society to order just like he had 
been used to it. Holloway led in devotion, 
after which wo installed two officers and ini- 
tiated three new members. The program began 
with America and an encore by the society. 
Next M. L. Parsons argued that *'A large 
army and navy lessen the probabilities of 
war." Then ('. C, Long made a stump speech 
{so called by Hastings) for the negative. Law- 
son, for a change, introduced Miss Kdna Jones; 
who rendered a piano solo which was appre- 
ciated so much she gave another. B. G. 
Srhafer revived the debate, then we interrupted 
it again with a solo by Parrar, who whistled 
an encore. To return to the debate, Percy Lill 
surprised us with a splendid speech for the 
negative. Pred Williams began a speech and 
ended by giving us a rare reading, one which 
he never saw in print. With his effervescent 
wit, Jim Cheney entertained us with a speech, 
"What Might Have Heen." It related to the 
Hamp.-Io. e^ roast, principally. Hastings 
criticized in an interesting and original man- 
ner. After recess, W- A. Hendershot, '04, 
talked, then we all talked some and adjourned. 
Immediately after adjournment the Hamps. and 
Webs, united in a mass meeting, the results of 
which wove published in the KcMtOS City iStar* 
J. E. M. 

A Student Volunteer Band. 

There is probably a large number of people 
who are not aware that a Student Volunteer 
Band has lately been added to the list of stu- 
dent organizations. 

At present there are only seven members, 
whose intention, if God permits, is to go as 
foreign missionaries and carry the Good News 
to the foreign field. The object of this Hand is 
to strengthen the individual members in their 
declaration and help them prepare for their 
life work. The Band will also try to place the 
cause of missions more prominently l>efore 
their fellow students. 

At present, the Volunteer Band meets Hun- 
day afternoon at 5:16 at the Y. W. C. A. 
Home. S. c. 

Hewitt— That fellow saved ine from bank- 
ruptcy. 
Jewett -How was that? 
Hewitt— He married the girl t was engaged to. 



B90 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



The Students' Herald 



SPECIAL SENIOR NUMBER 



—MOTTO: "In Union There is Strength. "- 



Entered at the post-omce at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, live cents. 

SENIOR STAFF. 

Makcia Turner Editor-in-chief 

L. R. Elder Business Manager 

M. M. Hastings Literary Editor 

Wrenn Thurston Local Editor 

Mattie Pittman f, Associate Local Editors 

W. E. WATKINS ( 

WINIFRED Dalton Exchange EAitor 

Elizabeth Sweet Alumni Editor 

Lau ba Lyman Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To Insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Apr. 19, 1906 


i 




a: editorials 


js 





In the first place, the senior class is grateful 
to the Herald people for giving into our 
amateur hands the lines and letting us drive 
the big concern for a week. At first we were 
content merely to stand outside the door of the 
Herald office and look in. Then we ventured 
inside and tiptoed carefully about until we fin- 
ally overcame our feeling of awe. And now 
we wear our hats in the office, whistle if we 
chotfse, or sit upon the table with all the bra- 
vado of the regular Herald staff. We wish 
to say, not as apology, but as an explanation, 
that we are devoting most of our literary en- 
ergy these days to our class book, and that be- 
cause of this fact we are not attempting any- 
thing elaborate in the way of material for this 
issue. 

In taking up the work of the Herald, we re- 
alize that its mission has always heen, primarily, 
to supply College news. Therefore the general 
tone of the paper will be much the same as 
usual, except that our politics are strictly 
middle-of-the-road senior. 



After the inspiring speeches made by Pro- 
fessor Remiek and Coach Ahearn in chapel last 
Wednesday morning, on the subject of baseball 
and our duty to the team, and after the applause 
which followed, it would have l>een reasonable 
to expect at least an ordinary amount of enthu- 
siasm at the game with Nebraska that after- 
noon. We have no fault to find with the size 
of the crowd— we were all there. The east 
bleacher was crowded to its utmost capacity 
with dormant lung power which might have 
been expended in raising the echoes and in- 
cidentally the spirits of our team:- Instead, 
with the exception of a few feeble cheers, the 
atmosphere throughout the game was as 
tranquil as a summer day. Probably we have 
no right to say that the result of the game 
would have been different had our team re- 
ceived more encouragement, but it is an old, 
old fact which needs no repeating that wo work 
far better when we are cheered on by our friends 
than when they stand by and let us fight it out 
alone. We have a team which merits our 
support in every way. Therefore, will the 
Rooters' Club please wake up? 



One lire burns out another's burning 
One pain Is lessened by another's anguish. 

—8hatet*pettr0, 



Last spring term the question of seating the 
students in chapel by classes was agitated con- 
siderably by the different classes, and to prove 
the excellence of the plan it was often put into 
practice, almost every class member being 
present at such times. We have a distinct 
remembrance of the morning during last fall 
term when the Y. W. delegates were present at 
chapel exercises, and when every seat was full. 
Class yells and greetings rang back and forth 
from side to side and from student to Faculty. 
Every face was smiling and every one seemed 
glad to be alive. The visitors later remarked 
the good fellowship and friendly rivalry be- 
tween classes and the respect which the students 
showed to the time and occasion, for when the 
bell rang and the hymn was announced a hush 
fell over the entire hall. We have a distinct 
remembrance of the hour, and we believe it one 
in which the start for the day was made aright. 
Now, the way was kindly laid plain at the 
beginning of last term for a continuance of 
such friendly relation and pleasant associa- 
tions, but now the students have no desire, 
individually or as classes, to contribute their 
little iota to making the morning exercises 
pleasant and profitable to all. During this 
last term the classes might do much toward 
becoming thoroughly acquainted and in firmly 
binding their friendships by attending chapel 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



391 



en mam and occupying their appointed places. 
The jibes and jokes will not be out of place if 
reserved for the proper time, and they will do 
much to make eyes shine and to develop that 
give-and-take quality so necessary in one of 
the world. 



Midsummer Night* s Dream. 

Who says the boys of K. S. A. C. have no 
college spirit and do not rejoice when a base- 
ball game is won. Down Poyntz Avenue they 
came, Saturday night, arrayed in nocturnal 
apparel, headed by a few select members of the 
College band. What could be more inspiring 
to our boys on the team? Will they not try all 
the harder now, since the evidence of such loyal 
support from the boys of K. S. A. CV 

Washburn was undoubtedly proud of the priv- 
ilege to look upon such a gathering arrayed 
in immaculate white. Captain White gave a 
few words, and among other remarks compli- 
mented us on our college spirit and expressed 
a wish that Washburn had more of the same. 
If this is what aids our boys in winning, we do 
want to keep it up. Quigley also appeared be- 
fore the aggregation. He said that college 
spirit like ours makes athletic teams and 
teams make a college. The event of Novem- 
ber '.I seemed to still rankle in his manly bosom, 
but that is past and gone. We are sorry for 
his sake, but very happy for our own. He ex- 
pressed a sincere hope for more congenial ath- 
letic relations in the future between St. Mary's 
and K. S. A. C. 

After failing to rouse Mike's enthusiasm and 
taking Kiene as a substitute, the white-robed 
saints departed. Let us endeavor to give the 
boys our loyal support and, in continuing the 
gentlemanly conduct which has been evidenced 
this spring, show what the students at K. S, 
A. C. can do. 

Junior-Senior Reception. 

On Monday evening Kedzie Hall hatched out 
in the colors of the '06 class. Everywhere were 
tiny yellow chickens on a background of yellow 
and white. In one corner yellow punch and *0H 
banners were served under an arch of yellow 
and white to the tired and thirsty ones. In an- 
other room were served punch of reddish hue 
and '07 stockings. 

After matching Easter eggs and wandering 
aimlessly about in twos in fruitless search for 
chairs, we were quieted by Joe, and then came 
the most exciting event of the evening — an egg 
race. Miss Murphy and Mr. Sanneman entered 
and were cheered on to the last by the on- 
lookers. Miss Murphy was in the lead until 
nearly the close, when Mr. Sanneman, by a 



superhuman effort, managed to get ahead and 
so carried off the prize— a stuffed rabbit. The 
loser was consoled by a little white rabbit. It 
is fortunate that the eggs were china or there 
might have occurred some sad accidents in the 
mad rush for the goal. The next diversion 
was in the form of chewing gum, and the speci- 
mens of rabbits and chickens we made out of 
that gum would have caused the Zoological 
Department to rejoice in the discovery of such 
numerous, unknown species. 

Laura Lyman's chicken, according to G ro- 
ver's wise and just judgment, came nearest 
to nature's own, and she is the proud possessor 
of a jack-in-the-box. 

The class prophecies, by Mr. Nevins and 
Miss Train, afforded u-? much enjoyment. 
The originality indicated the possibilities of 
some juniors and seniors. 

The toasts were given by Mr. Jorgenson, of 
the '07 class, and Mr. Birch, of the 'Ofj's. 
Ruth Neiman presented the shepherd's crook, 
received by Ethel Merry. The seniors sincerely 
hope that, although the juniors now have a 
crook in their class, they will for the most part 
walk in the straight and narrow path; 

Refreshments were served in two courses. 
The first course, chicken pie, was very beauti- 
ful to look upon, but probably would not 
answer the D. S. requirements as to calorie 
value and nutritive ratio. The second course 
was ice-cream on the half-shell, and cake. 

If Easter would always bring such a joyous 
occasion we wish that it might come oftener. 
The seniors forgot cares and troubles in the 
few hours and thoroughly enjoyed themselves. 
Although this is probably the last time the two 
will he together as classes, we will not soon 
forget the good times we have had in many 
meetings. 

Ag. Association. 

The grinding began early and proceeded in 
such a way as indicated that a ball game was 
in sight. W. J. Brown read an excellent paper 
on the judging and breeding of beef cattle. 
Another equally instructive number was a 
practical talk by Mr. Yerkes, who told us some 
facts about wind-breaks for Kansas orchards. 

Following the literary program, there ensued 
a general discussion concerning the revision 
of the agricultural course. This ended with the 
appointment of a committee to confer with in- 
structors in the agricultural departments. We 
adjourned in time to see 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (i, 7, 8. 



Teacher : "What are the children of the Czar 
called?" 
Pupil: "Czardines. "— Ex. 



392 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Change. 

When Tillie used to cross mv path. 

A foot or riclintr on n wheel: 
Her i»nssin»r-hv an aftermath. 

A breath of violets, would reveal. 

Hut in her auto, she, to-mVht. 

So fast that it eould not be seen. 
Hushed bv me: and though failed my si*nt. 

1 knew she passed— by xusollne. 



Raymond Brink was on the sick list last 
wet'k. 

Raymond Harrison has again returned to 
College. 

So far this spring, every rain has arrived 
on schedule time. 

The Cueer Cuartet gave a concert atLeonard- 
ville, Thursday night. 

The A. B. Alumni were entertained hy Mrs. 
Willard, Friday evening. 

Emily Smith, 'Ofi, accompanied the body of 
her brother home last week. 

The Hamp.-lo. egg roast was postponed one 
week on account of bad weather. 

"Choppy" will either have to stop making 
safe hits or else change his name. 

Verda Murphy was absent from College one 
day last week on accent nt of sickness. 

The senior electrical engineers are repairing 
the sparker on the "Hort. " gas engine. 

Miss Rose entertained her sister and brother- 
in-law from Toronto, Canada, last week. 

Winifred Dal ton, 'On, was out of College 
Wednesday of last week on account of sickness. 

Just notice that we aren't going to say any- 
thing mean about "Jorgy " in these columns. 

The seniors have elected Chas. Jones track 
manager and W. E. Watkins baseball mana- 
ger. 

One of the senior D. S. girls is very anxious 
to find out "what incandescent lamps are any- 
way." 

Did yon ever notice how well the Faculty turn 
out to' chapel exercises when the Regents are 
in session? 

All seniors in Physics IV are proud of the 
grades they recently made in that subject. 
The highest was 6ft. 

The funeral of F. L. Osborn, of the sopho 
more class, was held Thursday afternoon from 
the Methodist church. 

On Wednesday evening the ladies of the 
Faculty gave a bundle shower for Miss Rupp 
at the home of Mrs. Brink. 



It rained last Thursday. 

The above item was inserted to (111 up space. 
This item is put in for the same reason. 

W. H. Classon, of the St. .loe Business Col- 
lege, came Tuesday to take up the position of 
private secretary to the President. 

H. B. Hubbard writes from Raton, New 
Mex., that he has a good position with the 
motor department of the Santa Fe. 

Russel Porter, who has been sick for some 
time with rheumatism and dropsy, is now well 
enough to be around on crutches. 

Miss Butterfield returned from Washington, 
D. C, last week. She took up her old work in 
the secretary's office, Monday morning. 

It is rumored that the Webs, will take the 
En rodel phi ans out to Eureka Lake. Saturday. 
The Web. feet will boubtless come in handy. 

Miss Daisy Loomis, of Ionia, Kan., a former 
student, visited with friends a few days last 
week. She is now attending school at Emporia. 

The Misses Cole, Frey, Pmberger, and Mes- 
srs. Walker, Nystrom and Elder went boat rid- 
ing Sunday. They report that the fishing is 
fine. 

The College calendar having overtaken the 
baseball season, the literary society reports 
will now lie expressed in the slang of the dia- 
mond. 

The "New Advance" traction engine was un- 
loaded Monday. It is a twenty -six horse- 
power compound engine with a plowing at- 
tachment. 

An agent for the International Correspond- 
ence Schools was around College Saturday 
taking orders for text-books on "Applied 
Electricity. " 

James A. Lupfer, first lieutenant and adju- 
tant, also marshal of the Webster Literary So- 
ciety, has recently moved his belongings from 
H. C. to Moro and Ninth. 

Win, Anderson, of the Physics Department, 
has been granted one year's leave of absence 
by the Regents and will study theoretical elec- 
tricity in one of the eastern universities. 

The senior electrical engineers tried to get a 
monopoly on the periodicals in the reading 
room one day last week. As a result the Li- 
brary "black list" is much longer than it was 
before. 

C. I. Weaver has recently received a hand- 
book of wire tables from the J. Roebling's 
Sons Co. This book contains much useful 
data which may be found in any book on 
engineering. 

The present outlook for the class track meet 
is that the freshmen will be strong in the 
sprints, the juniors in the weights, and the 
seniors in the distance runs. The sophomore 
specialty is still in doubt. 

Miss Stella Ballard, of Washington, Kan., 
returned Friday to take special examinations 
in her last term's studies. Miss Ballard 
dropped out of College before finals on account 
of the death of her brother. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



393 






NEW CLOTHING 



NEW SHOES 
NEW HATS 



Meet our 
Tailor 



NEW GOODS arriving- daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: ;; r: :: :; 

JOHN COONS, of Course 



Walk/Over 
Shoes 



Seven seniors are trying for the College 
track team. 

Some of the track-team aspirants refuse to 
quit eating pie. 

The dairy elective class is making butter 
from sweet cream. 

''Nate" Davis is passing around the treats, 
this week. It's a boy. 

Did you see the night- shirt parade, Saturday 
night? It was "nifty. " 

W. W. Smith was showing visitors about 
College, last Wednesday. 

Prof, Erf returned last Saturday for a short 
visit with his elective dairy class. 

The students who flunked spent Sunday cram- 
ming for the special examination Monday. 

The Rooters' Club gave the Nebraska boys a 
ride over the campus, last Wednesday evening. 

Reverend Thurston preached an Easter ser- 
mon, to the Knight Templars, Sunday after- 
noon. 

E. E. Brown and E, W. Thurston have been 
offered positions by the Western Electric Co., 
of Kansas City. 

Bunn Thurston recently bought a pistol, but 
he says he is not on the war path, for the 
artillery is for Coach Melick. 

Somebody hid Winnie Smith's mail cart in 
the evergreens last Friday. "Mike" rescued 
the outfit and returned it to its old camping 
ground. 



E. A. Wright and R. R. White have been se- 
cured by the Bullock Electric Co., of Cincin- 
nati, to fill good positions after graduation. 

Professor Wheeler is trying to find out 
whether Jimmy Garver "just yawns" in class 
or is wanting to tell what he knows about Feeds 
and Feeding. 

Watkins and Thurston, in their thesis work, 
have discovered something new in butter mak- 
ing. Instead of getting an "overrun" last Sat- 
urday, they obtained an "underrun. " 

The manager of the Coop, bookstore wo-ild 
be duly grateful if the boys would not wait 
until they come into the store to get "stung." 
He does not wish the past recalled to his 
memory. 

"Mike" Denslow, the Nebraska short stop, 
is captain of the University team. He says if 
K. U. does not come to their terms soon, a 
meet may probably be arranged for with 
K. S. A. C. 

Coach Quigley, in his remarks to the boys 
Saturday night, said: "College spirit makes 
the team and the team makes the school." 
The professor who turned in his grand- stand 
tickets and all other "pikers" would do well 
to make a note of this. 

Last Thursday when Professor Se heifer left 
the /oology class to exchange el ass books and 
bring in 'a few wild animals, the "queen" 
aroused the subjects to revolt. When the Pro- 
fessor returned with bis menagerie but few 
lovers of "wild" animals were present. 



SvARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 

i 



Headquarters for College Text-Books 
and College Supplies of all Kinds 



Spalding's Line of Baseball and Sporting Goods 

East man's Kodaks and Camera Supplies 

Brownie Kodaks Only $1 and $2 

Ketiffel & Esser Line of Drawing Tools and Material 



Prices Guaranteed as low as the lowest 



31 1 Poyntz Avenue 



394 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



WE WILL GIVE AWAY FREE 



A Magnificant Trophy Cup 

i — "-— - — — -■— - -■ — — — — ■ — ^_^^^^_^_^^^^_^^_ 

To the member of the K. S. A. C. baseball team who has the highest batting average. 
We carry the most complete line of Baseball and Tennis Goods in the city and invite 
comparison. OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT. 

ANDERSON'S BOOKSTORE 



Capt. Shaffer was showing visitors about 
College, last Wednesday. 

Since spring has come the demand for livery 
"rigs" is greater than the supply. 

The Vet. boys were so busy dissecting, last 
Wednesday afternoon, that they had to miss 
the ball game. 

Miss Livermore spoke in chapel Thursday 
morning. She ^ave a brief description of stu- 
dent work and life in India. 

Elmer Johnson has been very much annoyed 
lately because so many of the students mistake 
him for one of the engineering professors. 

The Armory "Docs" are talking of organiz- 
ing a society, in order to withstand the ad- 
vances of "General " Gaston's College guards. 

"Hob" C'assel is in La Junta, Colo., working 
for the Santa Fe. He writes that he is seeing 
lots of country and enjoys his work very 
much. 

Some of the Indian College customs which 
Miss Livermore mentioned in chapel last 
Thursday morning might profitably be adopted 
at K. S. A. C. 

The College of Emporia was defeated Tues- 
day, 13 to 0. Fury did the twirling act for K. 
S, A. C. Twenty -nine men faced him and he 
allowed but one hit. 

Doctor Goss is so absent-minded that he took 
a pitcher of water into the parlor of a neighbor- 
ing house and did not notice his mistake until 
brought back to earth by the voice of a pretty 
girl. 

Gifford's annual sale of Shorthorns will be 
held April 25. In past years Mr. Gilford has 
always received good prices for his stock 
because of his herd's high standard of excel- 
lence. 

The Ionians have proved to their complete 
satisfaction the truth of the old rhyme; 

Red and yellow 

Catch a fellow. 
They say it worked admirably. 

Harold T. Nielsen, '1)3, business manager of 
the Herald in 1902- '03, was married Wednes- 
day, April 11, to Miss Hope Sherwood, of 
Takoma, Park Md. Mr. and Mrs. Nielsen will 
be "at home" after May 1, at Arlington Farm, 
Arlington, Va. 



President Nichols and Superintendent Rick- 
man went to Junction City, Monday evening, 
to attend the State Kditorial Association. 
Mr. Miller will talk. Tuesday, on "The Coun- 
try Press and the Agricultural College." 

W. G. Beach, of the Fairbanks Morse Co., 
of Chicago, talked to the electrical engineers 
on gas-eleetric generator units," Apr. U. The 
Klectrical Department have one of these units, 
and Carlson, Dow and Stoddard are testing it 
in their thesis work. 

A new Ag. course was presented to the 
Regents for their consideration, but it will 
probably be revised Latin, Greek, or a few 
more terms of mathematics inserted, and the 
Ag. boys given permission to tack A. B. at the 
end of their names instead of B. S. 




Copyright 1906 



It wouldn't 
be summer 
without 
Blue Serge 

fl No one need be with- 
out a Blue Serge Suit. 
They are all the rage, 
more than ever this 
season. The most pop- 
ular are 32- and 33- inch 
long at $12, $13.50, $15, 
$16.50, 818, and $20. 
Kvery size. New Ox- 
fords for Ladies and 



b. Kuppftnheimerdt, co. Gentlemen, 

Chicago 



at 



E L Knostman's 



* 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



395 



A j . and ZIW 
Sch*K ' Books 



Spectacles 
Gold Pens 



R. E. LOFINCK [ 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

M i, Leal Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, Notions and 
Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIHLES. 



Notice. 

The father and mother of Mr. F. L. Osburn 
wish to extend their gratitude for the sympathy 
shown them by the Faculty, students, Y. M. C. 
A. and members of the Ep worth League through 
the sickness and death of their son. Those 
taking part at the funeral services are especially 
remembered, and may God's blessing crown 
their efforts through this life, and may we all 
meet again in that celestial day when friend 
shall meet friend and the sting of death is 
over. N, E. Osburn, 

M. A. Osburn. 



Web. Youngsters. 

The upper classmen of the Webster society, 
desirous of knowing just what kind of men 
would fill their places when they had com- 
pleted their College work, decided to let the 
youngsters of the society take charge of affairs 
for one evening. J E. Brock called the so- 
ciety to order. After finding out how our 
members were enjoying the beautiful evening 
in other ways than attending society, we pro- 
ceeded with the program, J. Coons introduced 
Misses Kammeyer and Coons, who favored the 
society with a beautiful duet. H. H. Lynch 
came next with a declamation entitled, "The 
Transmigration of the Soul." A. E. Imraen- 
schuh introduced Miss Hutchinson, who fur- 
nished the society with a piano solo. "Sol" 
then read the "Reporter," which was very in 
teresting as well as instructive. Then came 
the prize-winning number of the evening, the 
"Chalk Talk" by Col well and Winter. A 
miscellaneous number was next introduced by 
Smith and Putnam, in which recruiting officer, 
O. O. Morrison, enlisted and prepared several 
hoboes for army service. C. T. Gibbon fol- 
lowed with another miscellaneous number, 
which was an exhibition of the most marvelous 
institution of the age, where men were prepared 
for their life-work in a day. The Webster 
quartet furnished a couple of songs, after 
which "Banty" Williams closed the program 
with an impersonation of an Irish astronomer. 
After recess we had a short husiness session, 
but owing to the need of our presence elsewhere, 
we soon adjourned. c. T. G. 



A Few Exchange Items. 

The Washburn Revieiv is still discussing their 
basket-ball team and their efforts to become 
pugilists. 

The class yell of the seniors at Haskell In- 
stitute is : 

Rickety Rix ! Bessie Veix ! 

Seniors ! Seniors ! 

1906. 

The seniors at Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology will not wear caps and gowns this 
year at Commencement. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS 91.00 

302 Poyntz P, C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



Goto 



R, V, Dyer 



For Sheet Music, Pianos, Pictures, 
Wall-paper, and Paint 

West Room, Union National Bank Building 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 

offer you only the best. A) *v 

W, M. STINGLEY & CO. 

ao to 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc, 

The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

PorcelmJn bm th tubs tine line cigars and toilet articles 



396 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 






r 



71 



, 



i 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 






L- 






-±± 



We make all our own 

. . Candies . . 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies 



Phone 167 



All Kinds of 




Ice C 



ream 



■ • *• 



We Sell 

THE BEST 

Ff 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Fountain: 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
ICE CREAM SODAS 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



q 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. ^ If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
<J Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. ^ Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co, 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 FUbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 
9 and 11 Drumm Street. 



Oeneral Offices: 
7* Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 MeDermet Avenue 



I 



I 



J 



How the 



Fills Itself 



wm-J 13 *^ qmck ' sim P le pressure of the thumb and Conklin's Self- 
Filling Pen is completely filled. A collapsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel of the pen compresses, and when released, instantly draws in 
the ink through the feed channels at the point, filling the Conklin 
Pen ready to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. Dis- 
penses entirely with the old-fashioned drop-filler method. So simple 
that you can't go wrong-T-you can't get your fingers inky, or entail 
any loss of time. The lock-ring shown in the lower left hand cor- 
ner prevents the ink from being forced out after reservoir has been 
filled, either when pen is in use or in the pocket. 

The ORIGINAL and ONLY GENUINE 

Conklin's Self-Filling Pei 

is a marvel that has completely revolutionized fountain 
pen construction. Its surprising simplicity combined with 
utmost care in manufecture, makes it practically proof to 
trouble of any sort. Responds at the first touch to the 
paper— flows evenly and regularly until the last drop of 
mk is exhausted. Ink capacity as large as old style 
fountain pens, yet it never overflows when in use. 
Presser-bar prevents pen from rolling off a sloping surface, 
and is so arranged as not to be in the way when writing. 
Feed channels are thoroughly cleaned in the same easy way 
as filling. All Conklin Pens are unconditionally guaran- 
teed to fulfill all claims we make. 
If your dealer does notjiandle the Conklin Pen let us 
make you our Special Offer to Fountain Pen Users. 
Full information, with illustrated catalog, 
sent upon request. 

Sold by Dealers Every when. 
THE CONKLIN PER CO., 

514,516,518 



■ 

■ 

. _, 



Our Young M 




WK TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Olothss for the Young Man from 16 to 20 yttti o* IM. Oar wlta 
have the desired amount oi style in cut and make-up, while the fabric 
are the most appropriate. We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we have made ready for them > 

You'll Find Our Suits Different 



They are $10.00, $12.50, $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 end $22.00, 



flff 



IW 



. S. ELLIOT 




i 



Always 

Something 

New 

at 



We will save you money on 
your spring neckwear, laces, 
belts, bags, lace hosiery, etc. 
Our new line is in and being 
constantly added to. A new 
lot of carpets, and box paper 
just received. Photo supplies 
always fresh. :: :: H sj ;; 



THE BIG RACKET 



mm 



J 



/hJf 



%he Students' Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 





J 




I 



I 

I 



DAIRY SWEEPSTAKES X CREAMERY SWEEPSTAKES 



OHIO 

Grand Sweepstakes 
Dairy Sweepstakes 
Creamery Sweepstakes 

at the Ohio State Dairymen's 
Convention held at Dayton, Jan- 
uary 84-26, Creamery score, 97}; 
farm dairy, 97. 



WISCONSIN 
Grand Sweepstakes 

at the Wisconsin State Dairy- 
men's Convention at Waukesha, 
Jan. 30 to Feb. 2. Score, 971. 




CONNECTICUT 
Grand Sweepstakes 

at the Connecticut State Dairy- 
men's Convention at Hartford, 
January 17-18. Score 98. 



MAINE 
Dairy Sweepstakes 

at the Maine State Dairymen's 
Convention at Plttsfield, De- 
cember 5-7. Score 971- 



The United States Separator Holds World's Record lor Closest Separation of cream, and above Is 
another of the many lists of victories which show that The United States Separator Delivers the Cream 
In Smoothest and Best Condition to make the finest quality of butter. Free Catalogue on application. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., 



• • 



Bellows Falls, Vt, 



L 



(ISHTIIN DIVTRtBUTINCl W»REHOUSU THROUGHOUT THI UI4ITKD «TAT« AND CANADA 



I 

I 



l 
| 



=J 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



FOR 

Icevcream and 

Ice-cream sodas 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Sweep and Power Feed Mils, Disc Cultivators. Safety 
Cora Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns, Perfection 
Lawn Swings, Oak Stoves, Sash Weights, Chimney Caps, 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs, Structural Iron Work, Stove Re- 
pairs, etc. :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: . :: 

-:- •:- KANSAS 



MANHATTAN, 



J. Q. A. She 1 den 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. G. Plus. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Susses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage Hne, 

Meet all trains day or night, 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for ball 
games, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: :: :: :: :: :: 



PHONE 65 



H. 1. BarnhObse 



L W. Phillips 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Can furnish you with your College supplies. KEUFFEL & 
ESSER Drawing Instruments, EUGENE DIETZGEN Drawing 
Material, WATERMAN'S IDEAL Fountain Pens. 

Up-to-date Stationery. Special orders receive prompt attention. 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R, I. & P. Ry, 

Geo* T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



HEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KINGS 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Wait for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 1 57 

GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Hoods. Lawn Mowers aod Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

42 ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



Orr 



• STUDIO is the place to get 

O PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: ;: 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Subscribe for 

THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 



Ask the Seniors if we 

make them any 

pictures 




Wolfs Studio 




* 



398 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



JT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry-Goods 

We carry a complete line 
of wool dress-goods, silks, 
wash goods, hosiery, under- 
wear and notions. Grey Is 
very stylish this season. 
Among the d' ess-goods we 
have a grey suiting 46 inches 
wide for Si, grey mohair 36 
Inches wide for 50 cents, 
fancy grey mohair 36 inches 
wide for 50 cents, grey serge 

40 inches wide for 60 cents, 
grey voile 36iDches wide for 
50 cents. 




Buy 

Krippendorf-Dittmaon Co.'s Ladies' 
Shoes. They are the hest you can buy. 

Ladies' Gymnasium Slippers $1 * 1.35 



Ladies' Ready-to-wear 
Garments 

We have just in another 
lot of silk coats. These are 
in the newest styles includ- 
ing the full length, three- 
quarter lengths and Etons. 
Colors black and tan. These 
are very pretty coats 
and range in price from 
$4.75 to tie. We also have a 
nobby lot of walking skirts 
in greys, shadow plaids, and 
fancy mixtures which we 
would like to show you. 
McCall patterns, 10 and 15c. 
none higher. 



Every thin* in HARD- 
WARE, Best Groceries at 
lowest prices. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry -Goods, Ready-to-wear Goods, Shoes Hardware. 



GET BUSY 




Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Klrksvllle.Mo., 
and late of the Treating Staff of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free-of charge. :: :: :: :: :: :: 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office. 134-2 

Bank Bldg.. Booms 15-30. Res.. 134-3 



PROFESSIONAL. 



DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



But don't work and worry yourself to 
death to find style and comfort in 
SHOES, but go direct to 

THE LEADER 

They carry a complete line of Dry-Goods and 
Furnishings at lowest cash price. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 1S7. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Gave. 



Office in Union NatL 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 Rouse phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room 18. Union National Bank Building 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
N it Students OTme 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

Mouorbet^i^One Cultivate His Omn Genius 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., April 20, 1906. 



Number 31 



Euro. -Web. Spread 

The weather evidently feeling ashamed of it- 
self for spoiling the ejr# roast and ruffling sev- 
eral lo. tempers, as well as causing various 
Hamps. to mum hie unprintable words, decided 
to show the Euros, and their brothers, the 
Webs., how really enjoyable it could be. And 
it proved to us beyond a doubt that it was not 
always cross-ways with itself. 

Well, to get right down to things of interest, 
I might say that we started. 1 mention this re- 
markable feature, of the string of various fea- 
tures of interest that are to follow, because we 
actually started at the appointed time. That 
is, all but the general manager, 'May." and he 
was so busy waiting for his chosen Euro, that 
it was impossible for him to start any sooner 
than he did, (which he did; that is, start) and 
he got there, too. 

After we had ceased to arrive and all had 
got to their destination, our self-appointed 
scout, First Lieut. James A. Lupfer. executed 
a flank movement and got in without digging 
up. Then came a rush for the boats, which 
were sadly in the minority. So the slow ones, 
after watching the favored few launch upon 
their trips of pleasure, busied themselves in 
various pursuits of enjoyment and fun, which, 
from all reports, they found in everything 
undertaken. All the swings were put to their 
intended use, and so were the half-dozen 
cameras that possessed owners of forethought. 
And no doubt they will, at some time in the 
future, tell some very amusing tales. Some of 
the more sportsman- like rigged themselves out 
with hooks and lines, borrowed from a supply 
they found lying on a stump, and angleH long 
enough to catch cold. 

The next in order was a call to supper, which 
brought hungry picnickers from all directions 
only to And that the call had been given by 
two wise members in an attempt to lure a boat 



within their reach. This they succeeded in 
doing, and after a short ride they were called 
to the assistance of a brother's boat, whose 
oeeupa nts were stranded upon a post. After a 
series of maneuvers that excelled the battle of 
Port Arthur, they succeeded in bringing the 
boat and its cargo in to dock in time to gather 
up the remains of the feast, which the rest had 
enjoyed while watching the above-mentioned 
maneuvers. 

After supper we rowed, strolled, swung, 
bowled, sung and tripped the light fantastic 
until some of the more thoughtful ones sug- 
gested home. Then, tired and happy, we were 
rolled away homeward, making the hills re- 
sound with Euro! Euro! Reel and Wah! How' 
Wah! 



s. w. c. 



Emporia Easy. 

Our story of the ball game with the College 
of Emporia will probably seem a little old, but 
for the benefit of those who could not attend we 
will tell about it. The game was very one- 
sided, but it was interesting just the same. 
In some way the Emporia boys gave the audi- 
ence the impression that they were going to do 
something in the next inning, and this illusion 
was kept up till the close of the game. For 
this reason, as well as the fact that our boys 
kept things moving, the contest did not seem 
to drag. 

Of the Emporia players we can say but little. 
Their batting eyes seemed to have been left at 
home. Only one man got a safe hit, and he 
was so badly surprised as a result of it that he 
immediately went to sleep and was put out. 
Matthews, in the box, put up a good game and 
with proper support would have held our team 
down to a low score. 

The work of the College team was fairly sat- 
isfactory. No real hard chances were offered 
to any one, . so no bad errors were made. The 



400 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



principal feature was Fury's pitching. He 
made a record that will probahly stand for 
some time. Only twenty-nine men faced him in 
nine innings, of which twelve struck out, one 
got a base on balls, and only one got a 
hit. Fury didn't use his head, however, and 
at no time did he try to save himself. He still 
has a whole lot to learn about base-running. 
Cunningham led the team in batting, getting 
two hits out uf three times at bat. He also got 
a pretty sacrifice. In the seventh inning, with 
the bases full, he sent the ball to the center 
field for a home run. Cave, Strong and Mal- 
lon also secured timely hits. 
The score : 



Emporia. 

McCormick, c . 

LiaiT. ss 

Clymer. lb 

Everett, cf 

Thomas, If 

Lostutter. 3b . . 
Hardcastle, 2b. 

Payne, rf 

Matthews, p... 

Totals 



K. S. A. C. 

H. Strontr.lf 

Cunningham, ss. 

Porter, rf 

Mallon.Sb 

A. Strong, cf — 

Cave. 2b 

Haynes, lb 

Miller, c 

Fury, p 

Totals 



ah it H bh po A K 

4 9 

4 1 10 

5 11 4 
3 
3 3 
3 11 

2 6 2 

3 10 1 
3 3 

28 1 24 11 8 

AB B H SH PO A K 

5 12 2 

3 3 2 10 8 1 

3 10 110 
5 12 2 10 
5 2 110 

4 2 10 2 2 
3 10 18 
3 1 11 1 1 
3 10 3 

34 13 7 4 27 10 2 



By innings: 



Emporia.... 
K. S. A. C. 



lii 

-<)-0— 0— 0— 0— 0— -0— 0= 0-1—8 
.-0-2— 1— 0— 4-0-fl - 0-*=13— 7 % 



Struck out^by Fury 12, by Matthews 8; 
Bases on balls— by Fury 1, by Matthews 4; 
Two-base hits— Payne; Three-base hits— Cave, 
Cunningham; Home run— Cunningham. Um- 
pire, VanAntwerp, 

Chicago Olee Club. 
The largest crowd that has been present at 
any lecture-course number this winter filled the 
Auditorium the evening of April 18. Students, 
professors, business men, farmers— all were 
gathered there to hear the Chicago Glee Club, 
of whose fame we had been told. Our expecta- 
tions were fully realized, and perhaps at no 
previous time has there been such general 
satisfaction expressed as over the evening's 
entertainment. As usual the program, which 
was scheduled to begin at 7:45, began at 7:45 
plus twenty minutes. From the moment the 
quartet stepped upon the stage for the first time 
until they sang the last note of the evening the 
attention of the audience was riveted upon 
them. Each selection on the program received 
a hearty encore, which met with the kindest re- 
sponse, and yet in many instances the audience, 
like Oliver Twist, persisted in calling for more. 



One thing which helped materially in the en- 
joyment of the evening was the varied char- 
acter of the selections given. We listened with 
equal attention to "What the Chimney Sang," 
"Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Pep- 
pers," "Sunset," "Li'l Gal," "Blue Galilee." 
"Four Black Crows," and an imitation of an 
old-fashioned church choir. The two numbers 
by the trombone quartet formed a pleasing 
feature, considered by many the best of the 
evening. Then, too, the sailor songs given in 
costume were an enjoyable diversion. Special 
mention deserves to be made of the impersona- 
tion by Mr. Dixon of "The Hoosier from 
Greenville, county seat of Hancock county, 
Indiana." The only unfavorable criticism 
which could be made was that he spoke 
scarcely loud enough to be heard over the en- 
tire building. In homely language he told of 
his acquaintance with "Jim" Riley, of the 
"Old Swimmin' Hole," "The Man in the 
Moon," "A Summer Sermon," and then 
brought down the house by relating what Zeke 
Thompkins liked to eat. Aside from this num- 
ber the baritone solo, by Mr. Henry, and the 
tenor solo, by Mr. Turner, wore the only num- 
bers not rendered by the quartet. The song 
which came mostly as a surprise to the audi- 
ence and which met with the heartiest applause 
was that one dear to every K. S. A. C.-Ue — 
"Alma Mater." Although this lecture-course 
number is almost last in point of time, it will 
be ranked with the first in point of merit. 

A '08. ■ 

Ionian Special. 

A great many of us did not have time to 
attend the lo's. special program, Monday 
evening. However, the prospects for an en- 
joyable evening were too evident, and we 
yielded and took time. The old chapel was 
packed, and the audience was expectant when 
the curtain rose. Misses Jones, Brown and 
Nicolet played a piano trio in an experienced 
manner. We had hardly time to enjoy it until 
Grace Hawkins led us far from the realm of 
music across continents and time, telling us of 
I os. past, present, and future. 

Our visions were interrupted with a vocal 
trio by Misses Sweet, Biddisou and Lyman, a 
combination which proved eloquent and har- 
monious. Charlotte Morton then read while 
we saw things— shadows of an old man, his 
wife, and daughter with her three lovers. This 
number was so novel and well rendered that it 
"brought down the house." The "Oracle," 
by Ethel Berry, was brimful of humor and 
philosophy and was undoubtedly the best so- 
ciety paper that has been given in this College 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



401 



generation. Bessie Nicolet's "novelty music" 
was so vivid that one could imagine the 
Gypsy. Farrar and the Count Ward were 
members of Conreid's grand opera company. 

Helen Sweet sang "Voice of the Woods," 
and then our seriousness was over. The Dutch 
play was a comical comedy in which Marion 
VanLiew portrayed a conceited Dutch youth 
in such a manner that the audience was con- 
vulsed with fun. His sweethearts, Margaret 
Cunningham, Katherine Currier and Neva 
Larson, and her rival. May Umberger, were 
typical. The hero became the villain and it 
was over. The Ios. will receive compliments 
for days to come and justly, too. We do not 
begrudge our mite of praise. No Io. 



Alpha Beta Society. 

Saturday afternoon, after usual opening ex- 
ercises, Moffit declared unto us that there had 
been •» earthquake in San Francisco, Then to 
turn our minds from such a dreadful thing, he 
told us of the new motor skates coming into 
use. We were just getting interested in the 
skates, when he loaded us all in the latest air- 
ship and took us sailing through the air at a 
rate of twenty-five miles per hour. For a while 
we thought it much sport to sail thus overland. 
For several hours we rode. As the shadows 
began to fall, we passed the home of Edna Bid- 
dison, and could hear her sing a song telling 
of her loneliness. The strains grew fainter, 
and soon we were far away. The night grew 
darker and darker. In the far distance we 
could see the gleam of a solitary candle. Ere 
long we were over it, and what do you think we 
heard? Criswell was repeating a poem he had 
just composed, describing his feelings and 
dreams just after final. Well, we passed on 
with rather a melancholy feeling. We were 
tired from our long ride, but our ship could 
not he stopped; we must endure all things. As 
morning dawned, we heard music from afar. 
Nearer we came to it, and presently located it 
in a cosy cottage where Miss Hilliard boards. 
She was up early, giving diligent study to 
some difficult pieces. Our ship was going so 
fast that we heard only two of her selections. 
The morning air was bracing and now we rode 
with better grace. About ten o'clock we passed 
a city where a large crowd had gathered. They 
were listening to a public speech by President 
Matherly. He was revealing to* the people his 
presidential duties. Late in the afternoon we 
passed the Tolin home, where Bessie was en- 
tertaining a party of friends out on the shady 
lawn. They were talking over childhood days. 
Some of the girls sang songs of youth. Maud 
Harris exemplified that lazy feeling we all have 



in summer, when we like to lie in the shade of 
a tree and listen to the cheery note of the 
songster above us. By this time our ride was 
getting pretty tiresome. Some of our number 
were completely exhausted, others were seasick. 
Fortunately we heard Professor Durno calling 
up the spirits. Our ship was immediately 
steered in his direction. We laid our case 
before him and offered him a handsome sum to 
bring our ship to land. By magical art he 
landed us in South Society Hall, K. S. A. C, 
and we have solemnly deelarsd that we will 
not take another boat ride in the air. e. a. 



The Egg Roast. 

Promptly at 7;.'i0 Saturday evening a pass- 
er-by might have seen a number of Hamps. and 
ios. gathering on the lawn east of Fairchild 
Hall recruiting for the march to Cedar Bend, 
one of the bends on Wild Cat. The order was 
given and we marched away. We were almost 
lost when the glowing light of the camp-fire 
guided our footsteps to the camp. For the 
Hamp. committee, and of course a like com- 
mittee from the Ios., had been thoughtful 
enough to precede us to the scene. 

We were soon wandering about two by two 
looking for something to substitute for chairs, 
but were quieted by Davis, who announced that 
the eggs would soon be roasted. Seated 
around the bonfires were groups of shadowy 
forms singing songs and telling stories. 
Others, by the light of a candle, were hunting 
shells on the creek bank, while still others 
were gathering mud to blanket the roasting 
eggs. Some of our engineers built a bridge 
across the creek, but it proved to be only an 
experiment and consequently several of the 
party got their feet wet attempting to cross. 
The eggs were now roasted, so we proceeded to 
investigate the ability of the cooks. 

The menu consisted of roasted eggs, coffee 
and peanut sandwiches. Some adventurous 
spirits proceeded to launch the ship after lunch. 
Hastings christened it the Io. It was not sea- 
worthy, and the fish in Wild Cat gaze in won- 
der at the remains. 

As the hands of the clock were approaching 

twelve we departed for home, feeling that we 

were fortunate to have had the pleasure of 

participating in one more Hamp.-Io. egg roast. 

J. M. R. 

The students at Fairmount College have 
organized a Rooters' Club. It is for both boys 
and girls and meets once a week to practice 
, yells. Perhaps they heard an echo of some of 
the yells of the K. S. A. C. Rooters' Club 
down there. 



402 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 




Motto: LrrCvWT 
OwtCwiTiv*TtHi» 
Own Gewnn. •■*-• 

Id ted in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 

C. E. Whipple. '07 Ed! tor-in-chfef 

GrqverKahl.'O? Business Manager 

MAY Qbiftincj. W Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08 T^ocal Editor 

S. W. CONNINUHAM. '08 Exchange Editor 

H. R. Hillman.'O? Assoc. Business Mananrer 

J. E. Bkock. '08 Subscription Manager 

Grack Hawk ins. 'OS » A r , vA\t OVi 

A. G. Phillips, W ( assoc. uocivi ivauors 

Elizabkth Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

JAS. R. Coxbn. '08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To Insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hang on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion Is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Apr. 2n, 1906. 




miQRiMS 





The city fathers have heen as much absorbed 
in the recent primaries as we are some times 
over class elections. 



Most of us can understand the feeling's of the 
people of San Francisco in the recent disaster, 
as we ourselves have felt an earthquake. 



It has just been discovered that a student 
who most earnestly opposed the excursion to 
K. U. last fall tried to organize an excursion 
to the Caney gasser. 



The Baker Orange does not defend the attack 
on the eligibility of her basehail players with 
much spirit. The students there don't seem to 
realize that we would not make statements with- 
out first investigating their players' records. 
It is a significant fact that our general manager 
has as yet received no certified list of players 
from Baker. I wonder why. 



Society write-ups produce gray hairs with 
wonderful dispatch. Please write large, 
plainly, and entertainingly. 



Rain has not interfered with any of our ball 
games as yet. We want to thank the general 
manager for arranging the schedule so nicely. 



Is it possible that some of the fellows who 
congregate on the walks in front of the 
churches are students? It seems incredible 
that civilized fellows will behave so disgrace- 
fully as some of these do. Next time you see 
yourself blocking the streets just step back and 
take a good look at yourself and see if you are 
not surprised to find yourself there. 



We have entered a new era of athletic enthu- 
siasm in as much as there is a tendency to 
cheer our own team more and to disparage the 
visitors less. There is no reason why we can- 
not build up a reputation through the State for 
courteous and fair treatment. We have had 
nothing but praise for our behavior toward the 
baseball teams here this spring. Can we not 
continue to be gentlemanly and say nothing 
that hurts. 



Short Cuts to Popularity. 

"You can't get something for nothing" is 
just as true in college life as in business, and 
judging from the martyrs to popularity one 
sees in college, the old proverb cannot be re- 
called too often. We all know persons who 
have entered College this school year and who 
have tried to become leaders in school life in 
one short year. Popularity is the one aim of 
such persons. They sacrifice anything to reach 
the zenith of their popularity in the quickest 
time possible. They sell themselves to a clique 
which they think will bring them into the lime 
light. They never stop to count the cost. 

The instructors and upper classmen are 
watching the newcomers to find out what they 
are worth. Many students have promising 
careers before them, but live them up in one 
year, and then there is nothing to do but go 
back to their own little ponds and be big ducks 
there. It seems incongruous for a freshman 
and an instructor to be chummy, and in the 
eyes of the students it does neither very mueh 
good. There is the old story of the house 
built on the sand. Meteoric careers are not 
stable. If you must be popular, take honors 
as they come, win your popularity legitimately, 
and you will he respected. Short cuts to 
popularity always end disastrously. 



The young men who never make mistakes 
always die before they reach college. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



403 



Athletic Notes, 

The complete write-up of the baseball trip 
will appear in next week's Herald. 

Putman's brother raised the K. IT. record on 
hammer throw ten feet in the meet Saturday. 

The Heralds of six years ago speak of 
"the new grand stand." Jt seems that there 
were knockers in those days also, for some 
people said that it could "never be tilled. " 

The Olympian games at Athens are occurring 
this week. Moulton, of the K. C. A. C, who 
holds the K. IT. records on the sprints, is 
entered. Moulton was our football coach in 
1 900. 

A one-armed high -school lad, from Kansas 
City, Kan., ran the mile in 4:41 in the inter- 
scholastic meet at K. U. Friday. This is 
probably the best distance run ever made by a 
Kansas man. 

We hope that the reader of the Herald will 
pardon our delay in announcing the result of 
the basket-ball game played by the freshmen 
on their recent trip. The game was with the 
('lay Center High School and the score was 
Clay Center, 20: freshmen 11. We are of the 
opinion that the High School team won. 

The following are the records of the K. IT. 
class meet. People who imagine that farmer 
athletes are so badly outclassed should bring 
this list with them to the track meet at the 
Athletic park next Monday: 100, log; 220. 24g: 
440, 57; } mile, 2:0^: miie, 4:581; two miles, 
11:32; high hurdles, 17; low hurdles, 20; hig-h 
jump, 5:(i; pole vault, 11:4; broad jump, 20:1: 
shot, 33:4*; discus, 01:8; hammer, 128. 



fnterclass Track Meet 

The third annual interclass track meet will 
be held next Monday, April 30, at the Athletic 
Park. The program will begin at 2:00 p. m. 
The events will come in the following: order: 

1. 100-yard dash. 

2. Pole vault. 

3. ltt-pound shot put. 

4. One-mile run. 

5. Broad jump. 

6. 220-yard dash. 

7. 120-yard hurdle, 

8. 16-pound hammer throw. 

9. 440-yard dash. 

10. Running high jump. 

11. Half-mile run. 

12. Discus throw. 

13. 220-yard hurdle. 

14. 2-mile run. 

15. One-mile relay. 

Each class will be limited to two entries for 
each event, with the exception of the one-mile 



relay. The name of each contestant must be 
handed to the manager not later than Friday 
noon. 

The contestants have been working- hard this 
spring to make this and the following track 
meets a success. Nearly all former records 
have been broken in practice work. So come 
out next Monday and show the track team that 
you are interested in their work the same as 
you are in the baseball team, and you will thus 
make the fellows think that their hard work on 
the track this spring has not been for nothing, 
and they will work all the harder for the com- 
ing intercollegiate track meets this spring. 

Officers: Clerk of court- Ham il Urn: referee- 
Anderson: timers and judges— Seaton, Ryer, 
andHalstead; starter -Kammeyer. Admission] 
free. 

'Nature, impartial in her ends 

When she made man the strongest 

In justice, then, to make amends. 
Made woman's tonttue the longest." 



K. S. A. C. II, Haskell 0. 

As a starter on their trip our baseball team 
handed a complete shutout to the famous Has- 
kell Indians. The score is decisive and leaves 
no doubt of the ability of our boys to play 
ball. It seems that Haskell must have had an 
off day, as several of our visiting beams have 
had. Mai Ion tossed the sphere for us and put 
up a faultless game. Haskell got two hits, but 
badly isolated. Haskell tried two pitchers and 
let Cave have two hits and Mai Ion, Miller, 
Haynes and Cunning-ham one each. The red- 
skins made fifteen errors while our team made 
only three. Batteries— K. S. A. C, Mai Ion 
and Miller: Haskell, McLean, Hill, and Baird. 

We Skinned Baker. 

Mike's boys beat the Baker professionals 
Tuesday with a score of 2 to 1. Not an error 
was made by our boys. * 'Choppy" allowed 3 
hits and struck out 10 men. Mason of Baker 
gave 8 hits and struck out 3 men. Al. Strong- 
made a home run. "Choppy" got two hits. 
This puts him at the head of the batting list. 
Hits were also made by Cave, "Ikey," and 
Haynes. 

Coxen made a face at the umpire. 

The investigating- committee had found that 
the life preservers were stuffed with breakfast 
food instead of cork. 

"How do you explain this?" the manufac- 
turer was asked. 

"Why," he said, "it's just as good as cork 
until it gets soaked, and we -er— figure that 
some sort of relief ought to arrive by that 
time. "— Chicago 1'ribune. 



404 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Coming Events. 

April 20, Opening I. O. O. F. Home. Eureka 
Lake. 

April 27, Baseball, Ottawa rs. K. S. A. C. 

April 28, Franklin Society Special. 

April 30, Interclass Track Meet. 

May 1, Baseball, Baker m. K. S. A. C. 

May 1, Annual Inspection of Battalion. 

May 2, Lecture Course ( Wickersham ). 

Mav 5, Baseball, State Normal vs. K. Sv 
A. CC 



The juniors will edit the Herald next week. 

Allen Philips helped the lonians decorate 
Monday. 

Mi«s Stella Williams went home for a visit 
last week. 

E. S. Taft, 'OS, rode to Topeka on his bicycle 
last Friday. 

Miss V. Brooks visited at home Saturday 
and Sunday. 

"I key's" picture will app9ar in the next base- 
ball score-book. 

Work on the '(Hi catalogue is being pushed 
by the Secretary. 

Miss Barbour was visited by her father from 
Minneapolis last week. 

Arthur Kiene enjoyed a visit from his sister 
for a few "days last week. 

Will Thayer, of Topeka, visited his sister 
last Saturday and Sunday. 

Bosco was canned last week on account of 
showing too much class spirit. 

Harry Brown tuned the pipe-organ at the 
Methodist church one day last week. 

Nat Goodwin, '05, went to Topeka to take 
the civil service examination Friday. 

Miss Thayer spent Sunday evening at the 
home of Mrs. Calvin on College Hill. 

Some copy came into the Herald sanctum 
this week smelling like fried potatoes. 

Some of the "lo" girls are becoming adept 
in the art of driving horseless carriages. 

Arthur Kiene went to Kansas City, Friday, 
on business concerning the "'06 Banner." 

The Herald staff does not agree to interpret 
the jokes that appear in the class special's. 

The battalion did not go to Eureka Lake on 
account of the nearness of annual inspection. 

The baseball boys, accompanied by Jim 
Coxen and Kiene, got up before breakfast 
Monday morning to take the train for Baldwin. 



The gymnasium classes have begun practic- 
ing for an exhibition to be given some time in 
May. 

"Son John" was seen riding his bicycle on 
the sidewalk last Monday. "Sonnie" better 
look out. 

Professor Brink's daughter, Gertrude, has 
been quite sick with pneumonia, but is now re- 
covering. 

The Vets, camped outside, last Thursday and 
Friday, on account of an odor caused by treat- 
ing a colt's head. 

Ask Shuler about the "extra 



wrap 
getting "stung 



<. 



'i 



that he 
in the 



advised; also about 
"coop" bookstore. 

Tom White has been writing spring poetry 
on the subject. "Nearestand Dearest." It will 
appear in a Herald in the near future. 

I. D. Graham, formerly Secretary of the Col- 
lege but now with the Katutas F^armer. was 
around College for a day or so last week. 

Capt. H. R. Heim and Lieut. M. R. Shuler 
have resigned and quit drill. Company C has 
l>een merged with the other three companies. 

Rumor says that several Io's. fell in the creek 
and that some noble Hamps. covered them- 
selves with mud and glory in rescuing them. 

Don't miss the prayer meeting at the Y. M. 
C. A. parlors Thursday evening. E. C. Farrar, 
leader. Subject, "On the Mark ; Get set ! Go." 

John Eastman, of Topeka, came up to visit 
his brother, Asst. R, E. Eastman, last Friday. 
Their sister Malwl was here at the same time. 

The poultry department is jubilant because 
the pheasants are laying. These birds were 
captured while in a wild state and shipped 
directly here. 

The sophomore basket-ball teams have had 
their pictures taken. They will he published 
in the "'OH Banner" and in the sophomore 
number of the Herald. 

Frank Harris came up from Kansas City 
Sunday for a short visit with friends. He is 
weighing mail for Uncle Sam on the IT. P. be- 
tween K. C. and SaHna. 

"Swud" Lawson has the string-halt and 
sweeney, and there are probabilities of a ring 
bone and fistula development, as a result of 
overwork last Saturday night. 

"Hiram" Conwell treated six of his friends 
to a dish of ice-cream last Thursday. They 
got a spoon apiece and then lined up and 
marched past the dish, taking one spoonful at 
a time. 

Miss Lena Finley, '05, left last Wednesday 
for California, where she expects to spend the 
summer with her sister, Miss Emma Finley. 
She went by way of Texas, where she will visit 
a short time with relatives. 

Harry Brown will carry a "prod pole" with 
him after this on dress parade. This is to keep 
the boys awake. He has made the rule that 
"Each player must commence to play within 
five minutes after the signal or forever hold his 
piece." 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



405 



NEW CLOTHING 



NEW GOODS arriving daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: :: :: :: :: 



NEW SHOES } 
NEW HATS f 



Meet our 



t 



t17 JOHN COONS, of Course 



I 



t 

Walkover t 

Shoes $ 





Have you lieen fishinj* yet? 

Prof. O. Erf was in chapel one day last week. 

"Swud'' Lawson went boat riding last Sun- 
day. 

Remember the interclass meet, next Monday, 
April 30. 

Prof. O. Erf is away ajfuin on a we.ek's in- 
stitute trip. 

Professor Dickens was in Kansas City last 
Saturday. 

Davis and White are buildm"- a magnetic 
separator. 

Ask Martin Shuler if he took an extra wrap 
last Saturday night. 

Bunn Thurston will go to Sedalia Friday to 
attend a convention of the Christian Endeavor. 

Laura Lyman fell into the ere?k last Satur- 
day nitfht. We wonder where Chauneey was? 

The marriage of Miss Edith Huntress and 
Woo. J. Bhoades, of Olathe, will take place 
May 10. 

"Mike" has sufficiently recovered from his 
recent illness to accompany the baseball team 
on the trip. 

"Pat" Ireland took his first lesson in sheep 
shearing last week. It took him nearly an af- 
ternoon to finish one sheep. 

The seniors had the honor of having- their 
special number of the Herald placed in the 
corner-stone of the new court house. 



Professor Dickens says that the students are 
complying with his request to keep off the 
grass much b:Ht3r this spring than usual. 

The Animal Husbandry Department has re-- 
cently purchased a new white Shorthorn calf to 
finish out the herd for next winter's shows. 

The Dairy Department has fifty pounds of 
good cheddar cheese that was made by stu- 
dents last winter. It is for sale at from 12c to 
15c per pound. 

The Ionian special program in the old chapel 
was well attended Monday evening. They are 
receiving many compliments on the success of 
their "special.' 1 

Baker's professional team will be here next 
Tuesday. Five of their players played in the 
Central Kansas League last summer with 
"Bob" and "Al" Cassel. 

Miss Thayer and Willis McLean will attend 
the State meeting of student volunteers to he 
held at Lawrence from Friday until Sunday. 
Both are on the program. 

Members of the Boys' Rooters * Club are re- 
quested to "dig up a dime" at once. Very 
few have as yet paid their assessment. It can 
be paid to any of the officers. 

F. J. Habiger, of Bushton, Kan., a graduate 
in the later 00' s, had every building but his 
granary blown away by a cyclone last week. 
He wrote to Professor Dickens to see if a car- 
penter could be procured. He says $4.00 a day 
won't get one out there. 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 



Headquarters for College Text-Books 
and College Supplies of all Kinds 



Spalding's Line of Baseball and Sporting Goods 

Eastman's Kodaks and Camera Supplies 

Brownie Kodaks Only $1 and $2 

Keutfel & Esser Line of Drawing Tools and Material 



Prices guaranteed as low as the lowest 



3 1 1 Poyntz Avenue 



406 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



WE WILL GIVE AWAY FREE 



A^ Ma gnifica n t Trophy Cu p 

To the member of the K. S. A. C. baseball team who has the highest batting average. 
We carry the most complete line of Baseball and Tennis Goods in the city and invite 
comparison. OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT. 

ANDERSON'S BOOKSTORE 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Myrtle Mather, '02, has recently b^en elected 
to the chair or Home Economics at Lincoln 
College, Lincoln, 111. 

E. W. Coklrcn. who will be remembered by 
many in bis place behind the but in the spring 
of '01, attended the game with Emporia last 
week. He is interested in the "Overland Her- 
ald." and had been attending the State Editor- 
ial Convention at Junction City. 

The resident alumni met in the Secretary's 
office at College on the evening of April ltt to 
discuss the future management of the Jaiffutirker 
and also to plan for the entertainment of the 
visiting alumni at ( 'ommencement time. A com- 
mittee was appointed to send out a circular let- 
ter to each alumnus, and it is hoped they will 
reply and express their opinion on the matter 
of the future management of the alumni paper. 
This matter will he brought up again at the 
.Tune meeting. The local alumni will entertain 
tlie visiting alumni and the '00 class at Com- 
mencement time. 

Professor Kinzer s wife is again able to walk 
about. 

"Bunn" Thurston went to Sedalia, Kan., 
last Sunday. 

Prof. A. M. TenKyck is away this week on an 
institute trip. 

The Dairy Department has named a brindle 
Jersey calf, "Abearn." 

Assistant Kyle is teaching Professor Ten- 
Eyck's classes this week. 

Professor Kinzer was sent to Leonard vi lie 
last Monday as a delegate to the Republican 
county convention. 

The Animal Husbandry Department is boast- 
ing of the fact that fifteen or the ewes have 
twenty -three lambs. 

The Animal Husbandry Department sold two 
Shorthorn cows, College Queen and Queen of 
Eureka Valley, at the Gifford sale. 

L. W. Lawson tested a motor the other day 
which he says was affected with indigestion. 
Mr. Anderson informed him that the remedy- 
was the use of appetizing currents. 



Cannot something be done to preserve the 
beautiful dandelions being so ruthlessly 
slaughtered by Professor Dickens* force? 

Prof. K.— "For what can a congressman he 
arrested travelling to or from Congress?" 
Miss W. — ''Treason or breach of promise." 

Tn a recent local this item appeared: "The 
Herald office was* swept out one day last 
month, for which we are truly grateful." It 
should read "every day last month." 

The Hort. Department has recently secured a 
new span of mules. They are the mules which 
the Animal Husbandry Department raised. 
This team is probably one of the best in the 
State. 




Copyright 1906 



It wouldn't 

be summer 
without 
Blue Serge 

• 

fl No one need be with- 
out a Blue Serge Suit. 
They are all the rage, 
more than ever this 
season. The most pop- 
ular are 32- and 33-inch 
long at $12, $13.50, $15, 
$16.50, $18, and $20. 
Every size. New Ox- 
fords for Ladies and 



b. KuppD->hcimer& Co. Gentlemen. 

Chicago 



at 



R L. Knostman's 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



407 



I 



SchtK ' Books 



dold 



Spectacles 



M 



R. E LOFINCK [ 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

ical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, Notions and 
Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BI ULES. 



K. S. A. £ Directory. 

HAMILTON SOCIETY. 

President . . C. E. Davis 

Vice-president A. D, Hollow ay 

Secretary C. G. Nevtns 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in north society 
hall. 

WBBSTEB SOCIETY. 

President W. A. Conner 

Vice-president P. W. Caldwell 

Secretary J. E. Brock 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in south society 
hall. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY. 

President E. W Matherly 

Vice-president., Anna Tolin 

Secretary Walter Zahnly 

Meets in south society ball at 2:00 p. m . 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY. 

President E. L. Shattuck 

Vice-president Almira Kerr 

Secretary 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 7:30 P. m. 

IONIAN SOCIETY. 

President Alma McRae 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Blanche Robertson 

Meets in north society hall Saturday at 2:45 p. it, 

BUBODRLPHIAN SOCIETY. 

President Gabrlella Venard 

Vice-president. Marie Coons 

Secretary Adah Lewis 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 2:45 p. if. 

Y. M. C. A. 

President A. D. Holloway 

Vice-president C. E. Whipple 

Secretary .R. W. Hull 

General Secretary W. W. McLean 

Sunday afternoon meetings in Association parlors, at 
3:30. 

Y. W. C. A. 

President Flora Hull 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary , Ella V. Brooks 

3eneral Secretary Miss Thayer 

Weekly meeting during noon hour each Saturday in 
south society hall. The Home, 617 Manhattan Ave. 

ENGINEERS' ASSOCIATION. 

President J. L.Dow 

Vice-president Smith Faris 

Secretary W. W. Carlson 

Meets Saturday evening in C 60 at 7:30. 

AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION, 

President W. A. Conner 

Vice-president W. E, Watkins 

Secretary W. B. Gernert 

Meets Saturday at 2:30 In Ag. Hall. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

President E. L. Adams 

Vice-president A. D. Holloway 

Secretary C. E. Whipple 

General Manager Prof. Q. A. Dean 

Meets at call of the president. 

GIRLS' ROOTERS' CLUB. 

President Boline Hanson 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Grace Hawkins 

Leader Catherine Ward 

BOYS' HOOTERS' CLUB. 

Chairman A. D. Holloway 

Vice-chairman J. R. Coxen 

Secretary - B. H-. Wilber 

Treasurer J. E. Brock 

Meets at the call of the chairman'. • 



•+m^m^m 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS Si. 00 
302 Poyritz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



Go to 



R, V, Dyer 



For Sheet Music, Pianos, Pictures, 
Wall-paper, and Paint 

West Room, Union National Bank Building 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best, X X 

W, M. STINGLEY & CO 

QO TO 

ft L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of clarars and toilet 
articles. Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 

- - — - -— * . .^ ^^^_^^. 

L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bmth tubs fine line cigar a Mod toilet articles 



408 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



r 



71 



I 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



i 



i 



We make all our own 

. . Candies . . 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



*±_ 



Phone 167 




We Sell 

THE BEST 
w 



All Kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



I 






^| p " Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
OUn lain . ICE CREAM SODAS 



I 




Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



«I 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. f If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
€J Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. If Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

rmr*r.n 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and II Drumm Street. 



General Offices: 

74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 
and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 






M 



How the 



KiMliOt 



Fills Itself 



Just a quick, simple pressure of the thumb and Conklin's Self- 
Filling Pen is completely filled. A collapsible ink reservoir in the 
barrel of the pen compresses, and when released, instantly draws in 
the ink through the feed channels at the point, filling the Conklin 
Pen ready to write within 10 seconds after it becomes empty. Dis- 
penses entirely with the old-fashioned drop-filler method. So simple 
that you can't go wrong — you can't get your fingers inky, or entail 
any loss of time. The lock-ring shown in the lower left hand cor- 
ner prevents the ink from being forced out after reservoir has been 
filled, either when pen is in use or in the pocket. 

The ORIGINAL and ONLY GENUINE 

Conklin's Sell-Filling Pen 

is a marvel that has completely revolutionized fountain 
pen construction. Its surprising simplicity combined with 
utmost care in manufacture, makes it practically proof to 
trouble of any sort. Responds at the first touch to the 
paper — flows evenly and regularly until the last drop of 
ink is exhausted. Ink capacity as large as old style 
fountain pens, yet it never overflows when in use. 
Presser-bar prevents pen from rolling off a sloping surface , 
and is so arranged as not to be in the way when writing. 
Feed channels are thoroughly cleaned in the same easy way 
as filling. All Conklin Pens are unconditionally guaran- 
teed to fulfill all claims we make. 
If your dealer does noUhandle the Conklin Pen, let us 
make you our $ fecial Offer to Fountain Pen User?. 
Full information, with illustrated catalog, 
sent upon request. 

Sold by Dealers Everywhere. 
THE CONKLIN PEN CO., 

514, 516, 518 Jefferson Ave*, Toledo, Ohio. 

TbeE.A.WUhdmlCo.,9SHe»deSUIIewYork. 
1«S2 Cortti St. Denver, 
cent Co.. 4H Market St, 
Sin Francac*. 
rlean Agencies, Ltd., 38 Shoe Lane. 
Fleet St,* London, EL C* f*nf • 
t, Mann 4 Gilbert, 47 Market St, 



■tt- 



1 












t 



. 









* 









\ 



I 



r 



Our Young Men's Suits 

WE TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Clothes for the Young Man from 16 to 20 years of age. Our suits 
have the desired amount of style in cut and make-up, while the fabrics 
are the most appropriate. "We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we have made ready for them 

You'll Find Our Suits Different 

They are $10.00, $12.50, $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 and $22.00. 



|W 



S. ELLIOT 



312 

POYNTZ 

AVE. 




Always 

Something 

New 

at 



— 



We will save you money on 
your spring neckwear, laces, 
belts, bags, lace hosiery, etc. 
Our new line is in and being 
constantly added to. A new 
lot of carpets, and box paper 
just received. Photo supplies 
always fresh. ;: :: :: :: :: 



THE BIG RACKET 



•*• 



iM ^ 



*3Ehe Students' Herald 




Junior Number 



IT 



I 

I 



I 

I 




FOUR CENTS MORE FOR NO. 1 CREAM 

THAN FOR NO. 2 



The creameries of the country 
have become so convinced of the 
Increased value of thick cream 
over thin cream that many of 
them are paying a premium on 
cream containing 30 per cent or 
more butter fat over that con- 
taining under 30 per cent. 

One of the largest buyers or 
cream in the West, the Hanford 
Produce Co.. of Sioux City, la,, 
issued In January the following 
statement to its cream shippers: 
"We are going to offer a pre- 
mium of 4 rents )>tr pound butter 
fat for what we term No. 1 
cream. First-grade cream 
shall consist of all hand-sepura- 
lor cream which is delivered at 
least twice a week in winter 
and three times per week in 
summer, this cream to be de- 
li vered reasonably sweet and 
testing 10 per cfnt o f m o r e. 
Second-Grape cream shall con- 
sist of all hand-separator cream 
delivered in good condition not 
less than once a week or testing 
lex* than tOptr rent." 




Under these conditions cream- 
ery patrons should buy only the 
cream separator that can skim 
ft heavy cream. The 

UNITED STATES 
CREAM SEPARATOR 

can skim a heavier cream than 
any other and do it Without rtoa- 
ainy. The U. S. has the record 
of skimming a cream testing #0 
i)tr cent. And remember also 
that the U. S. holds the World's 
Record for clean skimming. .It 
gets the most cream and will de- 
liver as heavy a cream as you 
want. 

Write for a copy of our fine 
new 1906 separator catalogue 
No. 173. It tells trh it the U. S. 
can skim the Ftrtt-orad* cream; 
how it made the World's Record 
Tor clean skimming and many 
other things you should know 
before you put any money into 
a cream separator. Write for a 
copy to-day do it noir while you 
think of it. addressing. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., 



L- 



you 



We probably have a selling agent in your vicinity, and if so, will give you his name win 
the catalogue. It is his business to show you ft United States Separator if you want to 



BELLOWS FALLS. 

VERMONT 

when we send 
see one. 



I 




Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 



BOYS! 

IKE HOLBERT'S 



FOR 

Icecream and 

Ice- cream sodas 



GO TO 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. Disc Cultivators, Safety 
Corn Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns, Perfection 
Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves. Sash Weights, Chimney Caps, 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs. Structural Iron Work. Stove Re- 
pairs, etc. :: " '•'■ " " '•'■ '•'• '•'■ '■■ '•'■ 



MANHATTAN, 



KANSAS 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line, 

Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for ball 
games, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. ;: :: :: :: :: :: 



PHONE 65 



H. J. Barnhouse 



L. W. Phillips 



a 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



409 



P OOOOOOOC< XC O O O OOOOOOCOOOCCOOOOOOOOOCOOOCOSOeOPOCCOO&OOOCOSQO! 




Can furnish you with your College supplies. KEUFFEL & 
ESSER Drawing Instruments, EUGENE D1ETZGEN Drawing 
Material, WATERMAN'S IDEAL Fountain Pens. 

Up-to-date Stationery. Special orders receive prompt attention. 



O O OOOQ Q O O OOO C O OOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOQiOOOapOOfSoaoOCOOgOO&OOOOOSOOOTO 



cmunc that 

OljSZUO grow 

Elevatof on C. R. I, 8r P, Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 113^15 N. Second St. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market, 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NG'S 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and (Jeneral 

3easonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

M ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 

and HARD and SOFT COAL. 
Phone 55 Phone 55 



ORR'S STUDIO 

North side o* Poyntz Avenue 



Photo'of any size or style. Souvenir Postal 

Cards of College and I. O. O. F. Home 

FOR SALE 



Subscribe for 



THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 



Senior Groups 



Basket-ball and all other 
groups will be ready in about 
a week. Leave your order 
for what you want. :: :: :: 



Wolf's Studio 






410 



THE STUDENTS' HiflKALD. 



JT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADK WITH 



JBkn 




WUh 



DEAUEi 



IN EVERYTHING -• 



Dry -Goods 

Have you seen the 

Dainty Swiss Organdies that 

we are showing at 50c tt yfl.1 

Printed Organdies at 860, yd. 

Dotted Swiss Muslins, 

Dresden Patterns at 15c. 

[lose Batiste at 1 5e. yd. 

New White Duck. 

HAND BAGS. 

WHITE H3D BELTS 

with the new fastenings. 




Buy 

Krippendorf-IHttmann Co.'s Ladies' 
Shot's. They are the hest you can huy. 

Ladies' Gymnasium Slippers $1 & 1.35 



Ladies' Ready-to-wear 

Garments 

Last week we received 
another large shipment of 
Ladies' Shirt-waist Suits 
which makes our line com- 
plete in every respect. 
These suits are beautifully 
trimmed with lace and in- 
sertion and cannot be sur- 

passed In workmanship. 
We have them in a {treat 
variety of materials, as Mull. 
Swiss. India Linen. Kismet. 
Duck. Chambray. Percales, 
and Lawns in white and 
colors ranging in price from 
*1.25to*H.OO. 

MeCall patterns 10c and 
15c. none higher. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 lor Dry -Goods, Heady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



IF YOU'RE THINK- 
ING WHY NOT ACT 




An Irishman once bought an owl. believing it to 
be a parrot, and a few weeks afterwards a friend 
inquired if the bird had yet commenced to talk, 
"Faith, no," said Pat. "but he is keepin' up a devil 
of a thinkin." 

We are glad to have you think of our dry-goods, 
shoes and oxfords, ladies' and gents' furnishings 
and can make a visit to our store profitable to you. 

MOORE BROS- & CO, 



Dr. A. R Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathv. Kirksville.Mo., 
and late of the Treating Staff of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free of charge. :: :; :: :: sj :: 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office, 134-2 

Hank Hldg.. Rooms 15-20. Res.. 134-3 



PROFESSION A L. 



DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 

31 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DIC. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building Fine 
tr (rid work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave HO 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Ofbee in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Union National Bank Building 



Room 16. 




___ 



The Students* Herald 



JUNIOR NUMBER 



MOTTO: "Our Creed Truth; our Field the World. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., May 3, 1906. 



Number 32 



Junior Crows. 

The naughty-seven class was hatched 
About three years ago, 
And K. A. C. has kept it growing 
TiU it's big enough to crow. 

And crow it does and crow it will, 
For it's lots to crow about; 
Just listen whilst I tell you now 
How it has put the rest to rout. 

Yes. it is the junior laddies 

Who win most every game,' 

Re it basket, foot or e'en a baseball 

You see it's just the same. 

When the juniors were but f reshies 
They won by three to seven. 
How they cheered, and how they yelled 
Their Zip} Boom! Heaven! 

When the juniors were but sophies 
The freshmen, just for fun. 
Rolled up their sleeves and tried 'em. 
But quit thirteen to one. 

And look now when they are juniors 
And play the Ric-a rae-a-rix. 
Beating them at basket-hall 
- With a score of nine to six. 

Yet again, now when they're juniors 
In football they do strive. 
And they wallop the mighty seniors 
By a score of rive to five. 

Other things that might be mentioned. 
How the track meets they have won. 
But this is quite enough to show 
Something ihat the class has dune. 

Ma v G « i v k i no . 

The Trip. 

VICTORY NO. I. 

The game with the Haskell Indians, on Mon- 
day, was the first and easiest victory of the 
trip. The pame was slow and uninteresting, 
and at no time did the Indians stand any tiling 
like a chance of winning. They made errors 
whenever possible and most of the time they 
went out in 1-2-3 order. 

Our boys didn't score until the fourth inning, 
when a base on balls, two errors, a sacrifice 
and two hits brought in three runs. In the 
fifth inning one score was made and in the 
sixth, one. In the seventh a balloon went up 
for sure. Four errors, one single and two 
sacrifices netted four runs. Pitcher McLean 
couldn't stand such fierce playing, so he re- 
tired and Hill took his place in the eighth. 
Hill had better control, and only one run and 
one hit were made. 

TheCollege boy s all pi ayed good ball . Three 
errors were made, but none of them were costly. 



Mai Ion pitched line ball and fielded well. Mil- 
ler did good work in throwing bases, and not a 
man stole second. Herb. Strong made a diffi- 
cult catch in the seventh inning, when he 
pulled in a line drive that looked good for two 
liases. Cunninglwim and Kahl both did fast 
work in the inlield. 

HAHK KLL. AB It H Pn A B 

Murie. lb .' 4 o o K 1 

Kneati, ef 4 u I 3 2 

Dupries. ss -) 1 2 :t 

Haird. c 4 o 3 2 2 

Brant, 2i> :i o o :t i 4 

McLean, p 2 (l 2 

Hill. p.. 1 U I (J 

Crotzer, rf 8 13 1 

Rom, If :t it 3 o 

Heed. 3b, 3 o 3 I 3 

Totals 8) tt 2 2T ft 16 

K. S, A. (', AH It H Pn A K 

II. Strong. If ' 3 I il J I 

(Cunningham, ms « I I i i Q 

Pinter, rf 2 2 2 

Million, p , .< « 10 6 

A 1. Strong, of 1 I it 1 

Kahl, 3b 4 1 3 

Havnos. lb .'i 2 I 11 l 

Cave, 2b.... 5 1 2 1 1 

Miller, c 3 2 l I 

Totals : 3T> 11 (i n 11 I 

By innings: 

it 

K. S. A . C. it— 11-0-3 -1-2—4-1—0= 1 1 

Haskell o-o-o-o * o-o-o-o-o= o 

Summary : Struck out- by Mallon 2, Mc- 
I>an 4. II ill .1; bases on balls— by McLean 4, 
Hill 1: hit with ball-by .McLean k double 
play Cunningham to Cave; two-base hit 
Kneau; sacrifice hits --Porter, Al. Strong, 
Kahl, Hayn^s, and Miller. 

VICTORY NO. I, 

The second game of the trip was with the 
Methodists at Raker I'nivei'sity. on Tuesday. 
This was the game we were most anxious to 
win, and ibis was the game in which our boys 
played the best. Baker has a habit of winning 
a majority of their games, especially on their 
home grounds, and it took hard, fast and 
errorless playing on the part of "the fanners" 
to break them of the habit. Defeat is a pretty 
bitter dose for the Baker- ites to swallow; in 
fact, it is so bitter that they don't know how to 
take it. A couple of trips away from home 
miiiht give them a few better ideas on the way 
to treat a victorious team. 






PW" IJ .> ■' A J '■ 



412 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



The game was fast and snappy throughout. 
In the first inning one Baker man got a base 
cm baits, and two men went down the same way 
in the second, hut their teammates couldn't 
connect with the hull for ;i safe hit, so they 
didn't score. In one first lime ;it bat two men 
went out at lirsi and one Tanned. Then in Ihe 
second inning, with two men out. Al. Strong 
came to bat and slammed the hull out to the left 
Meld. While Jones was trying to chase it down 
A I. circled the bases and came home. 

No more scoring was done until the seventh 
inning, when :i three-bagger, by \V. Lewis, and 
a single, h\ Gibbs; broaghl in Baker's only 
run. The score remained a tie until the begin- 
ning of the ninth, when a hit b\ Poller, ;i sac- 
rifice by Mallon, a hit by (ave and an error 
l>> < ; i hi is fjave us the winning run. in the last 
half the Baker crowd trieil hard 1> score, hut 
"Choppy" was too much lor them and the 
inline ended with a -core of 2 to I. 

We haven't much to say about the work of 
cither team. Every one of our hoys played 
errorless hall, so they couldn't have done any 
hetter. Cold well led in batting, getting two 

hits, Al. Strong 1 started his batting average 
and it counted, too. All three of the fielders 
played yon 1 1 ball. Herb Strong robbed -Tones 
of a two-base bit, and Porter threw Lewis out 

at first on what looked to he a clean hit. 



Bakbb, 

Jones, if 

V;m LaricliniUmm. ef. 
\V. Lewis, lb.., . 

T. EABWlS, BS..' 

Sn win. ;:u. 

OibbH, 2b 

Itliinm. C 

.M;i"im, 1 1 

I liumt>ion. rf 

Totals. 



Alt I! 



I 

3 
I 

i 
:: 

3 

I 

8 
8 

18 



ii 
(i 
1 

u 
n 
ii 
it 

II- 

II 
1 

It 


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I 



II 

1 



I! 

o 

II 
I 

I 

II 
I 



I "I I 

I) 

o 

10 
-> 

1*1 

2 



i:: 

(I II 

(I 

H pu 



II 
II 

I 


I 
I 



1 

•1 



I 

n 
III 

II 

•*7 



A 





I 

:i 

2 

2 

1 
■> 



11 

A 

ii 
■i 

I 
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ii 

ii 
1 
I 



K 

il 
I) 

I 
ll 

1 

I) 
I) 

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I 
II 
o 




Jl 
II 
I) 
II 
ll 

ll 



K. S. A. C. ah 

h. Strang, if :i 

< 'iiiintnifliitni. ss i 

Porter, rf t 

Million. 3b 3 

Cave, 2i> , . ( 

Al. Strong. cf I 

Hirvnes. lb t 

MIIUt. o 2 

L'okHvell, r :j 

Totals |i 

By innings: 

I t. i j t 

K.S. A. M-0-OHHNH-IsJ 8 Q 

K'.iker 0-0-O-fl-O— a— i-o— q=i | ;i 

Summary: Earned runs Baker 1. K, S. A. 
C, 1: three-base hit W. Lewis: home ran Al. 
Strong: bases on balls by Col dwell, .{; hit by 
pitched ball -by Mason. ^: struck out Mason. 
12: Cold well, in: sacrifice hit Mallon. 
VICTOR v NT), t, 

After winning two games it hardly seemed 
possible that luck would again favor the hoya 
and let them make it three straight. They won 
the third game, however, hut it wasn't luck 



that did it. ft was hard hitting and fine field- 
ing that defeated K. U. 

Things started in the first inning when each 
side scored two runs. The College scored one 
more in the second, two in the third, two in the 
fifth and one in the eighth. K. V. did not com- 
plete the circuit of the bases again until the 
seventh inning, tn the third and in the fourth 
they had men on bases with no outs, but a 
double play in each inning blighted their hopes 
of scoring. At the beginning of the last half 
of the ninth, the score sttiod H to 3 in favor of 
K. S. A. C. Then our hoys started on a 
balloon trip forborne. After three errors bad 
been made, Coldwell was put in the box in 
hopes of having better support. Without a hit 
K*. I*. scored three men and had two more on 
bases, but the boys took a brace and the 
agony was over and the third game won by v a 
score of s to <i. 

Fury pitched good hall, and it was not his 
fault that the scores wem made in the last 
inning, lie had errorless support up to that 
time, hut the K. V, rooters got out on the base 
lines and the boys went up. Al. Strong headed 
the batting* list with four hits out of four times 
at hat. Mallon put up the best game in the 
Held. He made five put-outs and seven assists 
without an error. The K. U. fans certainly 
opened their eyes at the fast work of the farmer 
infield. The hoys certainly had their batting 
eyes open. They found Jones, the left-hander, 
for a total of twelve hits, besides three passes. 
K. C. got eight hits off of Fury, one of which 
vras a home run by Bloss. 

K. U. AU It H Pn A I 

Johnson* 3b 4 2 3 2 2 3 

Bailey, ss • 3 1 2 11 

I irookens, c 3 < 1 5 1 2 

Bloss. ef 4 1 2 :i 2 

Wilson. If 4 2 I T 

Yimnjr, 1'b , g 1 « 1 1 

Hoffman, rf 1 a 1 1 a 

Hetlunwton.ah | | a g 3 ll 

.rones, p 3 1 1 1 n 

Totals 34 g I 28 Ht I 

Iv. S, A. G. AB R H IHi A E 

H. Strontr. If 1 | 3 

Cunningham, ss 4 1 1 3 *> 

w , » errt 5 I I • » " 

Million, :fb 5 3 2 r > 7 a 

1 ?ve, 2h ;;;. 5 a T 4 i i 

Al. Strong, ef 114 10 

ViilU-r. c. . . ., j j j i j n 

Haynes. Ih ..... t I o 10 o 

■V'J'yi'-- I 1 

l old well, p ., I 

Rotate.......... ;& s 12 27 12 4 

By innings: 

[V JV A ' ( ' 2-1 2 2 ll 1 -0=s 

K " u • 2—0-0-0—0—0—1—0—3=0 

Struck out— by Jones 3, Fury 3, Coldwell 1: 
bases on halls—off Jones 3, Fury 4, Coldwell 1; 
two base hits— Al. Strong, Bloss; home run— 
Bloss: double plays -Mallon to Cave, Mallon 
to B;i ynes: stolen bases— K. IT. i, k. S. a. C. 3. 




mp 



JQiVPf^? 9 "^ 



wm^mmmmmmmmmmmammmuQ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



413 



NOTES OF THE TRIP, 

Kiene made a "slide for home" at K. U. 

President Murlin instructed the Baker stu- 
dents to treat the team like gentlemen. They 
did. 

"They say;" that Cold well had luck, that 
Herb Strong 1 was a robber, that Miller was a 
gun, and that "Shorty" was sick. 

We didn't hear anybody express a desire to 
go to Baldwin any more. No one but 
"Shorty" Haynes wanted to stay all night 
there. 

"Boscoe," the big mascot, attracted a whole 
lot of attention. He also commanded a good 
deal of respect, especially from one fellow at 
Baldwin. His blanket was swiped at K. U. 

The members of the team changed Cold well* s 
name from "Choppy" to "Lucky." When a 
man headed the batting list with an average of 
.500 they couldn't very well call him "Choppy. " 

The line-up for Tuesday's game, on the Baker 
score-cards, showed Arthur Kiene at third base. 
For some reason, probably because of his 
professional record, he was not allowed to 
play. 

About the only thing that it was possible to 
get in the way of dinner at Baldwin was ice- 
cream and pie. Some of the boys thought that 
it was rather thin food, but it seemed to put 
them in good shape. 

A little excitement in the way of a railroad 
wreck was experienced on the trip from Baldwin 
to Lawrence. After a half -hour spent in mak- 
ing suggestions and in discussing the after- 
noon's game, the trouble was repaired and the 
journey resumed. 

The old K. S. A. C. students at Lawrence 
certainly treated the ball team all right. J. T. 
Skinner had the team take supper with him, 
and Will and Irwin Hai'old showed them 
through the light plant, treated them, and se- 
cured the privilege of using the Y, M. C. A. 
swimming pool. 

A fifteen-minute intermission was taken dur- 
ing the Baker game, in order that the annual 
Methodist Conference might meet. The Baker 
couch and captain had a dispute over the 
playing of one of the men and the game was 
stopped while they chewed the rag. The cap- 
tain finally won out. 



"What kind are you going to have for Com- 
mencement?" "What is your reception dress 
like?" "Oh, mine is going to be tucked." 
These are some of the questions under general 
discussion by the senior girls. — Ex. 



Rooters* Reception of Players. 

The reception given by the Rooters' clubs to 
our homecoming victorious team, last Thurs- 
day evening, wasn't one of those airy, fashion- 
able kind, but one so full of the spirit of the 
occasion that we doubt if Ca'sar was ever given 
a more loyal demonstration of "rock-bottom" 
appreciation than were our players. 

The ball was put into play as soon as we 
learned of the defeat of K. U. Long before 
train time all rooters and the rest of the stu- 
dents, even "Van" included, assembled at the 
depot with the band and a hack for the trans- 
portation of the players. As soon as the train 
arrived the boys, together with "Mike" and 
"Prexy," were, either ceremoniously or other- 
wise, packed away in the hack. This was then 
drawn by hand through the town to the lot op- 
posite the Presidents home. 

Here a bonfire had been prepared for the 
occasion. Of course speeches were demanded, 
so "Prexy" went to the bat but failed to make 
much of a hit. Some fireworks had also been 
procured, of which the President lit the first 
skyrocket. "Mike" came next and proved 
himself to be almost as good a "hitter" at 
making stump speeches as he is at coaching. 
He also lit a rocket. Then followed speeches 
by the remainder of the team, headed by 
Captain Cunningham. Even Kiene and Coxen 
said their little "piece" and were allowed a 
"flsszler," too. As each speaker finished, three 
cheers were given him in the hearty way that 
characterizes all of our rooting. 

This is by far the greatest reception that has 
ever been shown our team here, and is some- 
thing which will make each man on the team 
work harder and appreciate the honor of 
representing our College on the athletic field. 

K. S. A. C. 6, Ft Riley L 

The game with Ft. Riley at Eureka lake last 
Thursday was an easy matter for our boys 
after the more strenuous games of the trip. 
In spite of the fact that most of our boys were 
stiff and sore from the trip, they put up an 
errorless game with the army men and secured 
seven hits off Duffey. 

For a long time it looked like a shut-out for 
the soldiers, but a base on balls and a two- 
base hit off Fury in the ninth inning secured 
for them their only score. Our boys took the 
lead in the first inning when a safe by H. 
Strong, a two-bagger by Sol. and a single by 
Porter brought in two scores. In the second 
inning an error on the soldiers, a couple of 
sacrifice hits and a three-bagger by Fury 
scored two more runs. The remaining scores 
were gotten in the sixth inning. At this time 



**«.' . 






A Feu) of Our Baseball Stars. 




M, P. Ah earn. Coach. 




CahlMallon. Pitcher. 





Sol. rrsMM.HA.M. Captain. 



Carl Miller. Catcher. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



415 



Cave got a hit which, coupled with a sacrifice 
hit, several errors, and B's knowledge of 
football did the work. 

Both pitchers handled the sphere in good 
form. Duffey struck out fifteen men while 
Fury struck out twelve. Bases were stolen al- 
most at will by our players on their catcher, 
while not a single soldier fooled "Ikey" for an 
instant. 

H. Strong, Cunningham, Porter and Miller 
each got a hit. Fury got two three- baggers 
and Cave and Al. Strong secured, also, two 
hits each. 

The following is the score by innings: 



k. s. a. c. 

Ft. Riley... 



D UP 

.2-3-0— 0— 0— 2-0-0—0=0 7 
.0—0-0-0-0-0-0-0-1 = 1 4 8 



Ottawa vs. K. S. A. C. 

Owing to the rain in the afternoon, the game 
with Ottawa, last Friday, was exceedingly slow 
and wearisome at times. A new diamond was 
laid out in the southwest corner of the park, as 
water was standing over a large part of the old 
one. From the start our boys pounded Ot- 
tawa's pitcher most unmercifully. Nearly all 
got two or more hits off of him, several being 
two- and three- baggers. Not a single hit was 
secured off Mallon, and only three men faced 
him in each inning. At the end of the sixth 
inning most of our boys were. lame from run- 
ning, and the score keeper fainted from over- 
work, so we were unable to secure the score 
for the last inning. The features of the game 
were Cave's batting and a rabbit chase across 
the diamond. 

So Easy. 

"Wait till we meet K. S. A. C. on their field 
and the score will be reversed in greater 
ratio." —Baker Ortwje. 

They met us on our field on Tuesday and the 
ratio was greater, all right, but it was not re- 
versed. The final score was 14- to 1 in favor of 
the farmer "lnvincibles." The largest crowd 
of the season turned out in hopes of seeing 
another 2 to 1 game. The B>aker players did 
their part all right, but our fellows wouldn't 
stop when they got two runs. The game was 
the most one-sided contest of the season: even 
Quigley couldn't keep tilings moving fast 
enough to lie interesting. 

Our boys started the game by making three 
errors in the first inning. Baker got a man 
on first and another on second, but the boys 
settled down and shut them out. Then in our 
part of the first inning, there was something 
doin'. Herb Strong got a hit and Cunning- 
ham sacrificed him to second. . Then Al. Strong, 
Mallon, Cave, Miller and Haynes got hits, and 



before the side was retired five men had crossed 
the plate. 

In the second inning Mason scored Baker's 
only run by sending the ball over the right 
field fence. It was a dandy hit and he was 
warmly applauded when he trotted home. Our 
boys took a rest and didn't score again until 
the fourth, when they came home twice. In the 
seventh they scored three times and in the 
eighth they made four. Baker couldn't get a 
man past first base, although they secured four 
hits. 

Both teams played rather loose in the field. 
Baker seemed to give up after the first inning. 
They said they knew it was all up when Cold- 
well went in the box, Harry Porter did good 
work in right field. He made four put-outs and 
one assist. Each team pulled off a nice double 
play. 

Score by innings: 

It H K 

Baker 0-1—0-0—0-0-0-0—0=1 5 5 

K. S. A. C 5-0-0-8-0-3-0-4—*= 14 12 4 

Batteries: Baker— Mason and Bloom; K. S, 
A. C. —Col dwell and Mallon. 



Clippings from the Letters of the Devil Himself. 

Hades, May 1, 1906. 

Editor Students' Herald, 

Manhattan, Kan., 

Item- Sir. In answer to your inquiries about 
the students here, the reason why they are here, 
and their employment, I will say a few words. 
The '<Hi class is well represented here, their 
Herald staff arriving in a body on Friday of 
last week. Their punishment consists of read- 
ing what they have written before audiences of 
critical, but appreciative, imps. Some of their 
ideas met with enthusiastic reception. When 
the seniors gave their reasons for not being rep- 
resented, at the musical given by your College 
the audienee went wild, and the first thing I 
knew the audience was calling on the seniors 
for music. -I at once endeavored to prevent 
their compliance, but was too late. This insti- 
tution does credit to its name better now than at 
any previous time. The only senior to attain 
any degree of prominence here is R. A, Cassel. 
He is manager of the football games and has 
already purchased a supply of the most mixed 
language ever introduced at this place. I am 
very sorry to state that he uses a great deal of 
time making references to some professors who 
were his instructors while at College. How- 
ever, the real cause of his fall can be laid to 
his habit of keeping late hours. 

I have put the most of the seniors at blowing 
on the fire just under the room where the fresh- 
ies are dried. One of the best persons at this 









416 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



business we have ever received arrived yester- 
day. He was formerly known as Milo Ha sting's. 
If you can send me any information as to how 
you were ever able to keep him from talking 
while there I would appreciate it greatly. I 
closed his organs of speech for a short time 
once by putting him in a hath of hydrofluoric 
acid, but it was only temporary. He soon 
rose above the surface, brushed the hair from 
his eyes and spoke. I guess you have heard 
what he said, so I will not repeat it. By the 
way, Hastings has had his hair cut since he 
came, and his caudal appendage seems to be 
above suspicion now. 

There is one young man in attendance up 
there who is giving me a good deal of worry. 
We have been compelled to call on Captain 
Shaffer and his trusty lieutenant, D. H. Clark, 
in order to drive him from our gates. He at 
first endeavored to obtain entrance, but upon 
being refused took a position outside and 
began to sell views to the late arrivals. I nm 
afraid we shall have to fit up a separate dis- 
trict for him when he arrives to stay, as there 
is not much money here and what there is must 
be used in buying necessaries. 

I am getting up a history of this place and 
its management to be sent to Professor Price. 
You will find it on the reference shelves in the 
southwest corner of the reading room in the 
Library in the near future. 

A few of your students were so homesick 
when they first arrived that I was forced to fit 
up a place for them similar to your Library. 
It was no sooner finished than I saw a rush of 
students in that direction. Among them were 
Elmer Bull and Gaston and others equally 
well known to you. I wished to see what they 
were so anxious about so I went over. They 
were not reading, however, although I had se- 
cured some of the latest books by Professor 
Brink as well as several copies of the Indus- 
trialist. We have never had a scene similar to 
what I saw here before. As I entered the room 
I was conscious of a slight chill, and upon 
looking around saw the students sitting in 
pairs and directing chilly glances at me. I 
had a library built at once, but we use it as' a 
museum now and it stands open at all hours. 

I don't have much more to say at this time. 
I wish though you would try to reform the 
"view agent." I mentioned because it is going 
to put me to considerable expense to take care 
of him. There are a few other matters. A 
student arrived yesterday who persists in 
whistling in the halls and at all times. I can't 
stop him and I am threatened with a strike. 
If you can tell me what antidote you use I will 
obtain some immediately. The other morning 



when I went out to look over the establishment 
I found a lot of posters, headed "proclamation*' 
and having "don't get sore" printed around 
the edges, posted on all convenient walls and 
sidewalks. If the guilty party came from your 
College I wish you would take pains not to 
let any others get loose. 

In closing I would say that I have nothing 
but praise for- the system -on which your Col- 
lege is run. I can trace the fall of many other- 
wise bright and upright young men directly to 
practice, learned at your College, of putting 
too much trust in ponies. While no evil re- 
sults were experienced by the students when 
their ponies failed to make a successful race, 
in after life the habit was too strong for them, 
and I have them here and observe that they 
often wish they were back with you where 
ponies could be used with some degree of 
safety. "General" Hughes is here. He Is 
a fireman under our new building for view 
agents. He has military bearing, and on the 
way to and from work is frequently seen to go 
through the manual of arms with his coal 
shovel. But this is not against the regula- 
tions and so I have left him his last pleasure. 
The weather is warm here now; the baseball 
season opens to-morrow with a game between 
the "center" and the fire department. 

Hoping this will arrive in good condition. 
I am Yours, respectfully, 

The Devil. 

The Midnight Decoration. 

The way was "long and dark and dreary" as 
about two dozen junior boys wound their way up 
the cinder path that leads to College. If one 
had had eyes of a cat that night he might have 
seen each junior laden with a bundle of red and 
white. What their object was, no one knew, 
save they themselves. Some carried ladders, 
and some of the more thoughtful ones may 
have carried arnica or "witch hazel" in their 
pockets. As soon as they had passed the Col- 
lege gate their load began to grow lighter, for 
these juniors left their mark on every bush and 
tree. The vines on Anderson Hall and the 
rain pipe on Fairchild Hall were not forgotten 
( nor forgiven by Janitor Lewis ). 

As the students entered the College gate the 
next morning, imagine their surprise in seeing 
that the trees had been decked with with red 
and white instead of the customary green. The 
seniors, jealous of -natures preference, deter- 
mined to trample the royal colors in the dust, 
and so tied them on their shoes. When the 
juniors saw how their eolors were being dis- 
credited, woe to the senior then. He was re- 
spectfully asked to remove the colors and on 



:£. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



417 



declining, force was used. The juniors were so 
energetic in their work that one senior went 
home without his shoes. 

The seniors were not the only ones interested 
in taking down the colors, for they were helped 
by Janitor Lewis. 

Towards eight the sky began to grow dark, 
and as these same junior boys had already en- 
deared themselves to Mr. Lewis, he at once be- 
gan to take the colors down, when he saw there 
w as d anger of ra i n . Bu t e ven he coul d not work 
fast enough to get them all down, and to this 
day there may be seen a few strips of red and 
white about the campus. 



Interclass FMd Meet 

The third annual interclass field meet was 
held last Monday afternoon in the Athletic 
Park. The Physics Department had gotten 
their bid in for good weather in good season, 
for we had an ideal day for the meet. It was 
not over warm for the participants, and as no 
sun shone the spectators could enjoy every 
event to the fullest extent. Considering the 
number of the events the time required was 
not long, several being pulled off at the 
same time. 

The seniors and freshmen tied for first place, 
which will be decided in the near future. The 
juniors came third, and the aophies had a 
hard time bringing up the rear. The points by 
classes are as follows: Seniors, 48 points; 
freshmen, 48 points; juniors, 23 points; soph- 
omores, 14 points. 

The official score-card will appear next week. 

■ 

Reception. 

The advisory board entertained the Young 
Women's Christian Association at the home of 
President Nichols, East Park Gate. About 
seventy-five girls enjoyed the hospitality of the 

hostesses. 

The entertainment of the evening took the 
form of contests between Ottawa University 
and K. S. A. C. After being introduced to the 
members of the advisory board, Miss Cunning- 
ham claimed half of the girls for K. S. A. C. 
by pinning purple ribbons upon them, and 
Miss Berry forced the other half to wear 
orange and stand up for Ottawa. 

The first event of the schedule was the foot- 
ball game which ended in victory for K. S. A. 
C, 13 to 14. The debate, subject "Resolved, 
That K. S. A. C. is. better than Ottawa," was 
decided in favor of the negative. The next on 
the schedule was "Final Exams.," consisting 
of a spelling match between the two sides. 
K. S. A. C. showed great talent here and was 
victorious. In the next event Ottawa's repre- 



sentatives redeemed her by winning the baseball 
game. Commencement consisted of music from 
both institutions. 

After all the excitement of the evening, we 
were refreshed with punch and marguerites. 

A Junior Y. W. 



The Rose Bud. 

Nestling close to a tall mother-bush 
I saw a tiny bud fair: 
Upon its slender stem so green 
Tiptilted in the air. 

The little bud was full of joy, » 

It's pink heart all a- thrill 

With sweetness and a consciousness 

Of a mission to fulfil. 

One day, peeping through the fence 
The bud's pink heart beat wild, 
For just without the guardian walls 
There stood a blue-eyed child. 

Through the pales the baby peeped 
Stretching forth her hand ; 
The bud j ust nodded and beckoned 
But she seemed to understand. 

She plucked the half-blown rosebud 
And toddled down the street. 
Lisping to it softly 
In baby accents sweet. 

She took it up to Mamma 
Who has rays of sunshine few, 
For she sits in her well-worn rocker 
The whole of the long day through. 

She buried her face in its sweetness, 
Her eyes all aglow with delight : 
And for many a day its fragrance 
Made lonely hours more bright. 

If each of us were longing 

To do something, though small ft be. 

And so. like the rosebud, fulfilling its mission 

How much more we'd be then, like Thee. 

h. c. w. *07. 

Murrey Meeting May 6, 

Mr. C. D. Hurrey, of Chicago, is one of the 
best-known college' men of the West. He is a 
graduate of the University of Michigan, and 
since that time Mr. Hurrey has been closely 
associated with work for young men in the 
principal colleges and universities of the 
middle West. This work has brought him in 
close touch with all phases of college life, and 
he may be considered as an authority upon the 
various lines of activity which interest college 
men. Each summer about five hundred repre- 
sentative college men meet at Lake Geneva for 
training in the work of the college Y. M. C. A. 
Mr. Hurrey is the leader of this Conference. 

His visit with us has for its object the 
awakening of all the students in the building 
movement of the Y. M. C. A. The cooperation 
of every student is desired in the Sunday after- 
noon meeting, May 6, at the Congregational 
church. 

The law school of Nebraska University has 
been supplied with two dozen spittoons. The 
Nebrmkan deplores that their purchase was 
necessary, but who ever heard of a justice of 
the peace who didn't chew a plug a day V—Ex. 



418 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



The Students' Herald 

SPECIAL JUNIOR NUMBER 



Memo: "Our Creed Truth; Oar Field the World. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, In advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 

JUNIOR STAFF. 

C. Q. Nbvikh Editor-in-chief 

Maby Kimball ■ .Literary Editor 

May Umbbbueb Local Editor 

A. D. Holloway Exchange Editor 

5- F ? OKT ^ B [ Associate Local Editors 

E. L A PAHS \ " 

L. M. Jorgbkson Reporter 

Elizabeth Sweet, '01 Alumni Editor 

P. E. Lill Devil 



All orders Tor subscriptions and Inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
man alters. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion 1b due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Mat 3, 1900. 



X EDITORIALS X 



We understand that the baseball games that 
K. U. and Baker were going to play next week 
for the State Championship will be postponed 
to another season, when at least one has a 
claim to it. 



The junior Herald staff assume the respon- 
sibility of anything found in this issue, but we 
would like to express our appreciation of the 
very material aid given us by the regular staff 
For fear that some one might take the junior 
staff for old hands at the business, we would 
like tb say that this is our first experience in 
so arduous an undertaking. 



Has it occurred to the readers of the Stu- 
dents' Herald how important a factor the 
junior class is in athletics at this school? We 
are proud of the fact that members of our 
class have furnished a plurality of every base- 
ball and football team that has defended K. S. 
A, C. since we entered College. We boast of 
the fact that of last fall's football team there 
were seven juniors, on this year's basket-ball 



team we had two representatives, and the line 
up of the baseball team thus far this season 
reveals the names of five of our classmates. Is 
this not an enviable record for a class with less 
than one hundred men? 



Any one who has had the pleasure of attend- 
ing the society programs given in the old 
chapel this term can not help hut realize that 
the millenium is far from being reached. We 
refer to the conduct of certain young men who 
persist in making themselves heard above every 
one else in the room. It is hard for us to see 
how any one who professes to be a gentleman, 
or has any hopes of ever becoming one, can 
willfully make such noises as whistling, shriek- 
ing and various other sounds not usually 
heard in an audience which possesses the least 
degree of refinement. We have no remedy to 
suggest, but we earnestly hope that the time 
will soon come when we will be rid of such 
characters in our school. 



It is only two days until we again are treated 
to one of those delightful mid-term examina- 
tions which we are given at this school. In these 
tests a student is given forty-five minutes, at 
the most, to tell all that he has learned the 
preceding half-term. In the majority of cases 
we believe the instructor tries to give the stu- 
dent a fair deal. Yet after all if a student has 
done creditable work during the term, why 
should he be compelled to grind away at a set 
of questions in about half the time needed, and 
then run to the next class room where the same 
process is repeated. We do not pretend to be 
competent to criticize the rules and regulations 
of the Faculty, but would it not be better for 
all concerned if, when a student does make a 
creditable mark in daily grades and tests, he 
be excused from the examinations. This is no 
more than is done in some other schools and 
we believe it would tend to better scholarship 
and less cramming if followed here. 



Resolutions. 

Whereas, Death has entered the home of 
one of our classmates, Emily G. Smith, and 
called away a brother, be it 

Resolved, That the members of the class of 

1906 extend to her their heartfelt sympathy. 

Cora E. McNutt, 
Laura L. Lyman, 
E. W. Thurston, 
Committee. 

CoUeye Life states that the College of Emporia 
ball team left their hoodoo on the depot plat- 
form at Manhattan. Ottawa must have found 
it when thev came in. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



419 



X Knockers 9 Corner X 

From the actions of some of the upper class- 
men during class, it is evident that their home 
training has been sadly neglected. It perhaps 
does not occur to these students that it is un- 
fair to spoil a recitation hy their baby actions. 
Perhaps some of the instructors might furnish 
rattles for these children. This is respectfully 
dedicated to two members of the junior agri- 
cultural class. 

A Letter from Stubbs. 

The following letter was received by General 

Secretary McLean recently: 

Mr. W. W. McLean, 

General Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
Manhattan, Kan. 

Dear Mr. McLean: 

Your favor referring to the Y. M. C 
the Agricultural College duly received. 
pleasure in handing you herewith my personal 
check for $100.00 on this account. I regard the 
Y. M. C. A. as one of the greatest and most 
valuable institutions that has ever been organ- 
ized in the interests of the young men of our 
State and nation. It improves the mental, 
moral, spiritual and physical condition of men 
and reaches all classes. I have never been as- 
sociated in any way with any work which was 
so interesting and attractive to me as the Y. 
M. C. A. Yours very respectfully, 

W. R. Stubbs. 



A. at 
I take 



Hamps. 

When President Davis rapped for order, 
Saturday evening, there was a goodly number 
of Hamiltons present. Society was led in de- 
votion by F. L. Williams. The marshal was 
sent out into the hall with instructions to quiet 
the ruffians, to break the n«ws gently at first, 
then harshly. We next listened td episodes on 
a May night by Mr. E. A. Cowles. Then 
music by Joe Lill, who introduced Miss Lane 
assisted by Miss Jones. A. C. Auraan then 
gave us a reading— The American Indian in 
Oratory. Our hearts were again lightened with 
music by Miss Jones, introduced by John 
Porter. We then had the pleasure of witness- 
ing Wilbur's company of Zouaves passing in 
review. They made a creditable showing, due to 
their efficient drillraaster. In the critic's report 
we drew the conclusion that he might move 
to Caney and be substituted for the gas-well. 

After recess we bad a very warm business 
session in our attempt to tangle up the presi- 
dent. J. M. R. 

State Normals next Saturday. 




There is neither thunder nor lightning within 
the Arctic circle. • 

In Norway any one cutting down a tree must 
plant three saplings in its place. 

The Congo Free State has established a 
zebra farm for the purpose of taming zebras to 
harness. 

A dam now building across the Iowa river 
will make it possible for Iowa to engage in 
aquatic sports. 

A course in civil engineering is to be estab- 
lished in the Oklahoma Agricultural College in 
the near future. 

Vnirermty Life. Friends' University, are of- 
fering a prize of $16 to the composer of a suit- 
able college song. 

Wanted : Some one with a good interpreta- 
tion, so that expositions can be written more 
quickly for rhetoric. —Ex. 

Recent statistics show that there are 426 col- 
leges and universities in the United States with 
a total enrolment of 175,000. 

At Topeka, May 4, will occur the interstate 
oratorical contest. Kansas will be represented 
by Culbertson. of Emporia College. 

Pres. J. N Wilkinson, of the State Normal, 
has recently handed in his resignation to the 
Board of Regents of that institution. 

"Grandpa, did you like that gumdrop?" 
asked Willie. "Yes, I liked it very much 
Willie." "Well Towser didn't; he spit it out 
twice. 

Several of the smaller Michigan colleges have 
decided to allow their baseball men to play 
professional ball during the summer months. 
A good idea, as the men would probably play 
anyway. 

The literary societies at Cooper College are 
going to edit the next few numbers of the 
Cooler Courier. College Life, the college paper of 
the College of Emporia, is also being edited by 
the societies. 

The Great Sahara Desert, that land of 
mystery and silence, that inland ocean of sand, 
now belongs mostly to France, who proposes 
to open it up with railroad, telegraph and 
military posts. Some- artesian wells have 
already been dug. 



420 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



Ionian Society* 

The hall was well filled with lonians, brother 
Hamiltons, and visitors. An unusually good 
program was given. Hallie Smith, Edna 
Jones and Elsie Brown rendered pleasing in- 
strumental solos, after which the question 
"JtesofaetZ, That egg roasts are detrimental to 
College work" was warmly debated, Edith 
Foray the leading the affirmative and Marion 
VanLiew the negative side. The judges de- 
cided in favor of the affirmative. 

The extemporaneous speaking, led by Ruth 
Cooley, was enjoyed by the society, as was 
also the recitation by Marie Bardshar's little 
sister. Mr. Farrar's novelty music was enter- 
taining as well as novel. An excellent number 
of the "Oracle" was edited by Charlotte Mor- 
ton, after which the society adjourned. 

Visitors are always welcome. B. M. N. 



Ag. Association, 

The correspondent has in mind the editor's 
request of last week that the society reports be 
entertaining. May we remind the worthy chief 
of Bill Nye's experience in the dark well, when 
he did not know how long he was in as he had 
no match to strike that he might look at his 
watch. Also, he had no watch. In the future 
the association will meet at 1:30 P. M. instead 
of 2:45. This change gives the agricultural 
students who have afternoon literary society 
work an opportunity to become members of the 
Ag. Association. We still have room for one 
or two, perhaps more, good members. Those 
wishing to gain a broader view of agriculture 
in general than is acquired by ordinary class 
work can ill afford to be non -members. Do 
not wait to be invited. All things may come 
to him who waits but . J. e. b. 



Alpha Beta Society. 

We are glad to announce that to-day our so- 
ciety was visited by several distinguished law- 
yers from various parts of the country. After 
some persuasion, they consented to entertain 
us (luring our session. They put forth B. S. 
Wilson, an impersonator, who gave us a bit of 
humor by detailing the facts of a divorce case. 
Wilson being a judge from an Arkansas court, 
was able to impersonate this special case in a 
manner quite true to life. We induced Oman, 
a lawyer from a southern state, to enter into a 
debate with Cassel, a representative of the 
North — question, "Hewlued, That small colleges 
are more beneficial than large ones," Oman 
insisted that a small college affords better ac- 
commodations to students because of the per- 
sonal work, better acquaintance with student 
body, and fewer social functions to detract 



from lessons. Cassel argued that a large col- 
lege offers a better and more complete course, 
more apparatus is furnished, better work is re- 
quired, there are more beneficial organizations 
in connection with a large college, and that 
students show their interest in school by the 
class spirit and enthusiasm which they display. 
Then M. G. Smith, a man from St. Louis, 
talked to us awhile. He told us some of his 
experiences and great responsibilities in keep- 
ing things running like clockwork during the 
World's Fair. He was employed as a guard, 
but engaged most of the time in answering 
questions— put by the women. Anna Tolin re- 
viewed "The Crisis" to us, and well did she do 
it, for she was personally acquainted with the 
leading characters of the story. She pictured 
Abraham Lincoln so vividly that we thought 
we really saw him, Dora Harlan, editorof that 
well-known paper, "The Gleaner," is out on an 
advertising trip, and happened to be with us 
to-day. That we might become interested in 
her paper and therefore subscribe for it, she 
begged leave to read us a sample copy. It was 
enjoyed by all and she took a number of sub- 
scriptions. Between speeches we had music* 
furnished by Bernice Deaver, President Math- 
erly, Miss Lane, and Miss Jones. E. a. 



Eurodelphians. 

The program for the day was a Eugene Field 
program. The first number was a very good 
violin solo by Eleanor March. Helen Huse 
gave an autobiography of Eugene Field, after 
which Zola Walton recited one of his poems, 
"The Child* 1 Letter." Aline Robidoux gave 
one of his prose writings. Etta Carlton intro- 
duced Edna Jones, who played a piano solo. 
Miss McKeen gave the noted poem, "Wynken 
and Blynken and Nod." Another prose read- 
ing was given by Grace Smith. The program 
was ended by an excellent paper on Field's 
works, by Arthie Ed worthy. w. A. D. 



The f 06 Banner 
$1,25 

PLUS POSTAGE 



Manhattan, 



F, A, KENE, 



*w 



*v 



Kansas 






jawammw^m 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



421 




E. A. Morgan does not expect to graduate 
this year. 

F. W. Grabendike went to ehui*eh last Sun- 
day night. 

James A. Lupfer made a hit on the way home 
from the lake. 

R. D. Harrison is a specialist along the line 
of electric bells. 

E. A. Cowl e s took supper on top of the water 
tank the other evening. 

Miss Nellie fainter visited with her brother 
.T. W. Painter last week. 

The baseball team won its seventh consecu- 
tive victory, last Friday. 

"Banty" Williams showed his father around 
C College one day last week. 

Carrol Walker was on his best behavior last 
week. His father was here. 

Miss Erqhardt, a former student here, was 
seen around College last week. 

A. D. Holloway enjoyed a visit from his 
mother for a few days last week. 

Squire Watkins attended the Odd Fellows' 
convention at Anthony last week. 

Mr. Garver, of Abilene, visited with his son 
James Wednesday and Thursday. 

Mrs. Bardsbar, of Mount Hope, spent a few 
days with her daughter Marie last week. 

Isn't it strange how many different ailments 
the students fell victim to last Thursday? 

C asset and Groome were called into the 
country last week to do veterinary work. 

BYed Hauser showed, some of his friends from 
home about Eureka Lake last Thursday. 

Miss TJolfie Urkhart, from Wamego, visited 
friends in Manhattan during the last week. 

Assistant Melick was lost one day last week 
in the physics building hunting for room A 63. 

Miss Nellie Rickman was escorting a young 
lady friend, from Topeka, around College last 
week. 

Grabendike is approaching his second child- 
hood for he was seen riding on the merry-go- 
round. 

Bosooe was reinstated last week with the 
understanding that henceforth he was to be a 
good dog. 

Several rooms inhabited by students are 
decorated with flags obtained at the lake last 
Thursday * 



The Coops, are thinking seriously of chal- 
lenging Ottawa to a game of baseball in the 
near future. 

Milo Hastings wishes to announce that he 
will have his hair cut as soon as the track sea- 
son is over. 

The fair senior girl who says she's "got it 
down pat 1 ' proved it by "doing it up brown" 
last Thursday. 

McKamey and Potter were among the lucky 
ones who succeeded in getting a boat at the 
lake Thursday. 

Putnam's brother, down at K. tT., raises his 
record in the hammer throw every time he gets 
time to practice. 

Marion Vanliiew, who starred in the recent 
fo. play, was ill with nervous prostration a 
few days last week. 

Fres. E, R. Nichols inspected the K. S. A. C. 
"army," last Saturday, and found them to be 
in flrst-class condition. 

Don M. Neer writes from Winslow, Ariz., 
that he is employed with the Civil Engineering 
Department of the Santa Fe. 

The appearance of an A. B. behind the 
scenes during the Ionian play caused much 
consternation among the Hamps. 

Kiene tested the resistance of a body moving 
down an inclined plane at K. IT., last week, by 
sliding down the chapel steps there. 

The baseball team will start on another trip 
next Monday. They will play two games; one 
with Washburn' and the other with the Emporia 
Normals. 

It is reported that Doctor Schoenleber made 
a visit to the College some time last week. The 
materia medica students are always glad to 
welcome the Doctor on his rare visits here. 

The West Side Forestry Club, of Topeka, 
visited the Co liege Thursday. The senior D. 
S. girls served them with a three-course dinner. 
Professor Dickens lectured to the club on for- 
estry. 

Professor Woods to a student in one of his 
chemistry classes: "Who first discovered po- 
tassium V" Then, encouragingly, "He lived a 
hundred years ago, didn't you know him?' 1 
She blushed. 

The "set-ein-ups" club, consisting of 
"Swud," "Jorgy," "Hiram," "Hillman," 
"Kahl" and Coxen, meet regularly now at 
Garver's, Wednesdays and Fridays, A 25 cent 
treat will admit any engineer to the organiza- 
tion. 

Miss Rice was unable to meet her classes 
several days last week on account of her eye. 
She mistook the carbolic acid bottle for the 
witch hazel bottle and put a drop of the acid 
into her eye. The doctor says it will not be 
serious, however. 

By competent authorities it is estimated that 
our team, by the victories won on the trip, 
increased our attendance here for next year by 
200, raised our reputation 100 per cent, and 
added a value to the school of not less than 
$50,000. It pays to have a good team. 



422 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



| NEW CLOTHING 



NEW SHOES 
NEW HATS 






J 



Meet our 
Tailor 



NKW GOODS arriving daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: " :* '• '•'• 

JOHN COONS, of Course 



WalkOrer 
Shoes 



i 



The "Dump" had it's picture taken last 
week. 
"Hurrey" next Sunday. 
A. B. Nystrom's sister visited him last week. 

C. D. Hurrey will speak at the Congregational 
church next Sunday afternoon. 

The assistant marshal of the junior class has 
moved back to the "Center." 

Whiit do you think of our relay team? 

Itink Payne has moved up to the "Dump." 

The Hort. Department has fitted up all their 
spray machinery and commenced spring work. 

Askren, the graduate optician. Glasses 
scientifically fitted. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

F. A. Barnett wishes to announce to the girl 
that made Boseo's hat, that she can have him. 

Watches, jewel rv, silverware and hand- 
painted china at Askren's. The largest assort- 
ment in Manhattan. 

Pelham has been having hard luck, but he 
bucked up courage enough to take his lady to 
the bonfire last Wednesday night. 

P. A. Graham, C. I. Weaver and L. R. 
Elder have "accepted" positions with the 
4 {General Electric Co.," at Schenectady, N. Y. 

Manager Dean is trying to arrange for an- 
other baseball game with K. U M to be played 
here some time this season. ^ The re is also 
some talk of meeting them on a^track meet. 



Did you notice "Mike" pulling grass at the 
game with Ottawa? 

Bunn Thurston wishes us to announce that 
he beat Stauffer one fifth second in the half- 
mile run Monday. 

President Murlin. of Baker University, was 
elected constable of Baldwin, through the in- 
fluence of the students. 

Even a senior knows how to economize. L. 
R. Elder was seen walking through the mud, 
Monday night, carrying his shoes. 

Miss A: "Don't you think Professor Valley 
is dignified?" Master Krudop: "I don't know 
as he is so dignified, but he's awful big." 

"Van" promised to shave off half his whisk- 
ers if our boys won all the games on the trip. 
If you don't believe he kept his promise just 
look at his face. 

The Farm Department has received twenty 
different kinds of alfalfa seed from the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. These samples 
were collected from all over the world. 

The College is installing a tile drainage 
system in the field west of the domestic science 
building. The draw is to be filled up and the 
field made considerably better looking. 

Prof. Albert Dickens was in his glory last 
Thursday. The Women's Forestry Club met 
here and the Professor proudly led them over 
the campus, forgetting all about his rules laid 
down to the students about keeping off the 
grass. 



Y/ADNEV'C RflfWCTHDE Headquarters for College Texl-Books 
T AlVll CI J DUUlW 1 UK C and College Supplies of all Kinds 



Spalding's Line of Baseball and Sporting Goods 
Eastman's Kodaks and Camera Supplies - ' 
Brownie Kodaks Only $1 and $2 
Keuffel & Ksser Line of Drawing Tools and Material 



Prices Guaranteed as low as the lowest 



31 1 Poyntz Avenue 



: 



- 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



423 



WE WILL GIVE AWAY FREE 



A Ma gnificant Trophy Cu p 

i - — -- 

■ - ^ ■ — — ■ — . — ^— ___ 

To the member of the K. S. A. C. baseball team who has the highest batting average. 
We carry the most complete line of Baseball and Tennis Goods in the city and invite 
comparison. OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT. 

ANDERSON'S BOOKSTORE 



L. E. Gaston, the detective. 

Coxen is the regular Herald reporter. 

Straw hats are going to be worn some this 
spring. 

By arrangement the Herald "will be one day 
late this week. 

Fine watch and jewelry repairing at Ask- 
ren's, the jeweler. 

Geo. Griffith was taken home by his father 
on account of sickness. 

Go to Orr's Studio for colored postal cards 
of College. Finest in town. 

Prof. O. Erf went to Haskell Institute, last 
Tuesday, to deliver a lecture. 

Mr. R. E. Stotts, of Garden City, spent a 
few days with friends in Manhattan. 

Boscoe has been given new colors by the 
Rooters' Club, as his old ones were lost at 
K. U. 

Allen Phillips says he will not drill his 
senior year unless he gets to be color- sergeant 
or second lieutenant. 

The most spectacular thing at the meet last 
Monday was the junior relay team. Extra 
blankets were required for them when they 
finished. 

One of the assistants was seen swiping lilacs 
from the campus. He had better watch out or 
Professor Dickens will make him drop the 
course— Zee! 

Miss Stella Campbell and Mr. McLean at- 
tended the annual students' volunteer conven- 
tion held at Lawrence last week. The conven- 
tion meets at Baldwin next year. 

L. E. Gaston, first lieutenant, general and 
boss over the gun-cleaning squad at the Ar- 
mory, was taken for a detective -by some vis- 
itors last week, on account of his piercing eye 
and stealthy tread. Their fear was not over- 
come until assured that he was perfectly harm- 
less. 

The freshman professional baseball team de- 
feated the Clay Center high school team last 
week. The features of the game-were "Puzzle" 
Jones' playing and the gate receipts. "Dob- 
ber" was objected to by the Clay Center team 
on account of having pitched professional ball 
last summer. 



Overheard at the Baker game: "Say, you 
fellow on second base, did you put up alTthe 
horses, cows and pigs before you left Man- 
hattan?" "B:" "Yes, but I guess I left one 
of the asses out." 

Coach Melick officially announces that from 
the following list of names the team of fifteen 
men who will take part in the meet at Topeka, 
will in all probability be picked: Edelblute, 
Cain, Watkins, Oskins, Seng, .Farrar, Milli- 
gan, Hastings, Schroeder, Stauffer, Thurston, 
Jones, Carr, Bealey, Birch, Ferris, Lawson, 
Putnam, and Nyberg. No place on the team 
is cinched, however, and all positions on the 
team are yet open to contest. It is hoped that 
mid-term exams, will not barr any of these 
men from taking part in the future meets. 

rr..i< ' . * • —. ■ . - ■ ■ ' 




It wouldn't 
be summer 
without 
Blue Serge 

IJ No one need be with- 
out a Blue Serge Suit. 
They are all the rage, 
more than ever this 
season. The most pop- 
ular are 32- and 33-inch 
long at $12, $13.50, $15, 
$16.50, $18, and $20. 
Every size. New Ox- 
fords for Ladies and 



Copyright 1906 
B. Kuppenhalmer A, Co. UentlCmeil. 
Chicago 



E L Knostman s 



424 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



New and «T 
School Book* 



Spectacles 
Gold Pens 



R. E. LOFINCK 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICK. * College Supplies, Notions anil 
Spotting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Minnie Deibler, '05, is at home after a win- 
ter's teaching at Formosa. 

Mrs. Miriam (Swingle) Joss, 'OH, of Tacoma, 
Wash., is visiting her parents west of the Col- 
lege. 

Jessie Sweet, '05, who has been teaching 
school near Glasco, returned home the first of 
the week. 

Louis P. Brous, '8ft, of Old Mexico, lectured 
to Professor Kammejer's economics class last 
Saturday morning. 

Margaret Lot! nek, freshman last year, visited 
with home folks last week. She is clerking in 
a department stord in Topeka. 

Benoni Hoffhines, student last year, was 
about College last week. He is in the real es- 
tate and insurance business in Marquette. 

Nellie Baird, '05, came down from Marquette, 
and after attending the exercises at the lake 
last Thursday visited friends in Manhattan, 



Come see our team clean up the Normals 
Saturday. 

Torje Carlson was called home Tuesday on 
account of his father's illness. 

Our team appreciate the kindness siiown to 
them by Skinner, '04, while at K. IT. 

The Girls' Hooters' Club gave the Baker boys 
and our team a reception, Tuesday night. 

Even rabbits are interested in baseball. 
They have appeared as s[*eetators at our last 
two games. 

The freshies and also members of other 
classes have begun their botany held work, to 
all appearances. 

Did you witness the paying of a bet the 
other morning? Sewell pushed Barber to 
school in a wheelbarrow. 

The hockey season at the Ontario Agricul- 
tural College has just finished and their 
opponents, the Bankers, won the cup from 
thein. 

A senior's attempt at poetry : 

While sitting at my table 

With pencil in my hand. 

My intentions were to write as I am able 

And to sell what views I can. 

If agents to get were as easy 
As people to bite on our views. 
I'd get so rich on the profit 
Why. I'd have piles of chink to lose. 

Evidently the author was an agent for stere- 
opticon views. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



SUBSCRIBE FOB 

THE HERALD 

$1 per year, 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. X- X> 

W, M, STINGLEY & CO. 

GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths 1W one dollar. Fine line or cijrars unci toilet 
articles. Razors boned, 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 

113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Hank HuiJdinjr. 

Porcelain bath tubs tine line cigars and toilet articles 



p 



I 



I 
I 



U 



71 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

. . Candies . . 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



±L 



Phone 167 




We Sell 

THE BEST 



TF 



All Kinds of — 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



F 



■ ' Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 

ountain. ice cream sodas 



I 
I 



J 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



f 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. <fl If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
Ifl Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. 1& Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 
Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 
12i:i Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drunim Street. 



General Offices: 
TJ Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

21H MeDermet Avenue 








ur Young Men's Suits 



WE TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Clothes for the Young Man from 16" to 20 years of age. Our suits 
have the desired amount of style in cut and make-up, while the fabrics 
are the most appropriate. We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we have made ready for them. - 

You'll Find Our Suits Different 

They are $10.00. $12.50. $15.00. $18.00. $20.00 and $22.00. 



"\ 



I W. S. ELLIOT 



312 

POYNTZ 

AVE. 



i 








We Have Just Received 

Another shipment of the very latest styles in BELTS, including the 
Gold and Silver and the latest fads in Leather. Our line is complete, styles 
correct, prices small. A big showing in Wash Belts, including the*" Alice 
Longworth." Six attractive styles at 10 cents. 

Our stock of BAGS includes the new shapes in Leather and White 
Canvas. They are well made, with strong frames. Prices 25 cents and up 

The quality and extra high finish of our BACK- and SIDE=COMBS is well 
known. The line oi Fancy Combs is now ready, and verv attractive at 25 
cents to 98 cents. 

The 

Big Racket 





pwfflfcg**: ™'3£w3E 



V 



^^ 



^1 * 

IChe Students' Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X, 





■ 






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- 



■ I J 

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' &*■ 






IsV 

■fiat" 



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I 

■ 

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. 



FOUR CENTS MORE FOR NO. 1 CREAM 

THAN FOR NO. 2 



Tim creameries of Ihe country 
have become so oonvlnoed of the 
Increased value of thick cream 
over thin cream that many of 
them are paying a premium on 
cream containing 8D per cent or 
more hotter fat over that con- 
taining under SO per cent. 

One of the largest buyers of 
cream in the West, the-Hanford 
Produce Co., of Sioux City, la., 
lamed in January the following 
statement to its cream shippers: 
"We are going to offer a pre- 
mium of 4 emit pw pound butter 
fat for what we term No. 1 
cream. Fibst-Gbiob cream 
shaU constat of all baud-separa- 
tor cream which to delivered at 
leant twice a week in winter 
and three times per week in 
summer, this cream to be de- 
livered reasonably sweet and 
testing so per cent or more, 
Ssoohd-Gbaos cream shall con- 
sist of all hand-separator cream 
delivered In good condition not 
lent than once a week or testing 
lest than 90 per cent.'' 



V 




Under these conditions cream- 
ery patrons should buy only the 
cream separator that 
a heavy ore am. The) 



UNITED STATES 

CREAM SEPARATOR 

sen skim a heavier cream than 
any other and do 11 without cloo- 
gtno. The TJ. S. has the record 
Of rfrtnmfrp; a cream testing M 
per cent. And remember also 
that the U. 9. holds the World's 
Record for clean skimming. It 

Sets the most cream and will de- 
ter as heavy a dream as you 
want. 

Write for a copy of oar One 
new ltw separator catalogue 
No, 178. It tells why the TJ. 3. 
can sldrn the f%rtt-urade cream : 
how It made the World's Record 
for clean »iriMtiititw g ^ many 
other things you should know 
before yon put any money into 
a cream separator. Write for a 
copy-*>day -do It now while you 
think of it. addressing. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., """Bft 



We probably have a selling agent in your vicinity, and if so, will give you his name when we send 
yon the catalogue. It to bis business to show yon a United States Separator if yon want to see one. 



ssSSSM 







Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



FOR 

Ictvcream and 
Icecream sodas 



GOTO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 



Sweep and Power Feed Hills. Disc Cultivators, Safety 

am Harvesters, Little Wonder Chums, Perfection 
wn S wings. Oak Stores, S ash W eights, Chimney Caps, 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs, Structural Iron Work, Stove Re- 

-:- *:- KANSAS 



MANHATTAN, 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing. 



5= 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 




Day an 
Meet an trains day or night, 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for sail 
gsmus, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. 



PHONE 65 



H. J. Barnhouse 



L W. Phillips 



/ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Can furnish you with your College supplies. KEUFFEL & 
ESSER Drawing Instruments, EUGENE DIETZGEN Drawing 
Material, WATERMAN'S IDEAL Fountain Pens. 

Special orders receive prompt attention. 



Up-to-date Stationery. 



cmrnc that 

OEEL/O GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry, 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons. 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NG'S 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

42 ENGEL BROTHERS 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 

and HARD and SOFT COAL. 
Phone 55 Phone 55 



ORR'S STUDIO 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Photo of any size or style. Souvenir Postal 

Cards of College and I. O. O. F. Home 

FOR SALE 

Subscribe for 

THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 



Senior Groups 



Basket-bail and all other 
groups will be ready in about 
a week. Leave your order 
for what you want. :i :: :: 



Wolf's Studio 



426 



THE STUDEMTS' HEKALD. 



TT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry-Goods 

Have you seen the 

Dainty Swiss Organdies that 

we are showing at 50e a yd.? 

Printed Organdies at 25c, yd. 

Dotted Swiss Muslins. 

Dresden Patterns at )5c. 

Rose Batiste at 15c. yd. 

New White Duck. 

HAND BAGS. 

WHITE KID BELTS 

with the new fastenings. 




Krippendorf-Dittmann Co's Ladies' 
Shoes. They are the best you can buy. 

Ladies' Gymnasium Slippers $1 & $1.35 
BASEBALL SHOES 



New Shirt- Waist Suits 
for Commencement. 

Dainty new graduation 

gowns beautifully made and 

trimmed. 

Dozens of different designs 
in white shirt-waists. 

Stylish white duck and linen 
skirts. 

Pongee and taffetta silk 
coats. 

New styles in caps. 

McCall patterns. JOc and 15c 
None higher. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part or the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry- Goods, Heady -to- wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 






IF YOU'RE THINK- 
ING WHY NOT ACT 




An Irishman once bought an owl, believing it to 
he a parrot, and a few weeks afterwards a friend 
inquired if the bird hod yet commenced to talk. 
"Faith, no," said Pat, "but he is keepin' up a devil 
of a tliinkin'." 

We are glad to have you think of our dry-goods, 
shoes and oxfords, ladies' and gents' furnishings, 
and can make a visit to our store profitable to you. 

MOORE BROS, & CO, 



Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Kirksville.Mo.. 
and late of the Treating Stan* of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free of charge. :: :: :: :: :: :: 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office. 134-2 

Bank Bldg.. Rooms 15-20. Res.. 134-3 



PROFEHSIONA L. 



DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room 18- Union National Bank Building 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc 5tuocnts Or The 
Kansas Statc Agricultural College 

Moiioth&EvetyOne CaltivateHis Own Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., May 10, 1906. 



Number 33 



Berkeley Students and the Earthquake. 

The following are verbatim extracts from 
letters received by Prof. Oortelyou from his 
youngest brother, a freshman at the University 
of California: {April 10) I have heard that 
Los Angeles is all in ruins and half burned up, 
but I don't believe it. Reports have it that 
every city in the U. S. is burning. 

(April 22) When the quake came we were all 
in bed but didn't stay there long. I thought 
sure this old shack would go. The shaking 
lasted an awful long time and it knocked over 
a chair and some books off the table. We 
didn't think much of that though and went 
back to bed. 

It wasn't till breakfast time that we heard 
about the damage of Oakland and Frisco. Im- 
mediately after breakfast we had government 
inspection of our regiment, and I wrote you 
how we got over to the city after lunch. (April 
li): After drill a few of us went to the city on 
a big bluff. The ferry people had orders not 
to let any one over to the city, but we had on 
our uniforms and organized a company and 
pretended we had been ordered over for ser- 
vice.) The sight we saw was terrible. The ferry 
building was the only one left standing along 
the water front — everything else was smoking 
ashes. . . . There was no checking the lire. 
A strong wind was fanning it and there was ab- 
solutely no water except what could be pumped 
from the bay, and every tug and engine was do- 
ing its utmost. . . . Confusion and terror 
reigned. Gangs of toughs broke into saloons 
before the fire reached them and drank all they 
could. Drunks were lying around everywhere, 
dead to the world. I don't know how many of 
them escaped before the oncoming, roaring 
flames. 

That night the city was put under martial 
law and we were ordered to report in the arm- 
ory at Berkeley at nine o'clock. We ran over 



a m»le through the fire lines and came here and 
just missed the fellows going over. 

That night Frisco looked like the crater of 
a huge volcano. Great masses of flame-lit 
smoke were piled over the doomed city, and 
broad sheets of flame wavered high in the air. 
And all this was reflected from the bay, only 
slightly roughened by the winds. 

Next morning we reported for duty at the 
armory and went over at about eleven. The, 
city was burning wildly that morning. The 
water was not on yet and the dynamite was all 
gone. More dynamite arrived that afternoon 
and that was all that saved any of the town. 

Our company was marched out to the head- 
quarters of the 3rd battalion in the residence 
section of the middle class of the people, and 
there we were put on guard duty. We had full 
power over all police, and bad orders to break 
up and close all saloons and shoot without 
warning any one caught looting. No fires or 
lights were permitted except in the streets. 

Closer to the Are lines, where the regulars 
were stationed, there was a good deal of loot- 
ing, and lots of looters were shot down or 
hung. Grocery stores did a big business and 
were soon sold out. Some of them tried to raise 
their prices, but we confiscated their goods and 
gave it away to the hungry people. 

I cannot describe the pitiful sights of seeing 
people burned out of their houses with every- 
thing gone and friends and relatives dead, of 
people— women and children— plodding along 
and ready to drop from exhaustion and sor- 
row. 

The fellows worked hard and well and did 
lots of good. The people over in the city think 
we are just about right. We had good grub, 
considering, and a fair place to rest. They 
worked us too hard though. The regulars and 
militia had three reliefs and we had only two, 
so each sentinel had mighty hard work. 



428 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Thousands of homeless are in Oakland and in 
Berkeley. The campus and buildings are full. 
The co-eds. are doing great work on the relief 
corps. 

Last night our regiment was moved from 
Frisco hack here to Berkeley, and our guard 
duty will be easy now. Tuesday night at six I 
go on duty again. 

You can believe all you read in the L. A. 
Time* but nothing in the Examiner. 



After Graduation, What? 

Several cases of "After Graduation, What'?" 
are reported among the seniors. The writer's 
attack carae on one Sunday afternoon. Next 
morning the swelling of the cortex was very 
painful and, in hope of relief, the patient 
dragged himself to the Library, pulled out a big 
red book and began to read. The book was 
entitled, "Who's Who in America," and con- 
tained biographies of 16.000 living Americans. 

People who are not named in the "Red Book*' 
like to insinuate that the folks mentioned pay 
for their write-ups the same as a senior pays 
for his photo in a class book. The writer does 
not know anything about the business manage- 
ment of "Who's Who," but he does know that 
the book left an immense impression on his 
mind as to the amount of work necessary to be- 
come the sixteen thousandth American, count- 
ing from the top downward. Moreover, this 
book entirely removed the unpleasant symptoms 
referred to above, and for this reason I give 
the following facts for the beniflt of classmates 
who have not time to read the original work. 

Of about one thousand graduates from K. S. 
A. C. the following are all whose names I have 
found listed in the big "Red Book" of living 
immortals: Samuel Wendell Williston, '72, 
professor oi paleontology, Chicago Univer- 
sity; Julius T. Willard, '8.1, professor of 
chemistry, K. S. A. C; Charles L. Marlatt, 
'84, entomologist, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture: 
Mark A. Carleton, '87, cerealist, U. S. Dept. 
of Agriculture: Ernest F. Nichols, '88, profes- 
sor of experimental physics, Columbia Univer- 
sity; Walter T. Swingle, MM), plant physiolo- 
gist, IT. S. Dept. of Agriculture; Frank Albert 
Waugh, '01, professor of horticulture, Agri- 
cultural College of Massachusetts; William 
Logan Hall, '08, forester, U. S. Dept. of 
Agriculture. 

In justice to our school it should be remarked 
that over one-half our graduates have been 
turned out in the last ten years, while the aver- 
age age of the "Who's Who" list is fifty-three. 
That it should take a man thirty years to con- 
vince the world of something he already knows 
is a rather discouraging fact and inclines the 



senior to the idea of going back to the farm 
and sitting on the fence to watch the crops grow. 
The only difficulty is that some of us have no 
fence on which to sit. M. M. H. 



Chicago Alumni Reunion. 

The second annual dinner of K. S. A. C. 
alumni of Chicago took place on April 21 at the 
Saratogo hotel. The guests began to arrive at 
six o'clock and continued for two hours, while 
the parlors were the scene of greetings and re- 
calling of experiences Itetween old friends, 
many of whom had not seen each other for 
years. Most of the classes from '67 to '05 were 
represented. 

The assembly now paused long enough in 
the renewing of old friendships and the mak- 
ing of new ones to elect the following officers 
for this year: President, J. V. Patten, '05: secre- 
tary-treasure, K. H. Freeman, '05. The dinner 
and conversation which followed the blessing 
by Reverend Milner supplied all that was lack- 
ing to place all in the proper humor to enjoy 
the toasts and program which followed. 

President Robertson introduced Dr. S. W. 
Williston as toastm aster and presented him 
with a gavel made especially for the occasion. 
the head from oak taken from the old College 
building on College hill, and the handle from 
an osage orange tree that had been planted 
by one of the old professors. Doctor Williston 
left us with no doubt that our College the 
first of several he had been connected with 
has the first place in his memory. Kdwin A. 
Munger in telling "That Reminds We" found 
himself back at the old College barn "currying 
bulls." He spoke encouragement for the boy 
or girl working his way and assured them of 
the help of the Chicago alumni for the new 
graduate. Miss Madeleine Milner gave "From 
Kansas," an apt parody on one of Walt. Whit- 
man's selections. At this point everybody 
was in a mood to enjoy a vocal solo by Miss 
Henrietta Hofer, rendered as only Miss Hofer 
can, and of course she had to respond to a 
hearty encore. "Reciprocity Among Colleges" 
was the subject of a toast by Geo. M. Logan. 
He spoke particularly of how important it is 
that each alumnus use every possible oppor- 
tunity to help the College in obtaining that re- 
cognition to which it is entitled. Raymond H, 
Pond, in telling us "How an alumnus can help 
his Alma Mater," said we should encourage 
original investigation and research and that 
good scholarship should not be sacrificed for 
practical education. Two saxophone solos by 
L. B. Bender, '(M, were next, and were very 
much appreciated. Miss Myrtle Mather, '02, 
was called on and gave an account of some of 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



429 



the work she is doing" in domestic science. The 
value of the course of study for girls at the 
College was made clear. Next was some more 
vocal music hy Mrs. lone (Dewey) Souther- 
land. It was necessary to send for more music 
before we would allow her to stop. The as- 
sociation was fortunate in having President 
Nichols as an unexpected guest. With many 
stories, in his pleasing way, he told us the 
things the College is doing, and made us feel 
that his heart was in his work. After all had 
sung "Alma Mater," presidentelect. J. V. Pat- 
ten, gave a strong talk on "College Enthusi- 
asm," reiterating the sentiment that we alumni 
feel the strongest kind of interest in the new 
graduate. Professor Sparks, of the Iowa State 
College, and Reverend Milner were each called 
on and gave short talks. After "Auld Lang 
Syne" and last hut not least the "College 
yell," this joyful occasion ended. 

The following were present; Kate E. (White) 
Turley, '71, S. W. Williston, '72, D. G. Robert- 
son, '80, W. E. Whaley, »86, S. N. Peck, '87, 
Lora (Waters) Beeler, '88, C. E. Freeman, '8*t, 
E. T. Martin, '90, Grant Dewey, '1)0, Madeleine 
W. Milner, '91, lone (Dewey) Southerland, '93, 
J. W. Evans, M. D., '94, J. V. Patten, '95, 
Hortense (Harman) Patten, '95, Mabel (Crump) 
MeCauley, '9. r >, E. H. Freeman, '95, A. C. Peck, 
»98, Raymond H. Pond, '98, H. D. Orr, M. D., 
'99, W. F. La wry, '00, M. Margueret Mather, 
'02, Geo. M. Logan, '02, Henrietta M. Hofer, 
'02, Clara Goodrich, '03, Raymond G. Lawry, 
'03, R. T. Kersey, '04, E. C. Gardner, '04, 
L. B. Bender, '04, Harry P. Hess, '05, C. P. 
Rlachly, '05, Olive B, Dun lap, '05, Geo. Wolf. 
'05, C. A. Hite, '05, Mrs. B. (White) Shirley, 
Mr. Thomas Shirley, Misses Abbott, Mrs. D. 
G. Robertson, Elmer House, Mrs. Elmer House, 
Charles H. MeCauley, Mrs. Geo. Evans, Mrs. 
Henrietta (Evans) Wakelield, Geo. F. Dewey, 
Mrs. G. F. Dewey, Mrs. Grant Dewey, Edwin 
A. Munger, Miss Gardner, M. D., Reverend 
Milner, Mrs. S. W. Williston, G. W. Beeler, 
Mrs. 8. N. Peck, Mr. H. A. Root, Z. T. Turley, 
Pres. E. R. Nichols, and Professor Sparks, of 
Chicago University. 



AT. S. A. C. /, K. S. N. 0. 

Those who went to Athletic Park last Satur- 
day expecting to see a walk-away were disap- 
pointed. Instead of seeing the Normal defeated 
by a very large score, they saw the closest 
game of the season. It was not the best game 
of the season, however, for things seemed to 
drag nearly all the time. The Normal team 
lost their third pitcher at the last moment, so 
Ray Singleton, their right fielder and a former 
K. S. A. C. student, was put in the box. He 



doesn't claim to be a pitcher, but he did good 
work. The farmers landed on him for eight 
safe ones, but they were badly scattered. His 
fine support also helped him out. Fury was in 
the box for the College, and his work was very 
effective. Only one lonely hit was secured by 
the teachers, and not a one walked. 

Things started in the first inning with a 
couple of errors by our boys, which allowed 
O' Conner to get to second. He couldn't ad- 
vance, however, and this was the Normal's 
nearest chance for a score. 

In the second inning Cave got a two-bagger, 
but the next two men up failed to hit, so he 
couldn't score. In the fourth Al. Strong got a 
pass to first, and again Cave did his part by 
getting a single. The others couldn't connect, 
however, so the side was retired with the score 
still to 0. 

In the sixth inning Al. Strong made another 
attempt to score, but failed. He got a single 
and went to third on Ma lion's two- bagger, hut 
again Singleton's pitching was effective and 
the farmers went out. In this inning Yount 
secured the Normal's only hit, but it was of no 
use. In the eighth inning Al. Strong again 
startled things by knocking a three* bagger to 
center field. Then on Cave's third hit he came 
home with the run that won the game. 

In the field the Normal boys did the better 
work. They used their heads, and only one 
error was marked against them. Had they 
been able to secure any hits off of Fury's pitch- 
ing they would probably have won the game. 
They are the j oiliest and best-natured bunch of 
players that has appeared at Athletic Park this 
season. It is certainly a pleasure to see a team 
that can play ball without chewing the rag. 

The score: 

K. S. A. C. AB B B HH PO A B 

H. Strontr. If 4 1 

Cimnimrhum. m 4 2 2 

Al. Strong of » 1 2 1 

Million. 8b 4 1 3 

nave M) 4 3 ° 2 - s 

Miller, c .'::.:..: »■ 6 • • I 1 • 

Porter, rf 3 2 

Huynes. lb 4 ° ° ? '* ? 

Fufy, p 2 10 4 1 

' Totals 32 1 H 1 27 13 4 

K. S. N. AB B B HH PO A E 

Yonnt.ll 4 10 10 

BvESSk 4 3 

O'ConDer.c 4 4 

Brennnn.Sb 3 ® n 5 3 1 

Qigt lb 3 9 

Funston.Jb. - » 2 2 

Hill cf 3 10 

R. Stmcieton. l» 5 000*30 

W. Singleton, rf 3 

Totals 30 1 24 11 I 



Teacher: What two chemical changes did 
Lot's wife undergo? Pupil: She turned to 
rubber and then turned to salt. 



430 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Official Score Interctass Field Meet. 



Event. 



100-yd. dash 

Pole vault 

Shot nut 

I -ii lilf run 

Broad j ump. ... 

220-yd. dash 

130-yd. hurdle... 
Hammer throw 

440-vd. dash 

Hitch jump 

Half-mile run... 
Discus throw.. . 
220-yurrt hurdle, 
2-mile run 

1-mile relay 



First. 



(Tie) Bflelblute. TO 

CIie)Oskfns,08 

Seng, 'o». 

Millitfan. '09 

Watkins. 06. ....... 

Cain. 07 

Sehroeder. '06 

Seng. "(H» 

MilliiftiD. "09 

Watkins. "Ott 

Thurston. '06 

Sent,'. '09 

Carr.'OH 

Bealy.06..... 

Curr.'oo i 

Nyberg. 09 e 1 

Millitfiin. '09 

Edelblute, "09 



Record. 



I0i see 

9.4 ft. 

81.8 ft 

4 in. hH J sec. . 

18.S5 ft 

24? sec 

20-! sec 

88.8 ft 

55 see 

r> f t. 3 in 

2 m. f6| see. . 

97 ft. 2 in 

301 see 

11 m. 52jt sec. 



Second. 



(Tie) Cain, '07 

(Tie) Wat kins, 08 

Karrar. 07 

Hastings. '08 

Oskins/08 

Edelblute. *0B 

Nyberg. 09 

Farrar. '07 

Cain. "07 

Oskios. '06 

Stauffer, "07 

Sehroeder. '08 

Sehroeder. 06 

Birch. 06 

f Thurston, '08 

1 Hastings, '08 

i Davis. '(16 

i Shuler.'OB 



Record. 



10? see 

9.4ft 

33.7 ft 

4 m, 573 sec. 

18.5 ft 

243 sec 

81 sec 

88 ft 

57 sec 

5 ft. 2 in .... 
2 m. 163 sec. 
85ft. II in ... 

Slj sec 

11 in. 53£ sec 



Third. 



Jones, '06, 
Anderson, "08. 
Putnam, '08. 
StaulTer. *07, 
Nyberg. '09. 
Shuler. 06. 

Putnam. 08. 

Jones, 06. 

Ferris, '08. 

Hastings, '08 

Farrar. '07. 

Bruer. '09. 

Neiman. '09. 
I Adams, "07. 
! Montgomery. *07. 
! Whipple. '07, 
i Shattuck. '07. 



Our Chances at the State Meet. 

Hastings is collecting the athletic records of 
the schools of the State which are to be rep- 
resented in the State meet at Topeka, May IS, 
If all these records can he secured they will he 
used to compile a record which, in the absence 
of a State meet in the past, may be considered 
as the State record up to the present time. 

Without attempting to give out inside in- 
formation, Hastings ventures the following 
general review of the chances of the home team 
at Topeka : 

K. V. not being in the meet, K. H. A. C. has 
an excellent chance to win first place. The 
College of Kmporia seems to be our most 
formidable rival. Marple, weight man, and 
Bigger, jumper and hurdler, will probably 
take several firsts, and if these men have good 
hacking in the other events they will stand an 
excellent chance of carrying home the honors 
of the first State meet. 

The Normal team has just won a closely con- 
tested meet with Baker, capturing all the runs. 
They have one sprinter that will set the farmers 
a faster pace than they have been accustomed 
to, otherwise the teachers seem slower than 
last year and need give us no grave concern. 

Baker, although they scored (Hi points against 
the Normal, seems to be wholly without stars, 
and in a meet with eight schools will not make 
much of a score. 

Fairmount is an old hand at track athletics, 
holding records superior to K. U. in some of 
the runs. Their records for this year are not 
available, but being a small school it is not 
probable that they will win better than third 
place. 

Washburn is a tenderfoot at track work and 
will make their first appearance on our path 
next Saturday. 

Ottawa and St. Mary's are small schools 
without much experience in track work. 



K, S. A. ('. men have not had the experience 
and training necessary to develop stars in 
hammer throwing, hurdling, and similar 
events. If we win at Topeka it will be by 
straight running. We have one distance 
runner that can run rings around any man 
that is now in sight in the State; hut one man. 
especially in long runs, cannot win a meet. 

We have a number of excellent runners, but 
with seven other schools in the game cannot 
expect to land every thing. A conservative 
estimate would place the farmers not lower 
than second at Topeka, while hard work and 
good backing should make it first. 



Normal Game Not Finished. 

After having had several pretty bad exper- 
iences with umpires while away from home this 
season, the limit was reached at Kmporia Mon- 
day when Mit Wilhite tried to give the game to 
the State Normal team. The College boys 
played about the poorest game of the season, 
and even at that they played big rings around 
the teachers. 

The game started out with our team at the 
hat. Al. Strong got to first on an error, but 
was not advanced. The Normals went out in 
one, two, three order. In the second inning 
Miller got to first on an error, stole second" 
went to third on another error, and scored on 
Porter's sacrifice. The Normal got a man on 
first in this inning, but a double play retired 
him. In the third, Kahl started things with a 
three-bagger. Then on the first chance, a 1 ittle 
infield hit, he started home and was easily- 
caught at the plate. In the fourth inning Mal- 
lon got a hit, and went to second on Cave's 
bunt. Then the pitcher, in trying to throw him 
out, hit him on the shoulder-blade, and Mallon 
had to quit the game. Fury took his place in 
the box. 

The Normal scored first in the fifth inning on 



r* '" * " 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



431 



two errors, a stolen base, and a sacrifice. The 
College scored in the last of this inning on hits 
by Cave and Haynes and a sacrifice by Miller. 
The Normal secured their second score in the 
first half of the seventh. 

In the last of the seventh Herb Strong was 
at bat. Three balls were called on him, and 
then Singleton hit him with the ball. Herb 
started for first, but Wilhite wouldn't let him 
take it. Then the pitcher threw ball No. 4, but 
still Wilhite wouldn't let him go down, and 
our boys, not being willing to stand for such 
open robbery, left the field. The Normal re- 
fused to make any kind of a concession and 
would not pay their guarantee. 

Score by innings: 

k- s N 

6 

Batteries — Singelton and O'Conner: Mallon, 
Fury and Miller. 



K 

.0— 0-0-0-1-0-1=3 
,0—1 -0-0— 1— 0-*=2 



H 
9 



A D. 5. Outing. 

Last Monday fifty-two happy "home nursing" 
girls and others boarded the 6:25 train bound 
for our noted State capital. The jolly times 
began. Helen, as usual, was full of jumps, 
and couldn't keep quiet long enough to see the 
flower beds that Ethel kindly pointed out to 
her. The sounds of laughter and song kept the 
old car warm until we finally alighted at the 
little village of Topeka. 

Guided by the kind hand of Mrs, Calvin, we 
finally reached the Y. W. office without serious 
accident. Some of us poor mortals being 
furnished by such a length of strenuous journey, 
repaired to the Cremerie" to secure something 
to eradicate the vacuum. After waiting for 
them to buy the wheat, to mill the flour, and 
hake the bread, we Anally secured our much- 
looked- and longed-for breakfast. 

We next betook ourselves to view the object 
of our pilgrimage— Christ's Hospital. Being 
fortunate in the time we chose for out- 
visit, we were able to see a plaster cast put on 
a little boy's foot. The work was done so 
neatly and with such dispatch that all of us 
Teamed valuable lessons. We went through 
the building viewing the wards and operating 
rooms. Also, we had very practical and some- 
what personal demonstrations of the treatment 
of fainting patients. However, they all recov- 
ered without very much water and fanning. 

After going to our feed, we honored Wash- 
burn with our presence. No doubt Washburn 
was as pleased and edified as were we when the 
"Jewels flocked around us." Leastwise the 
cases seemed similar. Washburn's art gallery 
was very much appreciated, some of the china 
being very artistic and beautiful. In the Ob- 



servatory a gentleman was kind enough to per- 
mit us to poke our hats out of the way long 
enough to peep in the telescope and see four 
little spots on the sun. 

A trip to the State-house and shopping 
ended our little spree, and all of us that didn't 
get left came home tired, but happy, singing 

contentedly, "There's No Place Like Home." 
M. G, 

What the Hamps. Did. 

In the usual time, place, and manner, Presi- 
dent Davis called the society to order. After 
roll-call the society was led in devotion by 
"Papa. '' The ever-exeellent program followed. 
The first four numbers were music by the 
Pikers' Quartet, composed of Tinkham, Bealey, 
Foresman, and B. Pa inter. Brown gave us 
some very excellent spring poetry, which showed 
true Irish talent. The very interesting debate — 
"liexolred. That the Niagara Falls should be 
preserved"— followed. Martin and Oskins ap- 
peared on the negative and Painter and Norlin 
on the affirmative. After the fourth inning the 
thing was called off and the final score stood 
in favor of the negative. "The Modern Decla- 
ration of Independence," written by Fdwards, 
showed the inborn statesmanship present in the 
writer. Mr. J. C Cunningham, '(15, an old 
member, gave us a very interesting talk. After 
Adams had told us of the good and had points 
in our program, we had recess, followed by a 
lively business session which ended 
pleasure for the evening. 



H. T 



our 
H. 



Experiment in Domestic Science. 

Miss Rose, with seven members of the senior 
elective class in domestic science, has begun an 
experiment which is to be carried on for two 
weeks. The girls will prepare their meals in 
the D. S. laboratory, and an accurate account 
will be kept of everything used. The calorie 
value and nutritive ratio of the two -weeks' 
rations will be worked out. 

The object of the experiment is to determine 
what may be done in the line of cheap dietaries 
and still have plenty, and have it temptingly 
and well served. 

During the two weeks the subjects of the ex- 
periment have pledged themselves to live on 
schedule time, taking a certain amount of sleep 
and exercise. No experiment of this kind is 
on record, and the members of the class are 
interested in finding why we pay *2.75 for 
board and then have room for complaint be- 
cause things are not what we think we have a 
right to expect, while the boarding-house keep- 
ers declare they have no profit. Probably the 
reason is lack of economy and tact in prepara- 
tion and serving. 




4;J2 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Mott»: LCTCW 
0«t CwiTiv*TC Hi J 
Own Genii* *+■ 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in ' advance. 
Single copies. Hve cents, 

0. K. Whipple, '07 Editor-in-chief 

CIhovkh Kahl. '07 Business Manager 

Mav(.JRiffin(j. W Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08 Ivoeal Editor 

S. W. Citnninoham. *0M Exchange Editor 

H. K. Hillman. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. E. Bk'h'K. '08 Subscription Manager 

(} HACK HAWK INS. '081 . T^ocal Editors 

A.G. Phillips. '07 I Assoc. lk>c»j rxmors 

Elizabeth Swkkt, '04 Alumni Editor 

J as. R. Cox bn. '08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due anrl that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Mi. i y.Aiu-ri'H SwBBT. '04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., May 10, 1906 


1 




X EDITORIALS 


a: 


V*+>~*^V**»***^^"*^^^ 



In these times of great upheavals of state 
politics, we are thankful that the Herald can 
stand aloof and take no part in the turmoil. 



Nine victories in succession— an enviable 
record for our baseball team. Splendid sup- 
port by the students is just as enviable. We 
can be justly proud of the boys: they are of us 
and are represenative students. The results 
are not surprising. Clean athletics can only 
result in this way. It is worth supporting. " 



Dishonesty is a broader term than most of us 
imagine. We naturally suppose that the larger 
per cent of us are honest. Are we V Taking quiz 
paper is dishonest and positively injurious. 
Not that the State can't afford it, but that it 
weakens the fellow who takes it. Steal in g hats, 
rubbers, books, and umbrellas surely can't be 
a result of this small beginning, and yet it is of 
the same kind. This practice develops into a 
sort of mania: many fellows take more paper 



than they can use. That, in itself, seems strange. 
Cheating is dishonesty. Borrowing the other 
fellows physics problem is as bad. They tend 
to weaken character. It is dangerous to be 
liberal, to encourage a tendency that should 
be squelched. Re hanest with yourself and 
the rest of us. It pays. 



Suggested by Hurrey. 

The man who didn't hear Hurrey last Sunday 
missed an inspiration. He is a man who ap- 
peals to college men— a man who would lead 
in any work. His challenge to the men was 
this: "You should get into Christian work be- 
cause it is best for you, and it is the tendency 
of the best men in all colleges. " He then named 
scores of men noted over the country for their 
prowess in college contests that are equally as 
interested in Christian work. Hogan and Bow- 
man, of Yale: Franz, of Harvard: Garten, of 
Wisconsin: Elliot, of Northwestern; Tener. of 
Ames: and scores of others. It is surely a 
great array of college men of prominence. 
Their religion is not a sanctimonious, pious, 
narrow kind, but wholesome and vigorous. 
President Roosevelt, when told of these men, 
said: "If these men are pushing this work, there 
will be surprising results in Christian work 
among college men in the next decade." It is 
true that there has been a change in college 
life even in the memory of some of us. Yost 
has said he will not have a man on his foot- 
ball team who swears. You say that is strange. 
Tt is just a natural law. A man who cannot 
control his temper cannot be successful in foot- 
ball. Yost ought to know. Christianity is a 
good proposition from a selfish standpoint. 
College men have begun to realize mora that it 
is practical and popular. Our colleges are 
products of a Christian civilization, and it is 
reasonable to expect this spirit to predominate. 
Mott, Speer. Col ton and Hurrey are good mod- 
els. Let's get in line and work with something 
of their zeal and follow the general tendency. 



Resolutions. 

Whereas, Death has removed from this life 
the beloved father of our classmate, T. Carl- 
son, be it 

Bemhed, That we, the class of 'Oft, extend to 
Mr. Carlson our heartfelt sympathy in this 
dark hour of trial: and be it further 

liemlred. That a copy of these resolutions be 

printed in the Students' Herald. 

C I. Weaver, 

A. C. Ferris, 

F. E. Brown, Com. 

'Tis strange what a man may do, and a 
woman yet think him an angel."— Thackeray. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



433 



Music Recital, 

Wednesday, May 16, lAOfl, at 8 p. m , College 
Auditorium. 
Selection 



Piano. 



Piano. 



ORCHKHTRA. 

Day of Sunshine Hennes 

RUTH TAYLOR. 

Vocal (») Sin* Me to Sleep tireene 

(b) An Episode Lohr 

A. G. PHILIPS. 

, Helene Wollenhaupt 

GRACB CHHLKTKNSKN. 

(iuttav (a) (lypsie Schottische Partee 

(b) La Vere Walt?. Cuckert 

HKLKN WEWHiATE. 

piano .Lurline Seeling 

BLSIK BKOWN. 

Vocal Sonn of the Hybrias the Cretan Elliott 

BARKY B. PiJRTKR. 

piano Valse E. Minor Chopin 

KUGKN1A PAIRMAN. 

Violin 6th Air Varfe DeBeriot 

MARY LANE. 

piano <&) Impromptu Seelintr 

(b) Liebestraim Liszt 

UBRTRITPK HILL1ARD. 

Vocal . , ..(a) The Arrow and the Sonjr ..... Gounod 

(b) Huwheen Neeelhum 

IIKIKN SWBRT. 

Piano Attaque des Uhlans Bohn 

TILL1B KAMMKYKIi. MAH1K 00O88. 



Washburn 7, K. S. A. C. 2. 

The College team met their first defeat at the 
hands of a Kansas team. on Tuesday, when 
they were defeated by Washburn by a score of 
7 to 2. No reason can be given for the defeat 
except that Washburn did the better work. 
All their scores were made in the first two in- 
nings, when they touched Fury for six hits and 
two sacrifices. These, with a base on balls 
and two errors, brought in seven runs. After 
the second inning they secured only one hit off 
of Fury. Our first run was scored in the 
second inning, when Mall on got four balls, 
went to second on Cave's sacrifice, and scored 
on Miller's three-baggar. Tre second score 
came in the seventh inning, when Porter, Fury 
and Strong each secured singles. Our boys 
secured eight hits off of Riegle, but with the 
exception of the seventh inning they were not 
bunched. 

The Washburn team has made great im- 
provement since they played here. They have 
a new catcher and he is a good one. Johnson, 
at first base, played a fine game. They still 
have one exceedingly weak point, and that is 
their center field. 

Our boys did fairly well in the field. Not a 
single ball went to the outfield, so they could 
do nothing. The infield was a little off at 
times, but their errors were not costly. In 
justice to the team, we might state that Mallon 
and Cave had sore shoulders and could hardly 
raise their arms, while Miller had a broken 
bone in his hand. In the fourth inning Wash- 
burn had three men on bases with one out, but 
Cunningham shut White out at home and Cave 



threw Johnson out at first. "Shorty" Haynes 
played a fine game throughout. Cave led the 
team at hatting, getting two hits out of three 
times at bat. 
Score by innings: 

ii \i IE 

E.3.A.C o— i-o -o-o-O- 1 -n— 0=2 h k 

Washburn 4-3— 0—0-0-0 0-0-*=" 7 3 

Batteries — Fury and Miller, Riegle and Robb. 

Alpha Betas. 

The Alpha Beta society showed its interest 
in athletics by attending the game Saturday. 
However, at an early hour President Matherly 
called the society to order and a business ses- 
sion was held. e. a. 

Athletic Notes. 

The line-up for the Washburn track meet 
will be: 
One hundred-yard dash— Cain and Kdelblute. 
Sixteen-pound shot put- -Seng and Farrar. 
One-mile run— Mill igan and Stauffer. 
Running broad jump— Watkins and Oskins. 
Two hundred twenty yard dash--Fdelblute 
and Cain. 

One hundred twenty yard hurdle- Schroeder 
and Lawson. 

Sixteen-pound hammer throw— Seng and 
Farrar. 

Four hundred forty yard dash— Mill igan 
and Cart'. 
Running high jump— Watkins and Oskins. 
Half-mile run— Thurston and Stauffer. 
Discus throw— Seng and Schroeder. 
Two hundred twenty yard hurdle— Jones and 
Carr. 
Two-mile run— Bealy and Birch. 
One-mile relay— Jones, Cain, Milligan, and 
Kdelblute. 

The Rooters' Club is working for an excur- 
sion to Topeka next Saturday, May 11*. Par- 
ticulars later. 

Odds and Ends. 

"Beautiful persons are rarely otherwise of 
great virtue."'— Jinwm. 

The world knows nothing of its greatest 
men . — He n ry Taylo r. 

I would rather make my name than inherit 
it. — Tkat'keray. 

Many a fool is counted wise because he knows 
just enough not to expose his ignorance.— Ex. 

"I suppose," said the condoling neighbor, 
"that you will erect a handsome monument to 
your husband's memory V" ' 'To his memory?" 
echoed the tearful widow. "Why, poor John 
hadn't any. To-day I was sorting over some of 
the clothes he left and found the pockets full of 
letters I had given him to post." 



4»4 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 




Rumor says that Topping 1 is a false alarm. 

"Milo" got "his" at chapel last Saturday 
morning. 

The sophomores will publish the Hkrald 
next week. 

O. J. Allison, oF O.naha, visited Zuck Sun- 
day and Monday. 

The Rathtudixt contained an amusing' write-up 
of the Ottawa game. 

The Hell Center boys have purchased blue 
caps for themselves. 

The "Hort" Department is busy spraying 
fruit-trees these days. 

The cadets will have target practice this week 
if the weather permits. 

Fluta Roberts visited home folks, near 
Morrill, Kan., last week. 

Allen Philips went home to see his mother 
and others Sunday. 

Emma Cain, '02, has recently closed a year's 
teaching in the school at Glaseo. 

Ray Moore, of Marshall county, visited with 
Walter Loch a few days last week. 

May-basketers have been seeking out all the 
dark corners of yards the past week. 

The Y. II, C. A. advisory board met in reg- 
ular business session Monday evening". 

Tom Haslem was showing his sister from 
near Osage City around College last week. 

The class in farm management is taking up 
the study of farm mechanics this half of the 
term. 

Miss Hopps went to Wamego Saturday to- 
act as a judge in a debating and oratorical 
contest. 

Barnett received Ave more replies to his ad. 
in last week's Her a I J). This makes eight 
replies. 

"Jorgy" was seen studying a Moatgomerv- 
Ward furniture and grocery catalogue the 
other day. 

President Nichols attended a regular meeting 
of the State Board of Education at Topeka 

yesterday. 

Professor Erf was called to Monroeville, 
Ohio, on account of the death of his sister last 
Friday evening. 

The Baker Omaye says that they will, on 
June 2, explain why they lost the game up here 
That's no secret at all. Anybody up here can 
tell 'em. 



Miss Adelia Cree and Mr. Arthur Town send 
embarked upon the sea of matrimony May 1. 

Miss Healy, a Washburn student from 
Topeka, visited Charlotte Morton Friday and 
Sunday of last week. 

The Farm Department finished p I anting corn 
Tuesday. About eighty acres of well-bred corn 
was pi anted this year. 

Eight hundred dollars was raised at the 
Hurrey meeting Sunday afternoon for the new 
Y. M.'C. A. building-. 

McClaskey has a perse verence that is mar- 
velous. With one t rouse r leg nearly severed 
Monday night he pursued a May-basketer to 
success. 

Professor McKeever will give the commence- 
ment address at the city high schools of Ells- 
worth and Salina and at the Jefferson county 
high school, 

"Milo." "Stauf" and "Papa" spent Monday 
morning in arguing "the whyness of the what" 
to the delight(Y) and edin*eation(?) of the other 
staff members. 

Regent EL T. Fairchild. of Ellsworth, received 
the republican nomination of State Superin- 
tendent of Public. Instruction last week. Here's 
hoping he gets it. 

Hastings has quit running. Desire for a 
sheep skin, faith in the other fellows and fear 
of spike- bred corns are some of the reasons he 
gives for quitting. 

Walter Korb, sophomore here last year, vis- 
ited College for a few days last week. He has 
been attending the Kansas City Veterinary 
College for the past year. 

Torje Carlson received word, April 2K, that 
his father was dangerously ill at his home near 
Almena, Kan. He left for that place Saturday 
evening. His father died the next day. 

General-manager Dean has arranged for a 
game here on June 1.1, the day before Com- 
mencement, with Fort Riley. An extra game 
with K. C. will probably be played here Mav 
22 or 21. 

The Oman-Hill tribe hung some May-baskets 
Saturday evening. Several lots of alfalfa 
were tramped out, and numerous barb- wire 
fences bear witness to the fact that said tribe 
did not see them in time. 

Emery McKee met an automobile while out 
driving Sunday evening. His horse first tried 
to stand on its head, then it tried to crawl 
under the rig. The harness and rig was taken 
home in two different bunches. 

The following is taken from the Baker Oranye: 
"Our boys are easily the strongest aggrega- 
tion of ball players in the State- if they would 
only get together." We move that "General" 
Hughes go down and blow them a few assemblv 
calls. 

Some one has suggested that a more liberal 
display of pennants at the baseball games would 
be an improvement. Let every student appoint 
himself a committee of one to have a K. S. A. 
C. pennant at the remainder of the «rames this 
season. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



435 



i 



NEW CLOTHING 



NEW SHOES 
NEW HATS 



Meet our 
Tailor 



NEW GOODS arriving 1 daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: :: :: :: :: 



JOHN COONS, of Course 



Walk/Over 
Shoes 






The following address was noticed on a letter 
mailed at the College: "Al. Blair's Wife, In- 
dependence, Kan., in care of Al. himself." 

The Witches gave their "boating party" in 
Commercial Club Hall last Monday evening on 
account of the rain storm and high waves on 
the Blue. 

Lost. — Sunday morning, betweenM. E. church 
and corner Fourth and Leavenworth streets, a 
clover-leaf brooch, set with rubies, Finder 
please leave at College post-offlee. 

The boys at the "barn" let very few May- 
basketers escape this spring. So far M. C. 
Donly has been chief chaser, and he has an 
unbroken record. Let the good work go on. 

Dr. Hugo De Vries, professor of botany in 
the University of Amsterdam, Holland, dis- 
coverer of mutation in plants and author of 
"Theory of Mutation." visited with Professor 
Roberts last week. He is investigating plant 
breeding at the American experiment stations. 



The following is a testimonial to the value of 
the Herald as an advertising medium. Mr. 
Barnett received this and many other replies 
to his advertisement in our last issue: 

My Dear Mr, Barnett: 

I note what you announce through the Stu- 
dents ' Herald. I told father but he objects; 
we must elope. Please meet me at half past 
nine with a pumpkin pie. (I made Boscoe's 
hat.) Lovingly, 

Your Milliner. 



It is rumored that K. IT. will bring a crowd 
up here May 21 with her ball team. 



Scene: Class in Rhetoric II. 

Mr. R.— Well, isn't it nearly always true 
that if a man is well educated he is of no use as 
a farmer? 

Prof. B.— Oh, no indeed. You are entirely 
mistaken. 

Mr. R.— It seems to work out that way any- 
way. 

Prof. B.— Very likely R. is just speaking 
from his own experience. 



Odds and Ends. 

Live for all it is worth for yourself and 
others. 

"Your goodness must have some edge to it, 
else it is none. "—Emerson. 

Actions of the last age are like almanacs of 
the last year.— Sir John Denham. 

One may be better than his reputation or his 
conduct, but never better than his principles. 
— Latent. 

"Women" have no originality— no inventive 
genius." "Nonsense; I have seen my type- 
writer make a memorandum with a hat-pin on a 
cake of soap when she had no paper handy." 

"His son failed to pass the Civil Service ex- 
amination in spelling and geography." 
"What's he going to do?" "I should say 
he'll go back to teaching school." 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 



Headquarters for College Text-Books 
and College Supplies of all Kinds 



Spalding's Line of Baseball and Sporting Goods 

Eastman's Kodaks and Camera Supplies 

Brownie Kodaks Only $1 and $2 

Keuffel & Eager Line of Drawing Tools and Material 



Prices Guaranteed as low as the lowest 



31 1 Poyntz Avenue 



430 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



New and 2r« r ' 
School Books 



Spectacles 
(fold Pens 



R. E. LOFINCK [ 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. Colleg-e Supplies, Notions and 
Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



C. F. Johnson, '06, who is farming- near 
Mayday, spent Sunday with friends in Man- 
hattan. 

Pearl Holderman, 'O.'l, who has heen at home 
this winter, expects to spend Commencement at 
her Alma Mater. 

W. W. St an field, '<fc% of the Farm Advocate 
staff of Topeka, paid his periodical visit to 
Manhattan last week. 

J. C. Cunningham, '05, stopped over Sunday 
in Manhattan in his travels for the Crete 
Nursery Co., of Crete, Neb. 

Geo, Gasser, '05, came down last week from 
Ft. Riley, where he is Y. M. C. A. secretary, 
for a short stay in Manhattan. 

We are indebted to our '•Jayhfnvker" friends 
for the announcement of the wedding of R. N, 
Dorman, 'l>4, and Elizabeth Downey, of North 
Topeka, which took place on April eighteenth. 




Copyright 1906 



It wouldn't 
be summer 
without 
Blue Serge 

fl No one need be with- 
out a Blue Serge Suit. 
They are all the rage, 
more than ever this 
season. The most pop- 
ular are 32- and 33- inch 
long at $12. $13.50, $15, 
$10.50, $18, and $20. 
Every size. New Ox- 
fords for Ladies and 



B. Kuppenh©imer& co. Gentlemen. 

Chicago 



= at 



E, L, Knostman s 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS Si. 00 
302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop, 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. X 2£ 

W, M, STINGLEY & CO. 



GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 

113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Buildinjr. 

Porcelain bat* tubs tine line cigars ana toilet articles 






L 





"THE OLD RELIABLE 



99 



.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make alt our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



Phone 167 




We Sell 

THE BEST 
p* 



AH Kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Fountain: 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 

ICE CREAM SODAS 



■bssbi 



i 






Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



V 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. ^ If so, don't mafce the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring.* Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
€| Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest fl Buy 
your separator NOW, and take die first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 
111S Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 
S and 11 Drumm Street, 



General Offices; 

74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

ISt Yotrrille Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 Vork Street 

WINNIPEG 
MB MeDennet Avenue 



£eeS6S6969G86« 









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KOMMHB1 




Our Young Men's Suits 



WE TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Clothes for the Young Man from 16 to 20 years of age. Our suits 
have the desired amount of style in cut and make-up, while the fabrics 
are the most appropriate. We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we. have made ready for them. 



■ m 



I They are $10.1 

V*L± 



You'll Find Our Suits Different 

00, $12.50, $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 and $22.00. 



ELLIOT 



312 

POYNTZ 

AVE. 





4, 

We Have Just Received 

Another shipment of the very latest styles in BELTS, including the 
Gold and Silver and the latest fads in Leather. Our line is complete, styles 
correct, prices small. A big showing in Wash Belts, including the "Alice 
Longworth." Six attractive styles at 10 cents. 

Our stock of BAGS includes the new shapes in Leather and White 
Canvas. They are well made, with strong frames. Prices 25 cents and up. 

The quality and extra high finish of our BACK- and SIDE-COMBS is well 
known. The line of Fancy Combs is now ready, and very attractive at 25 
cents to 98 cents. 

The 

Big Racket 





' '- 3 if 





17 



w*M m* 



I 



I 

I 




FOUR CENTS MORE FOR NO. 1 CREAM 

THAN FOR NO. 2 



The creameries of the country 
have become so convinced of the 
increased value of thick cream 
over thin cream that many of 
them are paying a premium on 
cream containing 30 per cent or 
more butter fat over that con- 
taining under 30 per cent. 

One of the largest buyers of 
cream in the West, the Hanford 
Produce Co., of Sioux City, la,, 
issued in January the following 
statement to its cream shippers: 
"We are going to offer a pre- 
mium of 4 cents per pound butter 
fat for what we term No. 1 
cream. Fibst-Okade cream 
shall consist of all band-separa- 
tor cream which is delivered at 
least twice a week in winter 
and three times per week in 
summer, this cream to be de- 
livered reasonably sweet and 
testing H(t per rent o r m o r e. 
Secono-Graoe cream shall con- 
sist of all hand-separator cream 
delivered in good condition not 
less than once a week or testing 
tern than -to per cent." 




Under these conditions cream- 
ery patrons should huy only the 
cream separator that can skim 
a heavy cream. The 

UNITED STATES 
CREAM SEPARATOR 

can skim a heavier cream than 
any other and do it without efag- 
gmff. The U. S. has the record 
of skimming a cream testing §& 
per cent. And remember also 
that the U. S, holds the World's 
Record for clean skimming. It 
gets the most cream and will de- 
liver as heavy a cream as you 
want. 

Write for a copy of our fine 
new 1906 separator catalogue 
No. 173, It tells why the U. S. 
can skim the Firmtaratle cream; 
how it made the World's Record 
for clean skimming and many 
other things you should know 
before you put any money into 
a cream separator. Write for a 
copy to-day -do it note while you 
think of it. addressing. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO., 



L- 



BELLOWS FALLS. 
VERMONT 

We probably have a selling agent in your vicinity, and if so, will give you his name when we send 
you the catalogue. It is his business to show you a United .States Separator if you want to see one. 



I 

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I 

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Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



FOR 

Ice-cream and 

Ice-cream sodas 



GOTO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturer! of 
Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Disc Cultivators. Safety 
Corn Harvesters. little Wonder Churns, Perfection 
Lawn Swings, Oak Stoves. Sash Weights, Chimney Caps 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs, Structural Iron Work. Stove Re- 
pairs, etc. :: :: :: ;: :: :; :: :; :; .. 

MANHATTAN, •:- ■:- KANSAS 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line, 
Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for ball 
games, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: ;: a :: ;: :: 



H. J. Barn house 



PHONE 65 



L. W. Phillips 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



437 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths fur one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 

L. W. TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 

-113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo. T\ Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, V EGETAB LES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 

For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NG'S 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Wait for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 

GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

tl ENGEL BROTHERS 




Any more pictures this 
term talk quick 

WOLF'S 

STUDIO 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 

ORR'S STUDIO 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Photo of any size or style. Souvenir Postal 

Cards of College and I. O. O. F. Home 

FOR SALE 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop. 

ao to 

Jl. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 

offer you only the best. X X 

W. M, STINGLEY & CO. 



438 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 





%$imtiWi 



Dry-Goods 

Have you seen the 

Dainty Swiss Organdies that 

we are showing at 50e a yd-' 

Printed Organdies at 25c. yd. 

Dutted Swiss Muslins. 

Dresden Patterns at 15c. 

Rose Butiste at 15c. yd. 

New White Duck. 

HAND BAGS. 

WHITE KID HELTS 

with the new fastenings. 




Krippendorf-Dittmann Cos Ladies' 
Shoes. They are the best you can buy. 

Ladies' Gymnasium Slippers $1 & $1.35 

BASEBALL SHOES 



New ShJrt-Waist Suits 
for Commencement. 

Dainty new graduation 

gowns beautifully made and 

trimmed. 

Dozens or different designs 
in white shirt- waists. 

Stylish white duck and linen 
skirts. 

Pongee and taffettu silk 
coats. 

New styles in caps. 

McCall patterns. 10c and I5c 
None higher. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 






IF YOU'RE THINK- 
ING WHY NOT ACT 




HH v /rfv» 

H& $C iw£*t^* ^^ 


»^&* 1 


An Irishman oi 
be a parrot, and 
Inquired if the 
"Faith, no." said 
of a thinkin'." 

We are triad u 
shoes and ozfor 
and can make a 

MOOR 


3^ ^>j^ 

ace bought an owl, believing it to 

a few weeks afterwards a friend 

^ird had yet commenced to talk, 

Pat. "but he is keepin' up a devil 

> have you think of our dry-goods, 
As. ladies' and gents' furnishings, 
visit to our store profitable to you. 

E BROS, & CO. 



Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopath v. Kirksville.Mo., 
and late of the Treating Staff of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free of charge. :: :: ;; « :; :: 

OFFICE: Union National PHONBl: Office, 134-2 

Bank Bldg., Rooms 15-30. Res.. 11*4-3 



PROFESSIONAL. 



DR. G. A. CUISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DK. J. E. TAYLOU, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 41 1 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Union National Bank Building 



Room 16. 



The Students' Herald 

SOPHOMORE NUMBER 



MOTTO: "NOT AT THE TOP, BUT CLIMBING 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., May 17, 1906. 



Number 34 



The Royal Purple. 
Tow*— "Avid Lomo .s'iw." 
I. 
There's a purple banner in the hree?,e 

That's very clear to me. 
In victory or in defeat 
It stands for K A. C. 

Chorus: 

Then hoist the Royal Purple high. 

To it we'll loyal be. 
It has our love and best support. 

Emblem of K. A. 0. 

II. 

In times gone past we've tried to find 

A place that equals thee. 
But all our efforts are in vain, 
.There's none like K. A. C. |Cho. I 

III. 
The time will come when we must leave. 

Hard will the parting he. 
But we'll always love that purple Hujr 

That stands for K. A. C. (Cho.l 



The Battle of the Bowl. 

Of the four classes in American colleges, there 
is prohably the most rivalry between the fresh- 
men and sophomores. We are all more or less 
familiar with May-day and flag scraps, hut 
very few people, especially in the west, know 
anything about "The Battle of the Bowl," 
which takes place each year at the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Before describing this "battle," it might be 
interesting to tell of its origin. One hot day a 
group of sophomores were lying on the grass 
in front of College Hall. As a fresh ie of very 
diminutive size passed by he was hailed by 
this group in the following manner: "Hey, lit- 
tle boy, does your mamma know you're out?" 
"Has your nursie washed your hands and face 
this morning?" "Where is your bottle?" 

This last remark gave the sophomores an 
idea. While one causfht the fresh ie and held 
him, another went to a drug store and bought a 
nursing bottle, in which they put some villain- 
ous fluid which the poor f res hie was forced to 
drink. Soon the lawn in front of College Hall 
was the scene of a fierce battle. The upper 
classmen interfered, but the fresh ies wanted 
revenge, so the seniors decided to organize the 
forces and reduce the scrap to a scientific 
struggle. A wooden bowl ahout two feet in 
diameter was given to the soph ies, who were to 



decorate it with the crests of each class and any 
other insignia they wished. The freshies dressed 
one of their numher, who was to be the 
"bowlman," in a manner so he could be easily 
recognized. Back of the sophomores, on the 
field where the "battle" was to be held, was a 
high board fence. The object of the first half 
of the struggle was for the sophomores to touch 
the bowlman with the bowl before he could 
scale the fence. 

The second half of the battle took a different 
form. The bowl was placed in the middle of 
the field and the contestants struggled for ten 
minutes to see who could have the most hands 
on the ball at the end of the time. 

The " Bowl Fight " is to-day the greatest 
class contest that takes place at the University 
of Pennsylvania and the most, unique class 
contest in the United States. 



He called her Lilly, Pansy. Rose. 
And every other flower of Spring. 
Said she: I can't be all of those. 
So you must Li-lac everything.— Ex. 



Class History for I904-190S. 

When, at the first summons of the College bell 
in the fall of 1904. students came from "walk- 
ing to and fro in the earth and going up and 
down in it" to pause awhile at K. S. A. C, the 
class of 'OH came also. 

The southeast room on the first floor of An- 
derson Hall was the scene of our regular weekly 
meetings, presided over in the fall by Mr. Gas- 
ton, in the winter by Miss Harris, and in the 
spring by Mr. Wilber. 

Early in our career we showed our strong 
athletic propensities by throwing several in- 
quisitive sophomores from one of our meetings 
in which they were intruding; and all through 
the year we cultivated this propensity by par- 
ticipation in games, sports, and class scraps. 

On November 14 an elaborate class party was 
held in the gymnasium for the purpose of be- 
coming better acquainted with each other and 
our teachers. The short program rendered, as 
well as the games in which we indulged, con- 
tributed much to our enjoyment. Only five 



440 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



days later the hare and hound contest with the 
sophomores took place. This was our first 
great victory. Many thanks are due to the 
team; also to other members who took an active 
part in the race. 

It was not until Mar. fl, 1005, that we again 
appeared before the public eye. This time it 



adopted. Scarcely was this question settled 
till the freshman-sophomore football game, re- 
sulting in a tie, was played. Then came the 
long-to-be- remembered "Beefsteak Roast." 
Journeying through the moonlight to Wildcat, 
we built bonfires, roasted meat on crooked 
sticks, told ghost stories, and woke the echoes 







■ ■ :i: > 



"The long- to-be-remembered beefsteak roast." 



'(•■ i 



was in the girls' basket-ball tournament that 
our class distinguished itself. "We did not 
lose, we simply failed to score the highest." 

For two weeks during the middle of April; 
class spirit ran high. The morning of the 15th 
about forty freshman girls appeared in chapel 
wearing crimson sunbonnets with golden 
strings. The boys of the class had many con- 
tests with the sophs, for possession of the '07 
hats, and succeeded in obtaining a goodly 

number. 
The freshmen and sophomores met on the 

diamond on June 1 and fought for the honors 

of a baseball game, but while we lost "Hope 

springs eternal in the human breast," and we 

calmly waited until next year. s. H. 



Class History for 1906-1907. 

In all the glory of newly acquired sopho- 
raoredom, we treaded the walks and halls at 
the beginning of fall term of '05, finally arriv- 
ing at our destination, room A 32, Here, as 
regularly as Tuesday approached, a band of 
loyal '08's met to conduct the highly important 
business of the most important class of a very 
important institution. Stella Hawkins wielded 
the gavel in the fall, Ralph Hull in the winter, 
and Edith Justin in the spring. Our attention 
was first devoted to changing the class colors, 
and ultimately "Alice" blue and white were 



with "Rock-a-date, Rock-a-date, Rock-a-date 
Kate, K. S. A. C. 1008." 

Then for a few months we rested till finally 
our pent-up energies culminated in a grand 
"Faculty reunion" in the Gymnasium. Even 
the grayest heads looked young that night, and 
perhaps never before, nor since, has Professor 
Walters presided in such a pleasing manner 
from the top of a table nor Mrs. Calvin so sat- 
isfactorily ministered to the cravings of the 
inner man. 

In the girls' basket-ball tournament we waved 
the banner of victory over the freshman and 
junior teams, but our friendliness towards the 
seniors forbade us to injure their feelings, and 
we allowed them to retain the cup for another 
year. The boys' basket-ball team brought 
honor upon itself by defeating the freshman 
team, who had hitherto claimed the champion- 
ship of the College. All glory to the 'OS bas- 
ket-ball team, the champions of the "cham- 
pions" of K. S. A. C. 

Another victory for our class this term was 
in the corn- judging contest, where our boys 
ranked first. It was in this, term, too, that we 
appeared in our beautiful "Alice" blue ties, 
which are admired alike by friend and foe. 

The skating rink party, held between terms, 
where sixty sophomores gathered to explore 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



441 



untried fields of adventure, was a grand suc- 
cess. Many a hearty laugh and many a grace- 
ful (?) motion were heard and seen upon the 
fioor that night. 

The year is drawing to a close. Our sopho- 
more days will soon be o'er, but we can look 
back with a proud eye conscious of a year well 
and profitably spent; 



Home plate eame very near receiving another 
call from the black and yellow in the eighth. 
Two hits gave Fairmount a vision that was 
very hard for them to get over. The last part 
of the eighth saw our boys go out in a one, 
two, three order. In the ninth, a hit, a sacri- 
fice and an error by Porter put men on second 
and third. But the the next three men went 




'The skating-rink patty." 



Victory No. 10. 

In a most exciting game last Thursday after- 
noon Fairmount lost to the "Royal Purple." 
In the first four innings only twelve men faced 
Choppy, while thirteen faced Davis. The sec- 
ond inning saw the black and yellow put out 
at both second and third. 

In the fifth inning four men went to bat for 
Fairmount and five for K, S. A. C. In this in- 
ning Kahl got one of the two passes that Davis 

issued. 
James started the sixth with a single, went to 

second on a pass by Ikey, and to third on a 
wild throw by Col dwell. The next two men up 
knoeked grounders to Choppy, who handled 
them in a keen-eyed manner, putting both men 
out at first. The last man up batted to Herb. 
Strong. Herb, started the last half of the sixth 
with a hit, and went to second on a passed ball 
by Merrey. Cunningham got to first and Herb, 
to third on an error by Burton. Al. got a hit 
which scored Herb, and Sol. Mallon struck 
out, and Miller sacrificed. Shorty batted to 
James, who played ante-over second which 
scored Al. Porter went out at first. 

The seventh was started with a single by 
Davis. G. Solter and James each got a two- 
bagger. While this was going on, Ikey let a 
ball pas's and Choppy made a wild throw to 
second, which accounts for their three scores. 
Only four of our men swung the stick in this 
inning. 



out in one, two, three order. At this time 
Choppy was all in. He pitched with a bum arm 
thathurthim nearly every throw he madeagainst 
a strong team, and came out victorious. In our 
half, Porter set a bad example by striking out. 
Kahl, by a little exclamation, persuaded Davis 
to let him walk again. Cave was given a 
chance to try his luck with the stick after lay- 
ing off with a bum shoulder. He got to first 
on a nice single, and Kahl went to third. Herb, 
knocked a grounder to Davis. Davis threw to 
catcher in order to head Kahl off. The catcher 
threw wild to third, and Kahl made the score 
that gave us the victory. 
The score: 

Fairmount. ab B h sh po a b 

James, ss 5 o 3 o o 4 1 

MeClutfKttire, cf 5 

Burton. 3b 5 10 4 1 

Bates, 2b 4 2 2 1 

Davis, p 4 1 I 6 5 1 

G. Solter. rf 4 12 2 

Clark, lb 4 I 10 

Merrev, c 4 1 10 1 I 

AbSolter.lf 2 10 110 

Totuls 37 3 10 1 25* 14 5 

K. S. A. C. AB B H SH PO A B 

H.StroniMf 5 12 10 

Cunningham, ss 4 10 5 1 

Al.Stronw.cf 4 18 110 

Mallon, 2b 4 3 3 

Miller, c 3 18 1 

Harnett, lb 4 1 18 1 

Porter, rf 3 110 1 

Kahl, 3b 2 10 110 

Colflwell.p 3 6 1 

Cave+ 10 10 

Totals 33 4 6 2 27 17 4 

*One man out when winning score was made, 
tBatted for Cold well in the ninth inning. 



442 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Score by innings: 



Falrmount. 
K. S. A. 0.. 



. 0-0-0 -a— 0-0-3-0-0 =3 
. -0 -0-0— -3—0 -0-1=4 



Summary— Struck out: by Davis 10, by Cold- 
well 5; Bases on balls: off Davis 2, off Cold- 
well 1; three base hit: Al. Strong: two base 




"Wearing crimson sunbonnets." ( See page 440.) 

hit: G. Solter, James; stolen bases: Davis, 
Ab. Solter, Cave, and Cunningham. Umpire, 
Van Antwerp. 

Infinite toil would not enable you to sweep 
away a mist, but by ascending a little you may 
often look over it altogether. So it is with our 
moral improvement: we wrestle with a vicious 
habit which could have no hold upon us if we 
ascended into a higher moral atmosphere.— 
Helps. 



Last Lecture. 

The last lecture on this year's course was 
given Wednesday evening by L. B. Wickersham. 
The audience was a little larger than the aver- 
age, and perhaps a little more attentive. At the 
usual time— thirty minutes late -the Cueer 
Cuartette furnished the evening's music, and 
then responded to an encore with "Annie 
Laurie." 

The subject of Mr. Wickersham 's lecture was 
"Day Dreams." He made the statement that 
the successful farmer, teacher or business man 
of to-day was more than likely the "day 
dreamer "of the past. In supporting this state- 
ment he cited the life history of Isaac Newton, 
HeDry Clay, and Jas. A. Garfield— " day 
dreamers" whose dreams had come true. 

Mr. Wickersham said: "Unless you know 
more than the name of a boy or the circum- 
stances of his birth, you don't know him." A 
boy who has dreams of the future and wants to 
make a mark in the world will succeed. In 
speaking of himself and his own boyhood 
"daydreams," Mr. Wickersham said: "I shall 
never be able to p reach as I dreamed I would 
preach, but I can preacli better for having 
dreamed." 

The lecture war full of good, interesting 
thoughts, mixed with enough humor to keep 
the audience feeling good. Every one seemed 
to be well pleased with it, and as a lecture it 
was probably the most satisfactory of the 
course. 



Flo was Tond of Ebenezer— 
Eb. for short, she called her beau. 

Talk of "tide of love." «reat Ctfisar! 
You should see em, Kb and Flo.— Ex. 



Agricultural Association. 

Shortly after 1:30 the association was called 
to order by President Connor. H. A. Ireland 
and O. J. Olson were elected members and 
"Pat" was initiated. Next came the program, 
to all of which we bent a listening ear. That 
which was not inaudible to us was well worth 
our attention. The debate was the best num- 
ber and was among the best of the season. 
H. G. Maxwell proved, by quotations from 
recognized authorities, that for a K. S. A. C. 
graduate the dairy animal is more profitable 
than the beef animal. W. T. McCall proved 
the negative by establishing himself as his own 
authority and loading us with indisputable 
facts. In this case of "doctors disagreeing," 
the judges awarded the decision to the affirma- 
tive because he had cited the more numerous 
authorities. Fellow agricultural students, you 
cannotXafford to be absent when such impor- 
tant decisions are being made. w. a. s. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



443 




444 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 





Offlcal Score Baker-K, S. A C. 


Track Meet 








EVENTS. 


First. 


Record. 


Second. 


Record. 


Third. 


Baker. 


K.S.A.C. 


lOO-yd. dash 


Cain 


10 sec 


Edelblute 
Watkins 

Stauffer 

Axton 

Cain 


10J sec 

9 ft. 6 in ,.,, 
33 ft 


Preston 

Wilgus ...... 

Arnett 

Oskins 

Preston 


1 

1 
t 1 
1 
3 
1 


| 


Pole vault 


Osklns 

SenR 


9 ft. 6 in , 

33 ft. m 

5m. 4S sec... 
19 ft. ej in . . . . 

241 sec 

21 i sec 


8 


Shot put 


8 


220-yd. dash 


Millijtan 

Watkins 

Kideihlute.... 

Nybenr 

Farrar 


B m. 81 sec... 
19ft. U in — 


8 
6 

8 


ISO yd. hurdle 






| 


Hammer throw 


90 ft. 1 in 

54J sec. 

5 ft 


Sens 


SM ft. 6 in 

Ml sec 

5 ft 


Baker... 

Carr 

Mitche>l 

Thurston 

Sheldon 


1 

3 

1 

3 
4 

2 

3 

3 


8 


440- yd. dash 

High jump 


MilhVan 

i Oskins* , 1 
* Watkins*.... 1 

Seng 


Dunstan 


6 

8 


8H0-yd. run... 

Discus throw 


2 m. 12 sec — 
97 ft. 4 in., , 

29 sec 


j Lawsou* *_ 

i Dunstan* f 

Kran* 


2 m. 131 sec... 
74 ft. 4 in.. 

31 sec. .... 


6 
5 


220-yd. hurdle 


Jones. 


M 




Bealey 

1 Cain ! 

1 Milliiriin 1 
lEdelbluie.... 1 


11 m. 24 sec. . . 
1 m. 50J sec. . . 


1 1 m 3 1 .)-' sec 




I 




(Dunstan | 

Sheldon. , 1 






5 










Totals 


2ft 


101 



♦Tie. 



Baker 28, K. S. A. C. 101. 

In one of the most one-sided track meets that 
was ever pulled off, Baker lost to the wearers 
of the Royal Purple last Monday. K. S. A. C. 
took Brat in everything, seven seconds and 
three thirds, while Baker grot six seconds and 
eight thirds. Three men were disqualified in 
the high hurdles for knocking down hurdles. 
Oskins and Watkins tied for first in the pole 
vault as far as heighth is concerned, but si nee 
Oskins went over with one less trial first place 
belongs to him. In the high jump they tied 
again because there was no necessity .of going 
higher. In the hundred-yard dash a new 
record of ten seconds flat was made by Cain. 
Milligan, Seng, Oskins and Watkins were the 
men who gained the most points for our team, 
Milligan getting ten points, Seng thirteen, 
Oskins ten, and Watkins twelve. 

The Baker team was unfortunate in losing 
their weight man, on whom they had relied to 
bring in a couple of firsts. The visitors were 
a fine lot of athletes and they took defeat like 
true sportsmen. 

Hamps. 

The Hamilton society met at the usual time 
and place and was called to order by Vice- 
president Holloway. During roll-call we were 
impressed with the fact that a number of the 
gentlemen Franklins are very ungallant. After 
prayer by E. G. Schaefer, we proceeded to the 
program. 

Donald Ross introduced Miss Hickman, who 
rendered a vocal solo. Frank Ferris told us 
of a time when he obtained a few (s) cents. J. 
W. Crooks showed us some cartoons which he 
wished us to think were drawn by an artist. 
A, J. Cowles and Karl Hofer then furnished 
some music for Tinkham; Miss Brown played 
for Buckman: Foresman sang a solo: and* B, 



H. I'ainter permitted us to henr, "His Master's 
Voice." Judge Ha/,en gave us a stump speech 
on "Baseball." He carefully mentioned the 
fact that he also had one on "May- baskets," 
and so we gave him the necessary permission 
to tell us how it's done. We hereby challenge 
the A. B's. and the Webs, to produce a man 
that has caught as many as has the "Judge." 
After O' Conner had furnished us an original 
story, we patiently listened to our critic as he 
told us how it should be done. 

After recess Mr. Shaw was initiated. Every 
one then busied himself in an endeavor to 
"frustrate" the "chair," which was only par- 
tially successful. In the melee following, our 
hero became excited and declared that he bad 
"never caught a one," but on further examina- 
tion we found that he was speaking of "high 
balls" this time. Soon the lights winked and 
we adjourned. r. h. 

Troubles Ahead. 

When the daughter of the house returns from 
college she is sometimes inclined to forget that 
there are serious duties awaiting her. It is then, 
says an exchange, that the wise mother brings 
her to a different point of view. 

The girl had l>een very clever in her studies 
and had l»een at home only a few days when she 
said to her mother: "Yes, I've graduated, but 
I don't want to lose my interest in my work, 
and I shall try to keep up ray psychology, 
zoology, en to— " 

" Just wait a minute," said her mother. "I 
have arranged a course for you in roastology, 
boilology, stitchology, darnology, patchology, 
and general doraesticology. You might as 
well begin right now. Get your apron on and 
pluck that chicken." 



Baseball- -K. U., May 21 and 22. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



445 




Wilber 
Warren 



Gaston Jeffs 

Gunninirham (Capt.) 






440 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



A City of To-day. 

In the land of sunny Kansas 
Where two rivers wend their ways 

And the hills u limn are rising 
Stands a city— great its praise. 

nuilt of stone are all the buildings. 

O'er the walls the ivy climbs. 
While the trees which there are growing 

Are as lovely as the vines. 

Cinder walks are in this city. 

Macadamized the carriage drives. 
Many are the different workmen 

Who within this city thrive. 

Strong the men of this grand city. 

Body, mind, and spirit, too. 
Teaching those who gather round them 
All must think and dare and do. 

True the women of this city. 

Noble they, and brave as well. 
Just how deep their fount of knowledge 

Human tongue cannot yet tell. 

Brk'htly now In many countries 
(ileum the lights which never fail. 

For the rays from this grand city 
Shall o'er all the world prevail. 

And afar for many ages 

Through the deepest of the maze, 
Shall he seen this city's glory— 

(v. S. A. C. - great its praise. 



Ionian Society. 

May 12, a goodly number of Tonians and 
visitors met in the society hall and were called 
to order by Pres. Alma McRae. The program 
consisted largely of musical numbers: a piano 
solo by Ruth Taylor, who responded with an 
encore, and two instrumental duets by Misses 
Coons and Knmmeyer, and Edna Jones and 
Mary Lane. In a select reading Mamie Frey 
aroused our sympathies for a little duck that 
had run away from home and was finally re- 
stored to it again. We w.mvs favored with 
another duet, vocal this time, by thn Misses 
Stump. Nelle Wolf's novelty music, a Chil- 
dren's quartet, reminded the country lassies 
of the days when they wore aprons and sun- 
bonnets and carried slates to school, and when 
pressed with hard problems said: "I don't 
care what teacher says I can't do this sum." 
A vocal solo by Miss Hill was followed by the 
read in g of the "Oracle,'* editor Stella Camp- 
bell. The Captain should have been present 
to see the dress parade, which was certainly an 
astounding" success, though he may have been 
discouraged in the realization of the fact that 
he might as well withdraw from a hopeless 
competition. A business session followed and 
adjournment. n. m. n. 

Websters. 

The gavel, wielded by President Conner, 
called us to order. Then we gave I, R. Brock 
the floor that he might ascertain the numl>er of 
Websters who, for the time being, had deserted 
and were probably seeking amusement at the 
Franklin special. Or maybe Cupid was to 
blame for their absence. 

We plunged into our program with a vim 



equal to that of an athlete, and to say the least 
it was varied, amusing, and instructive. Char- 
acterized all the way through by that air of 
jollity, interest and good fellowship that binds 
the heart to the society, it helped to weave 
memories that will, in the years to come, be 
recalled again and again and enjoyed as often 
as they are recalled. 

Now as to the program. The features de- 
serving the most praise we will mention first. 
These features were the musical numbers, each 
of which seemed to excel any that had preceded 
it. The music was by all means the best fea- 
ture of the program. The society comedians, 
masquerading under the name of "All Stars," 
won a home in the hearts of all present by 
their ability to overcome the giggles. 

After a short business squabble we asked 
Mr. W. W. Hutto. an ex- Webster, to address 
us and he did so. FT is address was of a nature 
that fascinates and draws out the listener, and 
being delivered in the way it was it undoubt- 
edly appealetl to all who were fortunate enough 
to hear it. s. w. 0. 

A Mishap. 

Perhaps none have told it— this story thev liar- 
How euch of the juniors would wear a tine star. 
Adorned with these emblems to niarlt them as stars 
They would reel like the dude with his Hnest cigars 
Hut think of their feelings and picture their lix 
When instead of \n, each pin read '«(. 



Franklin Special. 

The Franklin Special program given Satur- 
day evening in the old chapel was a decided 
success. Tt has heen pronounced the best 
special yet given. Although this program h;id 
l>een postponed, there was a crowded house ex- 
pectantly awaiting the good things which they 
knew were in store for them. 

The first number, Mrs. Hutto' 8 piano solo, 
was a musical treat which preceded a very 
striking and unique [tart of the program, "The 
Hunters' Drill." This drill was given by 
eight ladies and eight gentlemen attired in very 
appropriate and pretty costumes. The effect 
caused by the appearance of the hunters and 
the perfect execution of the drill was mar- 
velous, holding the entire audience spell-bound 
until the end, when the hall rang with enthu- 
siastic applause. 

In the interlude came a piano selection by 
Miss Jones, which was followed by the "Spec- 
tator" by Ole Oleson. Mr. Oleson's literary 
ability was well exemplified, but owing to the 
strong wind it was not heard distinctly by all 
present. 

The vocal solo by Miss Worden, accom- 
panied by Miss S perry, was excellent. This 
was followed by a cornet-violin duet by Messrs. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



447 



Seng 1 and Hand, accompanied by Miss Harold, 
which was appreciated by all. 

The farce, "Striking Oil," was the final 
number, and it was certainly a "striking" one. 
The very credible way in which it was given 
showed the marked ability of the actors. 

"Well, weally." it was a "raawvelous" pro- 
gram, but "that's always the way" "doneh-er- 
know," when it is given by the "Franks." 

They Say 

That "Swud" Lawson got "his" one day 
last week. 

That another one of the junior "crows 1 ' has 
been found. 

That Washburn claims the State baseball 
championship. 

That the freshman baseball team has another 
game scheduled. 

That it wasn't Boscoe that "changed the 
luck' ' of the team. 

That Arthur Kiene is going to enter the U. 
S. Postal Service. 

That the "no-hat" club is, in reality, a new 
Greek letter fraternity. 

That T. F. White has purchased a pair of 
"dog-proof" trousers. 

That "We walloped the mighty seniors by 
a score of tive to five." 

That Bea Cave wanted to take a balloon trip 
after the Washburn game. 

That all of the H. C. boys were at church 
Sunday night except "Cap." 

That E. L. Shattuck is impatiently waiting 
for the Jewell county excursion. 

That Washburn cancelled their track meet 
here because they had "cold feet." 

That a "prep" measures the ability of a stu- 
dent by the number of pencils he carries. 

That the '"07 Copy Book" will contain a 
complete list of all ideas copied by the junior 
class. 

That the freshmen will fully explain the 
"championship basket-ball games" in their 
issue. 

That a member of the Herald staff burned 
himself by reading "red-hot" news from the 
Indwttiialist. 

That Fred Hayes will spend his vacation 
studying under "Professor Dillenbeck, of 
Kansas City." 

That when a young man can not think of any 
other way of attracting attention he grows 
whiskers in front of his ears. 



Exchanges. 

Ground has been broken for a new university 
library at Yale. 

President Jordan, of Leland Stanford, states 
that a loss of $4,000,000 has been sustained by 
the university through the recent earthquake. 

" Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof," 
sit id the student as he studied all night for a 
Hunk test and never looked at his regular les- 
son for the morrow. 

Over one hundred students at Oberlin who 
lost money through the failure of the Citizens' 
National Bank, of Oberlin, were aided by Mr, 
Carnegie's gift of fifteen thousand dollars. 

The University of the Cape of Good Hope is 
the only institution in south Africa authorized 
to confer degrees. It was founded in 1873 after 
the model of the University of London and still 
exercises only the functions of examining the 
candidates for degrees. There are ft ve colleges 
including one for women, which prepare stu- 
dents for the university examinations. 

The faculty of Columbia University has de- 
cided to abolish the four- years* course which 
has prevailed in the past, and so make it pos- 
sible for an ambitious and industrious student 
to complete the required work for an A. B. de- 
gree in three years. The old system, President 
Butler declares, places an actual premium on 
loafing, and is "an indefensible waste of time 
and education, which our national wastefulness 
has permitted to become ludicrous." 

A million-dollar girl's college is to be 
founded at Pasedena, Cal. President Jordan, 
of Leland Stanford, has been appointed honor- 
ary president of the institution, and the other 
members of the faculty are being selected as 
rapidly as possible. The donor is Mrs. J. J. 
Johnson, of Colorado, an enthusiastic advo- 
cate of the education of women. The school 
will be opened to those students who qualify at 
the examinations and will give both liberal 
arts and scientiftc courses. 



Send in your order for an 



'06 

BANNER 



K. U. vs. K. S. A. C, May 21 and 22. 



$1.25 



Plus 

Postage 



R A, KIENE, 



Manhattaa t 
Kansas 



448 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



The Students* Herald 

SPECIAL SOPHOMORE NUMBER 



Motto: "Not at the Top. but Climbing." 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, rtve cents. 

SOPHOMORE STAFF 

J. It. Coxbn Editor-in-chief 

Stblia Hawkins Literary Editor 

O. W. Weaver Local Editor 

B. H. Wilbek Reporter 

kSSbull I ..Associate Local Editors 

H. A. i*k aw ; Kit Exchange Editor 

Eltkaheth Sweet... Alumni Editor 

S. W. Cunningham ..Mascot 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., May 17, 1906 


• 




a: editorials 


X 


^^^^^ *^v«* 



In behalf of the sophomore class, we wish to 
extend to the editor and staff of the Herald 
our thanks for their kindness in turning over 
to us this issue of the paper. 



Baker is to be congratulated on having such 
a fine bunch of fellows for a track team. It is 
seldom that we have the pleasure of meeting as 
gentlemanly a set of young men as those who 
were here Monday. 



The showing made by our track team last 
Monday is one of which we are especially 
proud. We looked for a "victory, but hardly 
expected such an easy one. Such a team cer- 
tainly deserves the best support of the student 
body, and it is probable that the student 
body will give that kind of support. An 
excursion is being planned to accompany the 
team when they go to Topeka to participate in 
the intercollegiate meet. Let every one push 
this project and help in every way, for with 
good support we believe that our team can win 
first place. 



We publish, in this issue, the words of a new 
song, which was handed to us. Whether or 
not it will meet with the approval of the stu- 
dents, can not yet be told, but the fact remains 
that we need a new College song. We have a 
good song— good for some occasions— but wo 
need a new, snappy song to sing at class par- 
ties, at athletic contests, and at student meet- 
ings of all kinds. It might also be stated that 
we need a new yell. Our present yell is all 
right, but we need another one, a short one, 
full of vim and ginger, that will make a fellow 
"get up on his toes." Let some one get busy 
and start something. 



A recent exchange from one of the Kansas 
schools devotes a considerable amount of 
space to knocking on the support given their 
baseball team. They speak of ■ number of 
students M hooting and jeering " their own 
team from the side-lines. To those who know 
anything about the conduct of the students at 
that institution, such reports sound rather 
strange. We knew that they made a practice 
of treating some of the visiting teams in that 
manner, but we hardly supposed that they 
would treat their own team that way. In one 
of the lectures given in our course this year the 
speaker said: "Show me an institution where 
rowdyism and revelry hold sway and I will show 
you an institution untouched by the spirit of 
pure, clean athletics." To those schools that 
have such trouble with their students we suggest 
that they try a little "pure, clean athletics" 
for a change. 

Odds and Ends. 

Many are called but few get up.— Ex. 

A warm blundering man does more for the 
world than a frigid wise man. — Cecil, 

The recent invention of wire glass for win- 
dows has made it possible to construct 
thoroughly fire-proof buildings. 

Banana fiber is now being converted into 
rope and paper. Both rope and paper are 
found to be of excellent quality. 

The Harvard Semetic Museum has received 
a collection of one hundred twenty-five Syriac 
manuscripts dating from the twelfth century. 

The Cornell summer school will offer this 
year one hundred courses in nineteen depart- 
ments. Its faculty will consist of sixty-one 
members, most of them on the regular staff. 

The college of the city of New York has 
obtained as a relic the dish used by Ex-Pres. 
Grover Cleveland when at school in Fayett- 
ville, N. Y. The dish has the name of "G. 
Cleveland" carved on it with a jack-knife. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



449 




Coating Events* 

May 21, Military Ball. 
May 21, Baseball with K. IT. 
May 22, Baseball with K. U. 

The rabbit seemed to bring luck to the base- 
ball team again. 

Victor Oman is managing the baseball squad 
Tor the sophomores. 

Clarence Kirk was visited by his father for a 
few hours Friday night. 

Prank Harris came up from Salina Sunday 
for a visit with his parents. 

Several assistants went boat riding on the 
Blue last Thursday evening. 

Al. Strong's picture will be published in the 
next issue of the score-book. 

Almost any pleasant evening finds the supply 
of boats on the river too small. 

Target practice will begin this week. Com- 
pany D is the first on the range. 

It is reported that the juniors will call their 
class hook the '"07 Copy-book." 

The Ag. Review is running a standing joke on 
the junior class on their editorial page. 

The senior Ag's. have our sympathy. Over- 
coats would have been more appropriate. 

The Mechanical Department is erecting a 
shelter-hall in the rear of the blacksmith shop. 

Charles Stants was visited by his father 
from Kensington, Kan., for several days last 
week. 

One of the professors says that about sixty 
per cent of the students received low grades or 
failures at mid-term. 

Perhaps a coating of nice shiny black paint 
would spoil the appearance of the iron fence 
north of the chemistry building. 

It is rumored that two prominent juniors 
have passed the "first stage" and that their 
engagement will soon be announced. 

Those young people who were "game" and 
went boat riding during the threatening weather 
had the satisfaction of being shot at. 

"Puzzle" Jones occupies a seat on the play- 
ers' bench at each ball game. Visiting teams 
take his advice on all points of etiquette. 

In 1903 we won from K. U. by a score of 19 
to «. In 1904 we beat them 7 to 3. In 1905 the 
score was K. S. A. C. 6, K. U. 4. Next Monday 
will tell what we will do to K. U. in 190B. 



One member of the junior class insists that 
the picture on the eover of the junior issue of 
the Herald was an eagle and not a crow. 

"Jimmie" Hughes, who has left school, came 
out from Topeka Wednesday for a short visit. 
He and his mother rode over on horseback. 

Although many letters in our words are si- 
lent ones, did you ever notice how loud they be- 
come if misused in a college man's spelling. 

Senator La Follette put the Senate to sleep 
the other day with a 75,000 word speech. Just 
think what we might have had when he was here. 

Who says that college men don't get up in 
the world? Over fifteen sets of initials are 
carved on the wooden parts of ihe water tank. 

In the Tennis Tournament that has been held 
for the past month Robert Berkeley won first 
in singles, E. J. Evans second, and H. R. 
Heim third. 

Reverend Bright, of the Methodist church, is 
causing trouble among the fair members of his 
flock by insisting that they take off their hats 
during church. 

It is said that some of the K IT. students 
took plenty of liquid refreshments during their 
recent visit to Baldwin for the K. JJ.- Baker 
baseball game. 

We would suggest that the sporting editor of 
the Indwirialutf- say "baseball team" instead of 
"College athletic team" and "Athletic Park" 
instead of "the arena." 

The exhibition given by the "gym" girls 
this year will probably be held later than us- 
ual. The features will he a May-pole dance, 
rope- jumping, and tennis. 

"Shorty" Haynes won a swell shirt because 
of his batting at Emporia. A traveling man 
offered the shirt to the player getting the best 
batting average, and "Shorty" was "it." 

It was certainly the darkest degree of igno- 
rance which could be manifested when a young 
man at a recent baseball game asked why the 
number of batters each inning was not the 
same. 

V. H. Berkey gave such an impassioned ad- 
dress to the Alpha Betas last Saturday on the 
Chinese immigration question that they voted 
to send him to Washington to tell congress 
about it. 

The number of dandelions on the campus is 
only exceeded by the number of chanees offered 
through the newspapers for getting rich by 
selling views of the "Horrors of San 
Francisco." 

The Students' Coop. Association held their 

annual election Saturday evening. H. H. Con- 

*well was elected president, L. M. Jorgenson 

book-store manager, and J. H. Cheney dining- 

hall manager. 

Indications are that about 'teen seniors 
names will not appear on the programs for 
Commencement Day, they not having filed their 
theses subjects. The Printing Department is 
working on the programs now, and unless these 
slow seniors "cough up" pretty soon they will 
"be weighed in the balance and found wanting. " 



450 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Ptve cent novels; 

Lessons punk; 
Grades are zero. 

So they flunk.— Kr. 

Only four weeks more. 

Ask Jack if he had any pennies Sunday 
night, 

Miss Ella Weeks spent Sunday in Lincoln 
visiting- friends. 

Fine watch and jewelry repairing at Ask- 
ren's, the jeweler. 

Mr. Crayton enjoyed a visit from his sister 
during the past week. 

Tom White expects to study law at Ann Ar- 
lx>r, Mich., next year. 

The Y. W. C. A. girls expect to give a May 
breakfast in the near future. 

The Herald office was almost swamped with 
spring poetry Monday morning. 

Kansas University will have two hundred 
seventy -five graduates this year. 

Miss Jenkins is out of College this week suf- 
fering from a case of the mumps. 

The.A. B's. and "Franks" expect to have a 
game of baseball in the near future. 

Miss Almyra Kerr is enjoying a visit with 
her mother from Clay county this week. 

Philips wears a small "dog chain" on his 
left wrist. He does not carry the key either. 

Harry Oman came down from Leonardville 
Saturday to visit with his brother and friends. 

Askren, the graduate optician. Glasses 
scientifically fitted. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

An excursion on the Rock Island from Norton 
and intermediate points will visit K. S A C 
May 29. 1 

Roscoe Shaw, formerly of the Experiment 
Station, was visiting friends in town over 
Sunday. 

There will be two baseball games with K U 
next week They will decide the State baseball 
championship. 

Each of the literary societies will receive 
seventy dollars as their share of the lecture- 
course proceeds. 

Baker students greeted some of their K U 
visitors with stale eggs at the recent K.'tT - 
Baker ball game. 

Watches, jewelry, silverware, and hand- 

EEfiS m m t ?* Askrea '*- T he largest assort- 
ment in Manhattan. 

The intercollegiate track meet will be held in 
Topeka May 28 Look out for a bigexc rsion 
One dollar round trip. m 

K. U. was easily defeated by Missouri list 
Saturday in their annual track meet This is 
their ninth consecutive victory over K r t« 
track athletics. * *• Um ln 

Misses Bertha Rochat and Kate Haslftm ™ 
turned to their homes in Counci Grove af^ 
several days' visit with their brothers T in^lo 5 
Rochat and Thos. Haslara DIOthers ' Lln dsay 



Lost, just south of Anderson Hall, a gold 
band ring. Finder please leave at College 
post-office and receive reward. 

Al. Cassell was forced to go home last week 
with his coat collar turned up. Some of the 
Vet. boys had swiped his shirt. 

Ralph Cooley left last week for Montana, 
where he has a position in a dairy. He is 
located near E. E. Greenough, '06. 

The Farm Department is sorting seed this 
week preparatory to planting a considerable 
acreage in Kafir-corn for a seed crop. 

Smith and Carter, of the Department of 
Agriculture, who are making a soil survey of 
Hi ley county, were around College Monday. 

Professor Valley, M. R, Shuler and F. R 
Machen hired a rig, bought poles, lines, hooks 
and refreshments and went fishing Saturday 
afternoon. A 3.91 -ounce, one-eyed, crippled 
sunfish was captured and massacred. 

Last Monday when the junior domestic sci- 
ence girls took their trip to Topeka, four of 
them were so busy seeing the sights that they 
missed their train and did not return to their 
College duties until the following afternoon. 

B. Cave heads the hatting list in the contest 
for the Anderson trophy. Coldwell is second 
Al. Strong is third. Herb Strong is fourth 
and Porter is fifth. The team is batting at a 
rate of about .250. That is mighty good for a 
college team. 

Pl T f \,w ( ' hemist '\V (to student after mid- 
term): 'Mr. A you should make your answers 
so plain that even the most ignorant could 
understand them." 

Student: "What was there you did not 
understand professor?" 

Mr. Zuck is becoming disgusted with news- 
paper reports Lately upon reading an 
account of our ball team while away from home 
rte learned that they were an "aggregation of 
sluggers" His opinion was that our boys 
always played clean ball. y 

In a letter received by Arthur Fury from the 
2Im aR h P ° f the u Min ™ a P<>Ks, Kan., baseball 
iwU . J*I! ^ at he is * oin * to tr -V to get 

SnffmL v S,n ^ let0 , n T 0f . the State NtVrmal ^d 
Hoffman, ^ oung and Johnson of K. U. for his 

oTwit^thr 1 "- Fury u * oin * to «* a **• 

young man a May- basket. R happened that 
c\ n uiht r tC tleman ',^ i?in ^ at ^e someplace 

m\£d w, ESS5 Iady - She was utterl .y disl 

wil no hST %h ! yOU ?* man that cau *ht her 
was not the one for whom the basket was in- 
tended, so she cried at the top of her voice ■ 
'Oh, you're not Archie, you're not Archie?- 

J??ZUS%ST&9*. Ha **ins are enjoy - 
SSJL .A ff«m their father, mother, grand- 
father and brother from Marshall county 

rnndf atw ? ? P K ace .u t0 ac ™ m P a ny her father, 

S,™ er , an ? br °ther on a trip through Ok- 

t a B ? ,] Missouri, but the health of the 

w ill r P sT,l D h t WS 11 them to *>• m ™ Grace 

wiu resume her College duties. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



I NEW CLOTHING 



451 



NEW SHOES t 
NEW HATS 






Meet our 

Tailor 



NEW GOODS arriving daily in every department. 
Students, it will be a pleasure for us to show you 
through our BIG STOCK. :: :: :: :: :: 



JOHN COONS, of Course 



} 



Walk-Over 
Shoes $ 

I 



Hoy, 

PHer. 

Electric 

Wire. 

Flume . 
Ited. 
Hoy 
Dead. 



Ask- 



Fine watch and jewelry repairing at 
ren's, the jeweler. 

The *'Coftp." bookstore sales amounted to 
over $8000 last year. 

L. M. Jorgenson is acting as agent for the 
"4 a Blue River Side Laundry." 

Arthur Kiene went to Kansas City, Monday, 
on business connected with the '0(i Banner. 

A meeting of the "swimming club" is called 
for Friday in the Dairy Hall at one o'clock. 

Professor Dickens attended the funeral of 
Phil. S. Creager, '1)1, at Kansas City, Sunday. 

Askren, the graduate optician. Glasses 
seienti tic ally fitted. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Watches, jewelry, silverware, and hand- 
painted china at Askren's. The largest assort- 
ment in Manhattan. 

About eighteen graduate Ionians spent a few 
hours quite pleasantly picnicking in the city 
park last Monday evening. 

At Wisconsin the faculty have decided to re- 
vive and enforce an old rule that any student 
who is known to have entered a saloon is to be 
expelled. 



When a clock is fast you can always turn it 
back, but it's different with a young man. 

Captain Shaffer is giving some of the 
"rookies" a good try-out. He is practicing a 
squad in the artillery manual each morning. 

George Griffith, who left College several 
weeks ago on account of mumps, returned last 
Monday and will be in College for the re- 
mainder of the term. 

Miss Alice Ipsen, former student, visited 
friends about College May 11. She was on her 
way to visit Miss Gertrude Moore, of Pratt, 
also a former student. 

Lost, May 10, at or near Athletic Park, a 
question mark stick pin, set with five or six 
pearls and a diamond. Finder please return 
to College post-office and receive reward. 

Rev. E. H. Gelvin will lecture on "Travels 
Through Scotland," at the Congregational 
church, Friday evening, for the benefit of the 
Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. summer confer- 
ence fund. 

The baccalaureate sermon, June 10, will be 
delivered by Rev. Daniel McGurk, of Kansas 
City. The Commencement address will be 
given by Prof. Edwin Erie Sparks, Ph. D., 
University of Chicago, on the afternoon of 
June 14. His subject will be, "Making an 
American." 

To Phiiup Here. 

Alltho thease lynes luk rather kweer. 
Their just putt In too tuiip here. 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE SttS^JET 



Spalding's Line of Baseball and Sporting Goods 

Eastman's Kodaks and Camera Supplies 

Brownie Kodaks Only $1 and $2 

Keullel & Esser Line of Drawing Tools and Material 



Prices Guaranteed as tow as the lowest 



31-1 Poyntz Avenue 



452 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



New and HW 
School Books 



Spectacles 
Gold Pens 



R. E. LOFINCK 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, Notions and 
Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



Alumni and Former Students. 

Miss Dahl, '01, from Jewell county, is here 
visiting her sister, Miss Dahl, freshman. 

Mr. Will Wilkinson, M)5, who has been lo- 
cated in Wichita for some time, is now located 
in California. 

A. Y. Turner, '05, professor of agriculture 
in the Norton high school, was visiting ahout 
College Monday. 

Phil. S. Creager, '01, died Friday morning 
at South Side hospital in Kansas City, ot ap- 
pendicitis. Mr. Creager had been for twelve 
years telegraph editor of the Kanm» City Jour' 
ntd and was one of the best-known newspaper 
men in the west. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
r tional li;uik Building. 

Porcelain bath tabs tine tine cigars and toilet articles 



Just So 



The Tellow who wants 
things "Just so" wants to see 

The 

"SUFFOLK" 
SACK 
SUIT 

"Put uj>" for the particu- 
lar! Style kinks that are 
welcome stunts to the man 
of taste. 

Men's perfect-fitting union 
suits, Si to $2.50. 

Men's new sailors, $1 to $4. 

New sort shirts, 75c to $2. 

When are you 
coming In? 




Copyright 1906 

B. Kupoenheimtsr & Co, 

Chicago 



i 



E. L. Knostman 



K. S. A. C. Directory. 

HAMILTON SOCIETY, 

President c. E. Davis 

Vice-president a. D. Hollowav 

Secretary c. (J. Nevins 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o clock in north society 
hall. 

WEHNTKH HOCIBTY. 

President W.A.Conner 

Vice-president F. W. Caldwell 

Secretary j, e Brock 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in south society 
hall. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY. 

President K , w . Matherlv 

Vice-president Anna To! in 

Secretary .................... Walter Zahnly 

Meets in south society hall at 2:00 p. m. 

FRANK LIN SOCIETY. 

President E . L. Shattuck 

Vice-president A Imira Ken- 
Secretary 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 7:130 p. m. 

IONIAN SOCIETY. 

SSHS&i^ AlmaMcRae 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary ... Blanche Kobertson 

Meets in north society hall Saturday at 2:45 p. m. 

EDHODELPHIAN SOCIETY. 

President Oabrielia Venard 

SESSS* 611 * • Marie Coons 

secretary Arhkh I »vic 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 2:45 p. m 

Y. M. C. A. 

President * r» wnii,. «,.,., 

SSff M :::::;;7' ::::;::::;;:: ^S 

General Secretary w" ' w" mw* It, 

Prayer-meeting. Thursday evening.' 6:4$. ***—*** 

Y. W. C. A. 

President Flora Hi ni 

si^r^f ent ■ •'•'• 'V.MargaVerdunninKhani 

aSSMUei^::::::;;;;;;:;:; EU £K 

Weekly meeting during noon hour' each' Saturday jn 
south society hall. The Home. 617 Manhattan Ave 

ENGINEERS' ASSOCIATION. 

President , T ,.„, 

S^ dent ^^v::.v:;:;:;:;s^ith J Faris 

secreiarj w w f ... r i„.. n 

Meets Saturday evening in C 60 at 7:30.'' Sanson 

AUKICULTURAL ASSOCIATION. 

President w . *,<.!,. - . 

Vice-president ,. w «Sr5&£I 

Secretary Watkins 

" Meets Saturday at' 2-30 in Ag. Hall". W * *' Gernert 

President «»™ ibociai-ioii. 

Vice-president ."" k"ftfcJSH 

Secretary niftSSZSl 

General Manager... ,""\ IWoY'tES! 

Meets at call of the president. 

GIRLS' ROOTERS' CLUB. 

President _ .. „ 

Vice-nresident » Boline Hanson 

Secretary Margaret Cunningham 

Leader....''.".". */' ..Grace Hawkins 

Catherine Ward 

BOT8' ROOTERS' CL0R. 

Chairman . _ _ „ 

Vice-chairman.. A. D Holloway 

Secretary.... ^ J -,?-. c ? xen 

Treasurer.....; a H WUber 

Meets at the call of the' Sift 



17 



I 



! 



71 



"THE OLD RELIABLE 



J» 



.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

. . Candies . . 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



JLt 



Phone 167 




We Sell 

THE BEST 



**r 



All Kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Fountain: 



Everything Up- to- Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
ICE CREAM SODAS __ 



L- 



^ ■ i 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



fl 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. ^ If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
^ Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. €]| Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and ll Drumm Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Yonville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 



I 
I 



k| 



rJ 



,..,; 




ur Young Men's 




WE TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Clothes for the Young Man from 16 to 20 years of age. Our suits 
have the desired amount of style in cut and make-up, while the fabrics 
are the most appropriate. We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we have made ready for them 

You'll Find Our Suits Different 

They are $10.00, $12.50, $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 and $22.00. 



i_ 



W. S. ELLIOT 



312 

POYNTZ 

AVE. 






We Have Just Received 

correct, prices small A big showing in Wash Belts, including the "Alice 
Longworth." Six attractive styles at 10 cents. 

Our stock of BAGS includes the new shapes in Leather and WhitP 
Can ^p ;3S are / eU f ma , de - with strong framed Pricfs ^«nu and up 
i rhe q rSL ah ^ an( ! ?? tra hl S h finish of our BACK- and SIDE-COMBS is wel 
LZoS 6 CyC ° mbSi9n0W ready ' and ver * ^tactTve at 2S 

The 



Big Racket 





/ 



Whe Students' Herald 



Published by the Student* 
of the Kantxn* Stat* Agri- 
cultural College X X 





IT 











FIRST-GRADE BUTTER 



That's what brings the top price! The trade demands it. The 
creameries want to furnish it. But to do so, they must have first* 
grade cream and an Increasing number of them are willing to pay a 
premium" to get It. Much of the cream now comes from farm 
separators, and It will increase, for the use of farm separators is in- 
creasing. The farm separator not only ssatcM the fanner more 
money, but it uvn him money, saves him time and makes his work 
easier. The situation is plain. The creamery mutt have first-grade 
cream and the farmer is bound to use the hand separator. There- 
fore the separator he uses must be capable el producing first-grade 
The improved 



I 



%, aiKsS*! i.*' 



U.S. CREAM 



SEPARATOR 



Can skim a heavier cream than any other and do It without clogging. 
The U. S. has the record of skimming a cream testing 65 per cent. 
And remember: The U. S. holds the World's Record for Clean Skli 



L 



I Gets the Most Cream and Will Deliver as Heavy a Cream as You Want 

Our fine new catalogue both explains and shows by accurate illustrations why 
the U. S. can skim First-grade cream, how it won the World's Record and why 
without question it is the easiest cared for, longest wearing and most profitable 
cream separator built to-day. Just say, "Send Catalogue No. 173," and you'll get 
it by return mall. 

VERMONT FARM HACHINE CO. 

BELLOWS PALLS, ....... VERHC T 



I 




Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



FOR 

Icecream and 
Icecream sodas 



GOTO 



IKE 



Manhattan 

Transfer 



Line 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturer! of 
Sweep and Power Peed Mills. Disc Cultivators. Safety 
Com Harvesters, Little Wonder Churns. Perfection 
Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves, Sash Weights, Chimney Cans 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs. Structural Iron Work. Stove Re- 
pairs, etc. ;: :: :; ;; :: :: :: .. 



MANHATTAN, 



KANSAS 



J. Q. A. She Id en 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 



Day end night baggage line, 
Meet all trains day or night, 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for ball 
gsmea, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date Itvery line. Bikes a 
specialty. :: :; :: » :: ;: 



PHONE 65 

H. J. Barnhouse , : . L w< Phimpt 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



453 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors boned. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 

L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 

113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry, 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N, Second St. ' 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, V EGETAB LES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 

For the BEST ICECREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NG'S 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Wait for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 

GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 




Any more pictures this 
term t alk quick 



WOLF'S 

STUDIO 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone 55 Phone 55 

ORFTS STUDIO 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Photo of any size or style. Souvenir Postal 

Cards of College and I. O, O. P. Home 

FOR SALE 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. G HOSTRUP, Prop, 

— . — _ 

GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. X X 

W, M. STINGLEY & CO. 



454 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



. ... -. TT> \KTTT T T» A V Vf\TT Tf» T 1 !? A TW ~\K7VTT1 — 




"tm/ftef&hidwCi 








W DEALEFlfe IN EVERYTHI 








. . ■■ 








Dry- Goods' 

Bargain Table 

We have placed on sale, this 


Krlppendorff-Dittmann Co's 


New Shirt- Waist Suits 






Ladies* 5 hoes 

They are the best you can buy. 


for Commencement. 

Dainty new grad nation 
gowns beautifully made and 






week, a variety of wash goods 


Ladies' Gymnasium 


trimmed. 






suitable for shirt-waists and 


Slippers 


Dozens of different designs 






suits, worth up to 50c per yard. 


$1 and $1.35 


in white shirt-waists. 






Your choice 
for 12 1-2 cents 


Baseball shoes. 

Mens All-America Shoes. 

Men's Educator Shoes. 


Stylish white duck and linen 
skirts. 

Pongee and taffetta silk 






per yard 


Men's Erica Shoes. 
Made by Rice & Hutchins. 


coats. 
New styles in caps. 






50-cent Silk Mulls for 37 cts. yd. 


None Better. 

Every Pair Warranted. 


McCall patterns, 10c and 15c 
None higher. 






We deliver (roods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting. 


writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 




Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 


Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready- to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 

1 



IF YOU'RE THINK- 
ING WHY NOT ACT 




An Irishman once bought an owl. believing it to 
be a parrot, and a few weeks afterwards a friend 
inquired if the bird had yet commenced to talk 
"Faith, no." said Pat. "but he is keeptn' up a devii 
of a thinkin'." 

We are glad to have you think of our dry-goods 
shoes and oxfords, ladies' and gents' furnishings 
and can make a visit to our store profitable to you! 

MOORE BROS- & CO, 



Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Kirksville.Mo.. 
and late of the Treating Staff of that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free of charge. :: ;; ;; : * :: . ; 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office. 134-2 

Bank Bldg.. Rooms 15-30. Res.. ISM 



PROFESSIONAL. 



DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 

34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 

Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 Re S . v^on*. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 41 1 House phone m 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room 16, Union National Bank Building 




Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan,, May 24, 1906. 



Number 35 



Curfew Shall Ring To-night. 

" You're out!' ' The game was over, our thou- 
sand rooters roared forth a Hip! Hip! Hooray! 
Kamdel--we could not allow the vanquished 
to retire without a jolly rousing cheer out of 
the fullness of our hearts. Every fellow was 
on good terms with his neigh ho r. Old Profes- 
sor Brumley so far forgot himself as to say to 
Captain Mabrey: "Well, Mabrey, you boys 
put up a good article of ball to-day." He for- 
got the Mr. But we had won even with a clear 
conscience and a clean record. We had de- 
feated a school who had long boasted to us and 
who already felt the laurel twig on her proud 
head. The game was played over at every sup- 
per table. It was too good to play only once. 
If Rag's hit in the sixth was omitted or Buck's 
steal in the fourth forgot, the game was stopped 
and begun over. 

"Spunk" Kobler was late to supper that night. 
In fact, he nor Val Rippey had any supper, for 
"Spunk" had had an idea and conveyed the 
same to Val. "Say, Val, we've won a good 
game and we ought to do something new to- 
night." 

"I've got you," said Val. "What'll it be? 
I can't think of anything new any more." 

"Well, I guess we couldn't do anything hetter 
than ring the bell to-night. If we could get a 
window open or something like that we could 
work it all right." 

"I've got her, 'Spunk.' We'll go up before 
they lock up and hide in the basement, then have 
a gang come up about ten or half-past and 
we'll ring till we get tired. I could ring the 
old bell while the rest of the gang crowded 
around and kindo' talked to the janitor. It 
won't make any difference if we are caught. ' ' 

As the boys walked up the street laying their 
plans Val dodged in to see Beaut Workman, 
and 'Spunk' rounded up a few more, and then 
the two hurried up on the hill before the doors 



would be locked. Everything was easy and the 
pair got out of sight. 

"D'you think they will come back this way, 
Val? Maybe we better get out through here to 
this window," said "Spunk" in a breathless 
whisper, 

"Can we find our way back here in the dark, 
'Spunk?' " gasped Val. 

"Come on, I see Rountree coming." And 
they dived through the cobwebs. 

"'Spunk,' how long is an hour?" 

"Sixty minutes," said that gentleman. 

'"Wrong," said Val. "Its thirty-six hundred 
seeonds." 

"Guess you're right." 

It got dark and various noises were magni- 
fied an hundred diameters. The steam pipes 
would stretch and the tloor groan. A whisper 
sounded like a bugle call. The watches ticked 
all the time. By a moonbeam that sneaked in 
through a crack, the same watches were con- 
sulted every ten minutes until ten o'clock was 
registered. Then the other fellows came. A 
cautious approach to the old bell rope and 
then the town knew. The sleepy ones listened 
and wondered. Some fellow in the crowd got 
nervous, kicked a box over, and then they 
stampeded. The gang stopped when the cam- 
pus had been put back upon the hill. No one 
had wanted to run. It was all a mistake, and 
yet they had run; that couldn't be denied. 

Soon came a swift messenger, Shade Cousley, 
with the startling news that Ape Wagner was 
captured. 

The company turned about and marched back 
up the hill with a stern purpose to do or die. 
Ape was a prisoner in the janitors office. The 
boys threatened and pleaded by terms, but the 
grim, old janitor was stern. He had sent a 
fleet courier to the governor. When he re- 
turned they would know. As the old clock down 
town tolled off twelve bells, the courier re- 



456 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



turned. He swung a reprieve above his head 
and a great shout went up from the rescuers. 
Ape was released, and the crowd scattered like 
shadows. To this da.v Ape is noted for his 
bravery and la/yness. 



Websters. 

We were called to order at a time as late as 
usual. The few that were plucky enough to re- 
sist the charms that nature had placed in their 




way, in the form of cool breezes scented with 
the perfume of flowers, and that indefinable 
longing for the pleasure of a lady friend's com- 
pany, took their seats with sighs accompanied 
by facial expressions which told plainer than 
words that they sincerely wished the charms to 
which they were exposed had been irresistible. 

The program, in which several of our new 
members appeared for the first time, did credit 
to the society. The features deserving mention 
were: Discussion by Mr. Melliam, in which he 
told us of the future of alcohol. The debate, 
"Resolved, That athletes should not be required 
to take the mid-term exams.," argued nega- 
tively by M. I. Stauffer and affirmatively by 
E. Kuppar, resulted in a victory for the former. 
Mr. MeCray's essay, in which he made "The 
Purples'" famous mascot do some very lively 
talking on his own account, deserves special 
mention. 

After recess we entered upon a business ses- 
sion, the details of which I will not mention 
further than that J. R. Coxen was granted the 
pleasure of bringing his lady friends to soci- 
ety, providing the hall is large enough to ac- 
commodate them. s. w. c. 

Burodeiphtans. 
Roll-call was answered to by quotations 
from Ernest Seton-Thompson. Cecil Barnett 
favored the society with a piano solo and 
responded to a hearty encore. Wilma Evans 
gave a biography of Seton-Thompson, and 
Ethel Barber a sketch of ttis writings. Mabel 
Bower gave a review of Edgerton Castle's 



latest hook, "Young April," Miss Farrar 
favored the society with a vocal solo, accom- 
panied by Hallie Smith. Miss Margaret Cop- 
ley gave a fine recitation for Reva Cree. Miss 
Davidson, Miss Selby and Miss Neal were 
initiated menders of the society. After the 
usual business session we adjourned. . 

_——_—_ w ' Al D ' 

Ionian Society, 

When the society was called to order by 
Hres. Alma MeRae the attendance did not look 
very promising, but the 1ml! soon filled. An 
important feature of the day seemed to be play- 
ing "hide-and-go-seek," and while one mem- 
ber went to seek it the time was passed with 
music. 

News by (J race Hull told us of events occur- 
ring in K. S. A. C, IT. S., Japan, etc. An 
essay on the "Mission of Woman," by Julia 
Spohr, proved very instructive. The "Oracle" 
and a parliamentary qui/,, interspersed with 
music, followed. A play of three acts, you may 
guess its name, scored a decided success. A 
garrulous and complaining old lady was real- 
istically rendered by Mamie Frey, though the 
character as represented would certainly act as 
a red flag to any young men contemplating 
matrimony. A pleasant part added to the pro- 
gram was a talk by a former member of the 
society, Winnifred Johnson. A lively business 
session with critic's report closed the meeting. 
■_ K. M. N. 

Resolutions. 
WHEREAS, death has taken from among us 
our beloved friend and classmate, Kdward J. 
Finley, be it 

Itewlved, that the class of '(*) do extend their 
sincere sympathy to his bereaved parents and 
relatives, and he it further 

liexolred, that a copy of these resolutions Ite 
sent to his parents and that a copy be published 
in the Students' herald and in his home 
paper. ELIZABETH Turner 

Reva Cree 
H. B. Johnson. 



Wee Club Trip. 

Our Glee Club packed up its music last Satur- 
day and went to Leonardville: that is, all the 
members went hut Garver. He gave several 
reasons for his missing the train, but the only 
reason appearing plausible is that he overslept. 

Harry Oman, '07, met them at Riley and 
drove them over to a farm house where the best 
supper was served that a College student ever 
could wish for. We can all imagine what the 
chicken, potato croquets, new peas, etc., tasted 
like. Professor Valley wandered about, com- 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



457 



pigmenting* the farmer on his great ability in 
"polishing" mules, calling a turkey hen a 
gobbler, amusing the boys, and enjoying him- 
self in general. One" thing was determined 
definitely, however, and that is that L. C. 
Morgan is a haggage man as well as a ladies* 
man. He was certainly very attentive to 
business. 

At Jjeonardville a small audience poorly 
appreciated the concert, which was given as 
well as the accommodations would permit. 
After the concert the remainder of the time was 
spent in giving the College yells and in sere- 
nading the nearby residents until train time. 

Everybody enjoyed themselves greatly, and 
the Club attrihutes all of its good time to its 
old member, Harry Oman. Professor Valley, 
Gertrude Kakin and Gertrude Hilliard accom- 
panied the Glee Club. 



Hatnps, 

Society was called to order by Vice-president 
Hoi low ay. After roll-call we were led in de- 
votion hy W. T. MeOall. We then listened to 
an experiment hy J. S. Montgomery on "Spoon- 
ology." Joe assured us that he had the hearty 
support of several Io*m. in carrying out the 
said experiment. The Hamilton "Recorder" 
was presented by K. L. Adams. It was quite 
spicy and original, which are the character- 
istics of all of Mr. Adams' productions in so- 
ciety. H. E. Cate introduced the Franklin 
Whistling Quartet. That their number was ap- 
preciated by the audience was shown by the 
hearty encore which they received. "Papa" 
Whipple then criticised. 

After recess we enjoyed quite a lively busi- 
ness session, but broke the record by adjourn- 
ing before the lights went out. J. M. R. 



Franklins. 

Vice-president Kerr was queen of the Frank- 
lin hive Saturday night. You could hear the 
hum of the Franks, from 8 o'clock until the 
lights went out. Under program, Pring Ny- 
strom edited a good number of the "Spectator." 
Miss Rickman entertained us with a vocal solo. 
Mr. Craton, with the assistance of a real live 
Irishman, displayed some of the "Tommie 
White" methods of grafting. Donley and 
Baird by recitations, and Brown, Garrity, 
Heinricks and Klder, in a debate as to whether 
or not students should have a representative in 
Faculty meetings, proved that they were not 
drones in society. The Frank, male quartet 
presented, "Bye, K. U., Bye O." Our busi- 
ness session ended in darkness, after which we 
strolled away home." C. G. 



Experiment 4-U-44. 

The following questions were propounded to 
Io's and the results given in a paper read to 
the Hamps: 

Describe your ideal of a husband? 

My ideal of a husband is a man tall or 
medium height, well built, with a walk which 
at once expresses ease and strength. I do not 
care for a handsome man, hut one who has a 
"good" face. Dark hair and brown eyes are 




preferred. All this without character is noth- 
ing. His character must be one which demands 
the respect as well as the love of his lady love. 

What would your choice of vocation be? 

"Housewife." 

"Cooking for a professor." 

"Making home happy. I think it would be 
perfectly lovely to set the table just for two 
and eat breakfast with the ideal herein before 
described." 

Why do you go to the Library? 

"To study human nature." 

"I always go to study, but often something 
unexpected happens to divert my attention." 

What change would you suggest in the social 
life of K. S. A. C? 

"A less number of receptions given by pro- 
fessors after mid-term and final." 

"I would cut out about half the things we go 

to." 
"That the students be more sincere and 

natural." 

Define "piking." 

"A headache. Best remedy, nine unexcused 
absences." 

What is your opinion of using ponies in ex- 
aminations? 

"a person who uses a pony is unfair both to 
himself and others. To himself because it will 
be harder for him to resist temptation the next 
time. To others for it sets a bad example. 

How do you feel after turning four fellows 
down during the same College hour? 

"I think all the fools are not dead yet." 




458 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 






"I feel like singing, "Who'll be the next?" 

"Never had the experience." 

Give a short recipe for keeping love from 
growing cohl. 

"Stick closer than a brother." 

"Select a warm evening. The gentleman 
should place his hands within his pockets 
while the lady sits at the far end of the porch 
seat. Set away to chill, being careftd not to 
'jar.'" ' 



John. 

I shouldn't cure to jrive offense. 

I never care to boast. 
Hut of all the men I ever met 

I like my John the most. 

I know looks aren't essential - hut 

John it a handsome man 
( You mifht us well have looks aloner 

With goodness when you can. > 

A little more than six feet tall, 

( About the proper size. ) 
With huir thut's rather lijrht than dark, 

And steady clear blue eyes. 

Inclined to be aesthetic. 

( Not too fashionably dressed ) 
He likes the things that I like. 

His tastes are of the best. 

While John is just about as tine 

As iiny man could be. 
Perhaps the nicest part of sill 

Is what he thinks of me. 

What, do you ask his name, 

Whose like you never mety 
Why John's my future husband 

Hut— I haven't found him yet, 

— Ionian, "Ortrrle. 



Athletic Notes. 

K. U. has won two out of four baseball games 
with Nebraska, tieing the third. 

St. Mary's boasts of having played nine in- 
tercollegiate baseball games without a defeat. 

Missouri University succeeded in lowering 
five of its former track records last Saturday. 
Their record on the one hundred yards now 
equals that made by Cain in the recent Baker 
meet, ten seconds fiat. 



Some Thoughts We've Been Thinking. 

People who have gone to the devil never 
write back about a happy home. 

We don't believe that Mike uses the lane 
after going to the trouble of making it wider. 

Do you think that "Jorgy" will board at the 
Coops, next year, and if not where will he be? 

Somebody swiped a Spanish cannon at Law- 
rence recently. Since they lifted Boscoe's uni- 
form we will believe most any old thing of that 
town. 

Some time ago a prisoner in the Concordia 
jail knocked the jailer down with a pillow and 
then made his getaway. We believe that if he 
bad used a pillow from our boarding house he 
would have surely killed that sheriff" 



We would like to know what the "profs" 
said about some of us at the recent Faculty 
love feast. 

We often wonder why it takes the Y. M. C. 
A. secretary so long to get his mail from the 
post-office. 

By the way some of them pair off who do 
you suggest as a suitable better half for 
"Shorty" Haines? 

Did you ever stop to think that the good 
Lord might have made you more homely and 

awkward than vou are? 




K. S. A. C. — the Largest Col 



We think Sol. was modest when he said, "I 
can't talk any better than Brookens, of K. U., 
can," even if said Brookens is a spellbinder 
with a reputation. 

When we hear a student wailing on an old 
horn or a fiddle we never know whether he has 
had indestructible biscuits for supper or 
whether he hates his roommate. 

The other day we heard a high-school gradu- 
ate mention the fact that "over the Alps lies 
Italy." We suppose by that that he expects 
to boss a gang of fiea -infested dagoes on the 
II. P. .some day. 

It must spell something when six different 
pairs of juniors get mad and jump on this 
paper because we said that "two prominent 
juniors had passed the first stage and their en- 
gagement would be announced soon." 

We heard one of the boys say some time ago 
that he was going to sell views this summer for 
the sake of the experience he would get. We 
don't usually bet, but its dollars to the hole in 
a doughnut that the young man gets all he 
wants. Dodd Gaston's 43rd Cousin. 



Man proposes and woman forecloses. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



459 



Lost One to K. U. 

Over one thousand rooters witnessed the 
second defeat o'f our baseball team by a State 
college aggregation. The Jayhawkers trimmed 
the farmers' beards to the tune of B to 4, but at 
no time was the game lost until "Maxim 
Gorky" called a halt. The game was inter- 
spersed with good individual playing on the 
part of the Jayhawkers and juicy errors by the 
farmers. Choppy was on the slab for Mike's 
aggregation, while Hoffman delivered the 
pellets for the visitors, and made good his 
hoodoo. Both pitchers were hit freely, and 



* 












•4 .. .,£V: 


- ■-- . • 


PT* 1: i 








. at 



on Hoffman's error. Herb, elevated one of 
the artist's slants until it was good for two 
sacks, scoring Porter. Cunningham and Herb, 
came in on Mai Ion's two-bagger. Al. Strong 
sent a rib-digger to Hetherington who made a 
neat catch and, finding Carl off his station, 
promptly helped himself to an unassisted 
double. These were the last scores made by 
the farmers. 

Not until the fourth inning did the Jay- 
hawkers enter the run column. Bloss started 
it with a single and Young- followed with a 
sacrifice which assisted him in reaching first, 
Justus tapped the pellet for two sacks and let 
the anxious visitors in. 

In the fifth Johnson hit and, on an easy one 
by Bloss and some juicy errors by the farmers, 
claimed a place in the run column. In the 
seventh spasm Captain Johnson again jarred 
the sand out of the farmers' eyes by tapping 
one of Choppy 's side- wheelers for a three- 
bagger. Young brought Johnson in and 
Brookens did the brotherly act in inviting 
Young home. In the eighth, Wilson made 
first while Mallon took it easy. He came in 
for the sixth and last run on more of that juicy 
fruit. 

The score: 



lege of ite Kind in the World. 



while the farmers succeeded in bunching their 
connections fairly well they allowed the game 
to be lost by loose playing. Choppy 's shoulder 
troubled him after the third inning and allowed 
the visitors to make opportune hits. These, 
spiced with poor support, gave the visitors a 
lead which was not overcome. The hoys at 
times played sleepy ball. Al. Strong failed 
to put up his usual good game and made 
several expensive errors. Others offended to 
a less degree. 

The farmers started things in the second 
inning when Cave connected with one of Mr. 
Hoffman's benderinos and claimed two sacks, 
going to third on Brookens' passed ball. 
Porter hit and scored Cave. No more runs 
were allowed the Royal Purple until the seventh 
inning, but Mr. Hoffman sat up and took 
notice in the third in time to prevent a list of 
fatalities. In this inning Choppy tapped the 
sphere over Johnson's head and made good. 
Herb. Strong took his pick from the pellet 
pusher's assortment, and Mallon caught the 
spirit and did likewise. The next two up failed 
to hit, leaving the bases full. 

The seventh spasm was started when Porter 
got hit. Sol. sacrificed but annexed Station 1 



K. u. 

Johnson (Cant.). 3b • 

Hetherlntrton. 2b 

Bloss. cf 

Younsr, lb 

Brookens , c , 

Justus, rf 

Bailey, ss 

Wilson. If 

Hoffman, p 

Totals* 37 



AH 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5 
4 
4 
4 



It 

2 



H 
3 



RH PO 







1 3 



2 






1 



8 
2 
1 



1 





6 13 



1 

1 
I 
I 

II 
(1 
(l 


I 



6 
1 

6 
9 
2 
2 

1 
27 



K. S. A. C. AB 

H. Stromr.lf 4 

Mallon. 3b 3 

Al. Strong, cf 4 

Cave, 2b 3 

Miller, c 4 

Haynes. lb 4 

Porter, rf • 

CunninRham (Capt.). ss 2 

Coldwell. p 3 

Totals 30 

By innings: 



a 

l 
o 
o 
i 




1 
1 


4 



HH PO 
2 



1 


1 


2 


1 

7 










1 
I 

2 



1 

3 
1 
6 
11 
1 
2 


27 



A 


8 

(I 
(I 

8 
1 




A 


2 

3 



2 
1 

H 



K 








II 



2 

2 

K 



3 

1 
1 
1 
1 




K TJ . ..0—0—0—2—1—0—2- 

K. S. A. C 0-1-0-0-0-0-3 



K II K 

-1-0=8 13 I 
-0-0=4 7 7 



Instead of the annual hair-cutting war be- 
tween the freshmen and sophomores of the 
University of Michigan, which has caused 
many serious injuries, it has been decided to 
have a tug of war across the Huron river. One 
hundred men will be chosen from each class 
and stationed on opposite sides of the river. 
A long rope will be used and one class or the 
other will be dragged through the river. —Ex. 

" Money talks, but its most frequent word is 
good-by . ' ' — Warrmi. 









460 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 







Owe Cultivate Hi* 

OWM 0INHA *+• 

'Printed In College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rules: One dollar a year. In advance. 
Single copies, Hve cents. 

Q, K. Whipplr. '07 Edltor-ln-chlef 

GBOVBB Kahl, "07 Husin ess Manager 

May CitiPKiNO. '07 Literary Editor 

L. E. GUSTOH. 'OH Local Editor 

S. W. <'iinnin<;ham. 'OS ..Exchange Editor 

H. It. HiLLMAN.'or .....Assoc. Business Manager 

.1. EL Hiokk. 'OH Subscription Manager 

A H ai*SuIS? f ■ Assoc - Locttl mi tors 

Ei.i/ahkth S vvkkt. '04 Alumni Editor 

o. W. Wkavkk. 'ok. ReiMirter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
shun Id be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red murk ucross this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and (bat you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Kuzahkth Swekt. '(H. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any Information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., May 24, 1906. 



There is ti subscription being taken to help 
defray the expenses of the band on the corning 
excursion. They show the right spirit in offer- 
ing to go as a band. Encumbered with their 
instruments and uniforms they can't enjoy life 
as the rest of us. So let's dig up! 

Speaking of ruts and habits, that practice of 
perforating the tin cups at the College well is 
the limit. It doesn't amount to much, only the 
discomfort of one thousand students daily. 
We are willing to give a liberal reward to the 
person who can discover the reason for so 
mutilating those cups. 

To some of the students, it is surely unjust 
to have the forty-live minutes intermissions 
called classes. A fellow only gets fairly 
started in a conversation with his lady friend 
until the hell rudely breaks in. With admira- 
ble persistence there are, however, several 
couples who manage to visit with each other 
about three hours each morning. If this is 
profitable it is anyway very seltish. One has 
suggested that you take a straight course in 
spoonology and never mind the other "olo- 
gies." 



We should have a good excursion to Topeka 
next Monday. The rate is so low that most of 
us can afford it. It will be a great advertise- 
ment to our school and a great recreation for 
us, besides the backing we will give to the 
track team. The meet will be worth while and 
we can't afford to miss it. 



Near the close of a most successful athletic 
year the students who have so ardently sup- 
ported our teams have l>egun to quit. We 
hate to believe it possible, but there are cir- 
cumstances to hear out the statement. The 
parade Monday did not look like old times. 
The rooting on the same day was evidence of a 
slump in pride. Why can't the fellows keep 
awake and make a showing that will not look 
like a failure at the last? 



The numbers of special music given each 
Saturday morning at chapel are very enter- 
taining, and yet are they not essentially re- 
ligious and are they not given as a part of the 
religious exercises? Now, if this be true why 
do we applaud the number just as we would a 
humorous selection? At no other school in the 
State do the students applaud such numbers. 
Would we think of indulging in a vigorous 
hand-clapping after the solo on Sunday morn- 
ing? If this practice were a measure of appre- 
ciation of the audience it would be excusable, 
but it is undoubtedly no criterion of apprecia- 
tion. It is simply a habit or custom that has 
more arguments against than for it. Do not 
hastily condemn this article, but let us reason 
together and discontinue this custom of ap- 
plause on such occasions if it is improper. 



Odds and Ends. 

Of two evils choose neither. 

Most men if weighed would be found want- 
ing—the earth. 

To disturb the happiness of another is not 
the right of any man.— .Ex. 

Nothing can be hostile to religion which is 
agreeable to just ice. —GUtihtttme. 

Happiness, an exception to the rule that the 
demand always creates a supply. 

Slumber not in the tents of your fathers. The 
worldis advancing. Advance with it! Muzzim. 

Oaptain (to company)— "When I say 'Halt' 
put the foot that is on the ground beside ■the 
one that is in the air and remain motionless." 

The highest bridge in the world is that in 
south Africa over the Zambesi river. It Is 420 
feet above the rushing waters. The structure 
stretches half a mile over the gorge. u 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



461 




Mav 2ft- 
May 2T- 
Mav 2H 
May 29 
May 29 

classes. 
Mav -to 
May 30- 
May 31 

Corps. 
June 2 



Coming Events. 

Baseball with Friends. 
Dadisman, Y. M. C. A. Parlors. 
Excursion to Topeka. 
Jewell county excursion. 
-Kxhihition drill by gymnasium 

Baseball with Washburn. 
-Holiday, Decoration Day. 
-Regular meeting Old Maids' Relief 

Track meet with K. U. 



For graduation gifts go to Askren's Jewelry 
Store where you find the large assortment 
and the new, up-to-date goods. 



The doubles of the tennis tournament will be 
played off this week. 

The "Old Maids' Relief Corps" was enter- 
tained Saturday evening. 

Miss Ruby Deaver has been visiting on Col- 
lege Hill for several days. 

Miss Augspurger enjoyed a visit from her 
sister, of Illinois, last week. 

Assistants Goss and Jackson fathered a line 
party at the circus last week. 

Have you noticed Shuler's young mustache? 
It beats side-burns all hollow. 

Miss Josie Holland spent Sunday in the 
country with Miss Chloe Willis. 

M. h. Parsons is being visited by his father 
from Minneapolis, Kan., this week. 

Ivor Davies' brother, of Eskridge, Kan., 
visited him for a few days last week. 

James Garver missed his train and did not 
get to go with the Glee Club Saturday. 

General Caldwell, of Leavenworth, visited 
College and chapel last Friday morning. 

O. W, Weaver, commonly known as "Ollie," 
has been elected reporter for the Herald. 

The Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. are planning to 
send large delegations to the summer confer- 
ences. 

Jorgenson and Coxen went fishing up the Blue 
Monday morning. Rumor says that they got 
a bite. 

Martin Shuler went home Friday to attend 
the high school commencement exercises. His 
sister graduated. 

Beautiful assortment of K..8. A. C. Souve- 
nirs at Askren's. Just what you want for 
Graduation Gifts. 

The observation beehive of the Entomolog- 
ical Department is attracting considerable at- 
tention. The sides are of glass so that the 
bees may be seen at work. 



Kan., was 
bird fancier 



C. W. Miller, of Hays City, 
around College Monday. He is a 
and came in to see the pheasants. 

Asst. R. Fi. Eastman went to Huchinson last 
week to study the cooperative spraying exper- 
iments that are being made in that section. 

W.J. Brown was showing his father, from 
B'all River, Kan., around College Monday 
morning. He left for his home Monday eve- 
ning. 

Wanted: A young man to join the Old 
Maids' Relief Corps. Assistant under forty - 



seven years old preferred, 
ident. 



Doctor Goss, pres- 
4-11-44-T. F. Pd. 

It has been discovered where Boscoe's pen- 
nant, which he lost at K. U., is kept on exhibi- 
tion. It is in the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity 
room. 

The Shuler Club and the Coops, played a 
game of baseball in the City Park last Thurs- 
day. The result was 3 to in favor of the 
Coops. 

Miss Myra Jerome, of Kansas City, Kan., 
visited College and Kansas City friends Sun- 
day and Monday. She expects to enter College 
next fall. 

Van Smith comes up to College and com- 
mences work at 4:30 every morning. He is 
catching the festive curculio for the Hort. De- 
partment. 

The high school students of Manhattan had 
an interclass track meet in the City Park last 
Wednesday. Numerous revised College yells 
was the most interesting feature. 

Miss Edith Ingham, of Topeka, Kan., has 
enrolled in the Domestic Science summer, school. 
Miss Ingham is a senior at Washburn College 
this year and local editor of the H«sWj«i'ii 
Jteriew. 

The Zoology Department received some silk- 
worm eggs from the Department of Agriculture 
last week. The eggs have hatched and the 
worms are working over time feeding on mul- 
berry leaves. 

Asst. George Jackson, of the German Depart- 
ment, has been offered the Chair of German at 
the Case School of Applied Sciences, Cleveland, 
Ohio. He will accept and will spend'the sum- 
mer resting and studying. 

James Coxen has resigned his position as 
Herald reporter. "Jim" has worked long 
and faithfully for the Herau>. The printers 
were always glad to get his neat, well-written 
copy. We are sorry to lose him. 

About eight young and giddy assistants went 
to a circus a few weeks ago and, not being sat- 
isfied with the gymnastics, tried a "few" iheru- 
selves as thev were walking home through the 
City Park. One of the regular professors was 
shocked and horrified to see the entire crowd 
plaving "leap-frog," and otherwise disporting 
themselves as little boys and girls should never 
do. Of course he told the rest of the "f acul- 
I ties," and now there is trouble in camp. 



462 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



K. U. track meet here on June 2. 

D H. ("lark will do good typewriting cheaply. 

The freshmen will edit the Herald next week. 

Go to D. H. Clark, Parkview Hospital, for 
typewriting. 

D. H. Clark does first-class typewriting at 
reasonable rates. 

Miss Mary Gaden enjoyed a visit from her 
sister last Friday. 

Capttan Shaffer appeared last Sunday re- 
splendent in his white duck uniform. 

Clinton Zercher, of Topeka, visited E. S. 
Taft, '08, during the first part of the week. 

A pen of young pheasants were nn exhibition 
in the zoological class room last Saturday. 

Misses Justin and Hill chased a few locals 
into our ever appreciative note book Tuesday. 

Don't forget the excursion to Topeka next 
Monday. The Herald staff is going if it has 
to walk. 

Seven couples of College students enjoyed a 
May morning breakfast on Bluemont last 
Monday. 

Beautiful assortment of K. S. A. C. Souve- 
nirs at Askren's. Just what you want for 
Graduation Gifts. 

What am I going to do this summer? is the 
question that is bothering quite a large number 
of young men now. 

The competitive drill between the companies 
of the cadet battalion will be held June 5 at the 
regular drill hour. 

The business houses on Poyntz Avenue have 
improved their appearance by putting up some 
new canvas awnings. 

Walter Foster had several enjoyable exper- 
iences the other night hanging May baskets 
He was dressed as a girl. 

For graduation gifts go to Askren's Jewelry 
Store where you find the large assortment 
and the new, up-to-date goods. 

An inquiry made in the Library while two 
girls were studying Civics.-'* What is a case, 
Mary?" "Oh! go ask Jack Ryan." 

The Jewell county excursion has been post- 
poned until June H. The railroad could not 
furnish a train on the date first set. 

The Dairy Department is making casein for 
use in the poultry department. This is the 
best food used so far to make hens lay. 

v M xl' J°hn Dadisman, college secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. for Kansas, will speak to the yountr 
men of the College next Sunday at 3:30. 

It has been definitely decided that the Emno- 
ria tractmeets have been called off on account of 
conflicting dates. We will meet both Normal 
and Emporia at Topeka. normal 

Miss Delia Wing, student here last year and 
Charles Honeywell were married at He bridSs 
home near Dianas, Kan., May 2. They went 
to housekeeping at once on the groom's farm 
in that neighborhood. * m s larm 



E. C. Farrar got too many kinds of refresh- 
ments on the Glee Club trip, and as a result 
was out of College Monday and Tuesday. 

Tom White says that the local about "doir- 
proof trousers" is not true, and gives as proof 
that he has not bought any trousers for over a 
year. 

George Vance and daughter Irma, of Morrill 
Kan,, were seeing the sights around College 
1 uesday. Miss Vance expects to take summer- 
school work here. 

The track team is in fine condition. There 
is one trouble, however— several of the hovs 
want to lake their girls to the ball games and 
then not practice. 

Coach Melick announces that Rdelhlute will 
run the 440 dash and Thurston the 2-mile run 
in addition to the events they participated in 
at the Baker meet. 

A lawn fete, consisting of May- pole dances, 
dnll^ rose drill, etc., will be given by 
the Physical Training Department on May 29 
4:30 p m., on the east campus. All students 
invited. 

Letzten Donner^tag kam ein junger Deutscher 
zurn Hause von Frau und Herr Cortelyou Fr 
kann noch nicht englisch sprechen, und er hat 
rotes Haar. Wir gratulieren Sie, Herr Cor- 
telyou Warum komraen Sie nicht Mehr in die 
cap pel ie . 

A sample of the new cadet uniform that will 
be worn next year may be seen in the Presi- 
dent s office at any time now. It is of the 
regu ation West Point cadet gray with grav 
bell-top cap. , s J 

Those who have entered in the tennis tourna- 
ment of doubles are: Wilson, Haan; Evans 
Sherman; Morgan, Policy; Greeley, Worden- 
Sviwensky, Jackson; Cave, Winnie- Meener' 
Peairs;Carr, Berkeley; Ross, Fa?ra ' LonX 
Andrews; Coxen, Whipple; Hill, Topping. ' 

church RevT fy nS . ft Con ^gational 
SSSntl « K H : Gelvi n lectured to a good- 

tS v!?i le ™ eo !! A Yankee in Buras ' Land." 
himJlf t Dth ! mewas Reverend Gelvin 
SkI T ° fP ent .V eap in the University of 
w r fh - (l S , COttlsh eustoms a °d the country 
UUstra^ ma °ner and 

iiK« 2*r th 9tere °Pt»can views. Those 
who heard it pronounced it as good or better 

tef^sr 8 that have appea - d " 

uSd fh7K.u nd and r K §T?' 2± ^T 

carp-fi^ ™. . • °- . A - C. A kindly and 

Kansas as K S A r ,L hold . ln <? » s ]"ny 

SWteSTk*" served WR'h 

morrow we mTirhr LT h gom * "> rain ™> «>e 
past nine * ' Dot have * one h °°>e at half- 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



463 






J SNAPPY SUITS 



FROM THE WORLD'S 
BEST MAKERS X, 



9 

5 



-%• 



* 

5 

t 



FOOTWEAR 

Latest 

Fads 



Step in for a moment and be convinced that our 
store is the place to get the earliest points on 
JUST WHAT TO WEAR 

JOHN COONS, of Course 



Hot 
Weather 
SHIRTS 



5 



Alumni and Former Students. 

Ethel Clemons, '05, went to Zeandale last 
week for a visit with Elva Akin, *05. 

C. W. Fryhofer, '05, is at Manchester, la., 
inspecting butter for the U. S. navy. 

Clara Pancake, '03, expects to take up grad- 
uate work in D. S. for the remainder of the 
term. 

A. N. H. Beeman, '05, of the 3fuwnu*f and 
Kanms Farmer, was about College a few days 
last week. 

Invitations are out for the wedding of Anna 
O'Daniel, '03, and Edd Amos, '02, at the Bap- 
tist church, on June sixth. 

Ula Dow, '05, who has been taking graduate 
work at Framinghara, Mass., will be on the 
summer-school teaching force here. 

H. M. Bainer, '00, has been elected professor 
of farm engineering at the Colorado Agri- 
cultural College, Fort Collins, Colo. 

Winifred Johnson, '05, who has been keeping 
house for her father at their home near Solo- 
mon Rapids, visited College friends last week. 

A. F. Turner, '05, professor of agriculture in 
the Norton county High School, paid his alma 
mater a short visit recently. He says he works 
thirteen months in the year. 

Crete Spencer, Blanche Stevens, Nelle Davis, 
Jessie Sweet, Eva Burtner and Winifred John- 
son, all '05, spent a pleasant evening at the 
home of Miss Spencer in honor of Miss John- 
son last Saturday. 

Judging from the postals received by her 
Manhattan friends, Edith (Huntress) Rhoades, 
'01, and Wm. J. Rhoades, '97, were warmly 
and wonderfully received by their Olathe 
friends, and are now comfortably located in 
their new home. 

The "Gamma Iota Sigma" girls spent the 
evening of their regular monthly meeting in 
the park, and did ample justice to the products 
of some of their D. S. training. Seventeen of 
the twenty-four resident graduate Ionians were 
present, and the constitution was formally 
adopted and signed. After the close of the 
business session a general good time was in- 
dulged in until darkness said it was time to 
adjourn. 



Dr. H. A. Brous, '74, died Thursday, May 
10, at his home near Manhattan. While yet a 
young man he attained an eminent rank as a 
physician and surgeon at Philadelphia. By 
an accidental wound while performing an oper- 
ation he was inoculated with a poison that 
made him a helpless cripple and ruined his life. 
He was always patient. He is survived by his 
wife. 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs tine Itneclgarsmnd toilet articles 



■_ ^ * — - ^ ; w . U ^~^ M — \ 




THE 



HERALD 

GIVES 



Spicy and Complete "write-ups" of 
all the baseball games. 

If you really want to keep up on 
athletic events It will pay you to 
subscribe. DO IT NOW! :: :; :: 



$1 PER YEAR 




464 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



New and 2g&™ 
School Books 



R. E. LOFINCK 



« .„ Spectacles 
Gold Pent 



College Text-Books Sporting Goods """^~~"^~~ 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College SuDDliea Notion* „a 
Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES ' N ° tl0ns and 



Irving Axelton and Madge Ruth McKeen 
were married Wednesday evening, May 16, at 
the bride's home near Keats. They will make 
their home near Randolph, Kan. 

Last week we neglected to mention the mar- 
riage of Miss Edith Huntress. '01, and William 

: *? h ^ de ?' ' 97 » of olat he, which took place 
at the Presbyterian church, Manhattan, Thurs- 
day evening, May ]0, at 8 o'clock, Reverend 
Gelvin performing the ceremonv. The ushers 
were the members of the G. A. L. S. The 
newly wedded couple were given a reception at 
the home of the bride's mother. The decora- 
tions were of ferns and carnations. Many out- 
of-town guests were present. Mr. Rhoades is 
vice-president of a bank in Olathe and the 
bride was, until a few weeks ago, our popular 
postmistress and executive clerk. They left on 
the midnight train for Olathe, where thev expect 
to go to housekeeping at once. The Herald 
extends congratulations. 

The Dairy Department is carrying on an ex- 
periment on the causes for variations in the 

A eS J S i? f *. Crea -^ se P arafc ed by hand separators. 
A bulletin will soon be published. 



Just So 



The fellow who wants 
things "Just so" wants to see 

The 

"SUFFOLK" 

SACK 
SUIT 

"Put up" for the particu- 
lar! Style kinks that are 
welcome sights to the man 
of taste. 

Men's perfect-fitting union 
suits, $1 to $2.50. 
Men's new sailors, $] to %4. 
New soft shirts, "5c to 12. 

When are you 
coining in? 




Copyright 1906 

B. Kupoenhslmer A Co. 

Chicago 



E. L. Knostman 



President. 



K, S. A. C. Directory. 

HAMILTON SOCIETY, 



C. E. Davis 



Vice-president . a"n iiTXi v ' 8 

Secretary Dj Holloway 

jj Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o : cioek to north sSfy 

WEBSTER SOCIETY. 

President wa^ 

president w <™ ^nSSSSE 

Secretary F - •?• S*i?_ we . u 



Meets Saturday evening at 7:'3o'o ; ciock in Boutfsoc'ietJ 



ALPHA BETA SOCIETY. 

President '....... w w ilt„*v , 

Vice-president.... E - W ; Mat £ e \' v 

Secretary .-.Anna Tolm 

Meets in south society hail' aY 2:00 p.m.' ' ' ' er Zahnly 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY. 

President ™ r a . m . 

Vice-president... * E. L Shattuck 

Secretary . w • ft r 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at' 7:30 p. m y,0r 



President. 



IONIAN SOCIETY. 



Vice-D resident » Alma MeRae 

Secretary Margaret Cunningham 

Meets in north society hali Saturday ?f JlS e p ^ bertson 

EURODELPHIAN SOCIETY. 

President ,,„ h . „ _ 

Vice-president "'" Gabriella Venard 

Secretary * • ■ • •• Marie Coons 

Meets in Franklin Hail' Saturda'y'ats'rWp'.'M Adah LeW ' 8 

T. M. C. A. 

President . _ _ _ 

Vice-president V * *«»"£!!? way 

Secretary ■ C.E. Whipple 

General Secretary V. '.'.'. «;■ '& • ^v Hu11 

Prayer-meeting. Thursday 'evening.' && McLean 

T. W. C. A. 

President... __ 

Vice-president V, ■ ■ Flora Hull 

Secretary * Margaret Cunningham 

General Secretary. " mjZrS ** 8 

ENGINEERS' ASSOCIATION 

President 

Vice-president .'. a j ; Ll J?° v 

Secretary * Smith Faris 

Meets Saturday evening i'n'ceo" at 7:30."'' W " W ' Carl80n 

AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION. 

President _. 

Vice-president . . . .' sj* • A-Conner 

Secretary ' W. E. Watkins 

Meets Saturday' at *•» in Ag. HaU*. W " B " GeTnert 

President ath ^tic association. 

Vice-president E. L. Adams 

Secretary ... A. D. Holloway 

General Manager ' ii/ c - E - Whipple 

Meets at call of the' president. Q " A ' Dean 

GIRLS' ROOTERS' CLUB. 

President 

Vice-president vv Boline Hanson 

Secretary .... Margaret Cunningham 

Leader.... Grace Hawkins 

Catherine Ward 

~. . mY *' HOOTERS' CLUB. 

Chairman 

Vice-chairman A. D. Holloway 

Secretary . . J. R. Coxen 

Treasurer. . B. H. Wilber 

Meets at the call of 'the' chairman. J ' K Brock 




s 



it 



la m 




"THE OLD RELIABLE 



If 



.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



I 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



Fountain: 



Phone 167 




W.SeU 

THE BEST 

vr- 



-All Kinds o: 



Ice C 



ream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
ICE CREAM SODAS 



I 



Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. fl If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase'/until [spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have halfOpaidJfor itself by spring! 
<I Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values Jare highest *J Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

77ie De Laval Separator \Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FP.ANCJ3CO 

9 and 11 Drumm Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

221 Youvllle Square 

TORONTO 

and TftYork Street 

WINNIPEG 

3M£MoDejemet Avenue 



T— V. - ' 



■ ■■ ■ m ■ .. ■ '<^*^y 



r 



Our Young Men's 




WE TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Clothes for the Young Man from 16 to 20 years of age. Our suits 
have the desired amount of style in eut and make-up, while the fabrics 
are the most appropriate. We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we have made ready for them 

You'll Find Our Suits Different 

They are $10.00, $12.50, $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 and $22.00. 



IW 



S. ELLIOT 



312 

POYNT2 

AVE. 



j 





We Have Just Received 

• Another shipment of the very latest styles in BELTS, including the 
Gold and Silver and the latest fads in Leather. Our line is complete, styles 
correct, prices small, A big showing in Wash Belts, including the "Alice 
Long worth." Six attractive styles at 10 cents. 

Our stock of BAGS includes the new shapes in Leather and White 
Canvas. They are well made, with strong frames. Prices 25 cents and up. 

The quality and extra high finish of our BACK- and SIDE-COMBS is well 
known. The line of Fancy Combs is now ready, and very attractive at 25 
cents to 98 cents. 

The 

Big Racket 






\ 



mmm 



■ 






HChe ^Students' Herald 



# , 




Freshman dumber 



** 



Published by the Students of the 
Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College 



,■» 






r.. v - 1 
ft 



K 




FIRST-GRADE BUTTER 



That's what brings the top prtoel The trade demands It. The 
creameries want to furniab it. But to do so, they mist hare Brst- 
t-rade ffw and an increasing number of then are wining to pay a 
"premium" to get It. Much of the cream now comes from farm 
separators, and it will Increase, for the use of farm separators to in- 
creasing The farm separator not only arnicas the farmer more 
money, but it ae^es him money, sates him time and makes his work 
easier. The situation to plain. The creamery mart hare first-grade 
cream and the fanner to hound to nee the hand separator, There- 
fore the separator be uses must he capable el 
The improved 



U.S. CREAM 



SEPARATOR 



Can skim a heavier cream than any other and do It wtthoot 



The TJ. S. has the record of skimming a cream testing 63 par < 
And remember: The U. S. holds the World's Record lor Clean 



1 Gets the Most Cream and Will Deliver as Heavy a Cream as You Want 

Oar fine new catalogue both explains and shows by accurate illustrations why 
the U. S. can skim First-grade cream, how It won the World's Record and why 
without question it Is the easiest cared for, longest wearing and most profitable 
cream separator built to-day. Just say, "Send Catalogue No. 178," and youTl get 
It by return mail. 

VERMONT FARM HACHINE CO. 



L; 



BELLOWS FALLS, 



VERHONT 






i 



j 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



FOR 

Ice-cream and 

Icecream sodas 



GOTO 



KE HOLBERT'S 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Maniificturert of 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. Mae Cultiratora. Safety 
Com Harvesters, little Wonder Churns, Perfection 
Lawn Swings. Oak Stores, Saab Weights. Chkdhey Caps, 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs, Structural Iron Work, Store Re- 
pairs, eto. :: :: :: ;: :: :; » » :: : . 

MANHATTAN, -:- -p. KANSAS 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pin*. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 




Day aadaight 

Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for ball 
game*, etc. Let as call 
your attention to ear up-to- 
date Urerg line. Bikea a 
specialty. ;: :: :; :i « % 



PHONE 65 

H. J. Barnhouse -:- ■ L W. PhiHipi 



J 



^^^^^^ 



■■■ 



» 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



465 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 

113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. fir P. Ry. 

Geo* T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, V EGETAB LES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 

For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NG'S 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Wait for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 

GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 




Any more pictures this 
term talk quick 




S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, . 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 

ORR'S STUDIO 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Photo of any size or style. Souvenir Postal 

Cards of College and 1. O. O. F. Home 

FOR SALE 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS Si .00 

302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop, 

GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 

offer you only the best, X X* 

W. M. STINGLEY & CO, 




466 



THE STUDENTS* HEKALD. 



= IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry-Goods' 

Bargain Table 


Krippendorff-Dittmann Co' 9 
Ladles' Shoes 

They are the best you can buy. 


New Shirt- Waist Suits 
for Commencement. 

Dainty new graduation 


We have placed on sale, this 




nowns beautifully made and 


week, a variety of wash (foods 


Ladies* Gymnasium 


trimmed. 


suitable for shirt-waists and 


Slippers 


Dozens of different designs 


suits, worth up to 50c per yard. 


$1 and $1.35 


In white shirt-waists. 


Your choice 
for 12 1-2 cents 


Baseball shoes. 

Men's All- America Shoes. 

Men's Educator Shoes. 


Stylish white duck and linen 
skirts. 

Pongee and taffetta silk 
coats. 


per yard 


Men's Erica Shoes. 






Made by Rice & Hutching. 


New styles in caps. 


50-cent Silk Mulls for 37 cts. yd. 


None Better. 


McCall patterns. 10c and 15c 




Every Pair Warranted. 


None higher. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-statrs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Heady- to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



IF YOU'RE THINK- 
ING WHY NOT ACT 




An Irishman once bought an owl, believing it to 
be a parrot, and a few weeks afterwards a friend 
inquired if the bird had yet commenced to talk, 
"Faith, no," said Pat, "but be is keepin' up a devil 
of a thinkin'." 

We are glad to have you think of our dry-goods, 
shoes and oxfords, ladies' and gents' furnishings, 
and can make a visit to our store profitable to you, 

MOORE BROS. & CO, 



Dr. A. F. Blanchard 

OSTEOPATH PHYSICIAN 

Graduate American School Osteopathy. Klrksville.Mo., 
and late of the Treating Staff or that School. Special 
attention given to Diseases of Women and Children. Ex- 
amination free of charge. :: :: :: :: :: :: 

OFFICE: Union National PHONE: Office, 134-2 

Bank Bldg.. Booms 15-20. Res.. 134-3 



PROFESSION A L. 



DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Office In Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room 16. Union National Bank Building 



The Students* Herald 



FRESHMAN NUMBER 



^KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE- 



VOLUME XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., May 31, 1906. 



Number 36 



Yenerat Sheridan's Ride, 

FA you ban vise, und ay tank you ban, 
You har bout Yeneral Sheridan; 
But muyhe you afnt remember the day 
Ven he yump on horse, an den he say; 
"Ay'm yust about tventy miles avay, 
Borne rebel fullers ban start bit; row 
Jn Vinchester. Ay aint know yust how, 
Hut ay tank dey yump on some Yankee guys, 
And trying to give dem gude black eyes." 

So Yeneral Sheridan hardese trims, 
And drank some coffee and eat some buns, 
An tal dis here land lord "Gude by, Yack ; 
Ay skol paying my bill ven ay come hack" 
Den he ride so fast that sune he say, 
" Val now ay ban saxteen miles away ! *' 
Dese cannons ban roaring gude and loud. 
It ban tough game for dis Yankee Crowd, 

Corporal Olson he-tol his pal, 

A y tank ve ban due to run lak hul ! 

So dey start to run. or else retreat, 

Dis ban noder name for gude cold feet ; 

And dey run so fast sun dey can go. 

Lak Russians running from dese Yaps, you know. 

"Yet " say Sheridan. " Yump old hoss ! 

Ay tank my soldiers get double cross 

Ay s'pose yure hoops getting purty sore. 

But ve only got 'bout sax miles more ! " 

Val.* Yeneral Sheridan meet his men. 
And he say, "its now yust halp past ten. 
Ay hope ay skol never go to heaven 
Ef dese rebel Svedes ain't licked by leven 
Yust turn around right in yure track ' 
Come on, you fullers ; we're going back ! " 
And you bet yure life dey vent hack, too. 
And put gude crimp in dis rebel crew, 
But soldiers ban careless sons-of-guns. 
And de Yeneral never settled for buns. 

— Anon, 

Ruth Paget 

CHAPTER I. 

'Twas a bright day in early autumn. The 

last rays of the sun glimmered through the 

trees, while the soft wind wafted the fragrance 

of the flowers over the lake at the foot of the 

garden. A large, old-fashioned house stood on 

a knoll that sloped gently back from the lake. 

The ivy and rose clambered over the large 

veranda, and shrubs grew in wild luxuriance 

in the garden. Rustic seats were arranged in 

the garden, some by the lake, some nearer the 

house. 
Through the trees the lake could be seen, 

and far beyond, the foothills rose to meet the 
mountains. Far away the water looked like a 
sheet of gold as it glistened in the sunlight, 
but near to the shore the large waterlilies 
changed it to silver. A boat is gliding 
among the lilies, and the occupants, a freckle- 
faced youth and a black-eyed maiden, are 



plucking the flowers and admiring their silvery 
chalices. Their happy, boisterous voices come 
across the garden, and an elderly lady and 
stately gentleman coming down the path pause 
to listen. 

The lady, who once was very beautiful, is 
proud and dignified. Her dress and manner 
tell of refinement as well as wealth. Her com- 
panion is a kind-looking man with blue eyes, 
and dark hair tlirough which gray is beginning 
to show. His Arm mouth and square chin por- 
tray decision, while his eyes twinkle with 
humor. 

"Awkward, well I should say so!" the lady 
said scornfully, as they continued their con- 
versation. "There, look at that!" as the girl 
in the boat, reaching for a lily, slipped, and 
would have fallen into the water hut for the 
dexterity of her companion. The boy cbided 
her for her carelessness, and the elder people 
continued their conversation. 

"Well, she will outgrow that if you send her 
to school and let her associate with other girls," 
the gentleman answered. He was evidently an 
agent for some school, and from the familiarity 
with which he addressed Mrs. Sherbeck he was 
an old acquaintance. "Let her get out and see 
something of the world, Martha. She has a 
beautiful face and a sweet voice and after a 
while she will outgrow this boisterousness. 
Then you will need never to regret that you 
took my advice. Give her an education, then 
let her try teaching as she said she wished to 
do." 

"Well Paul," she said thoughtfully, "I will 
try it although I haven't the confidence in 
Ruth that you have." 

And so it was settled. Ruth Paget was to 
leave this beautiful place and go to the Girls' 
Seminary at Montello. At an early age she 
had been left an orphan without friends or 
home. Martha Sherbeck, a proud, wealthy 
lady, gave her a home and, as she grew older, 
a little education. But Ruth's life had l>een 
deprived of the care and love that make a girl 
pure and gentle, and at sixteen we find her an 
overgrown girl, very awkward in the presence 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



469 



of her elders, but boisterous when with a few 
friends. 

She had a high, Intelligent forehead, coal- 
black eyes and hair, and a sensitive mouth. 
Her chin bespoke decision, as did her eyes. 
When she sang 1 her voice rose clear and sweet. 
And now she was to leave. She did not seem 
to regret it much. Her life here, although 
pleasant, had been devoid of the love and 
friendship that hinds a girl's heart to her home. 

So, on a heautiful September day she left it 
all liehind, and sped away to the little city of 
Montello. Here she was to stay for four years, 
only visiting her former home during the short 
summer vacation. After her school was over 
she was to try teaching. She had always 
talked of teaching and. at the advice of Paul 
Lewis, Mrs. S her heck had at last consented. 

Arriving at Montello she went to the Semi- 
nary at once. All arrangements being made, 
she was shown to her room, a cosy little room 
with only one occupant, a fair-haired girl of 
perhaps Until' s age. She was of slight build. 
Her smile assured Ruth of her welcome; but in 
spite of the girl's kindness Ruth was awkward 
and shy at first. At length, after she became 
acquainted with the other girls and the teach- 
ers her shyness left her, but she was still awk- 
ward. 

Her pretty face and kind, though sometimes 

boisterous, manner soon won her many warm 
friends among the girls, while her bright in- 
tellect gained the favor of her instructors. 
Thus we leave her for awhile installed in new 
surroundings, striving to get an education. 

CHAPTER II. 

Two years have passed since we left Ruth 
Paget at the beginning of her school life at the 
Seminary at Montello. It is a cold, blustery 
night in Noveml»er. The sky had heen dull 
and gray all day, but as evening came on the 
wind arose and a few feathery snowttakes came 
sifting through the air. The lights on the 
streets increase the blackness of the shadows. 
The wind blows fiercer each moment. A soli- 
tary form is seen beneath a light far down the 
street. It disappears in the darkness between, 
then reappears in the next circle of light. The 
man pauses a moment during a lull in the 
storm. As he raises his head, we recognize 
our freckle- faced friend, James Lower. He is 
no longer a youth but a tall, broad-shouldered 
man. But what has brought him out such a 
night as this? Ah! his uniform tells that. He 
is a messenger. Drawing his coat closer, he 
plunges again into the storm and is soon lost 
in the inky blackness of the night. He passes 
rapidly up the street and up. the steps at the 
dormitory. 



A maid answers his ring; he steps inside to 
get out of the storm and inquires for Ruth 
Paget. The maid goes in search of her. 
Through an open door soft strains of music, 
then the words of a song, float out to the tired 
man in the ball. Soft and low they fall, then 
full and rich. He starts as he recognizes the 
bird-like voice of the singer. He stepped to 
the door and rapped; the music instantly 
ceased and the door was opened by a slender 
girl with dark hair and eyes. How graceful 
and beautiful! It is difficult to recognize 
Ruth, so much has she changed from the 
awkward girl of sixteen. 

"Miss Paget, I believe," the messenger said. 
'Twas then that Ruth recognized James. 

"James Lower!" she exclaimed. "When 
did you come here? What are you doing?" 
and she asked him question after question 
without waiting for a reply until James inter- 
rupted. 

"Ruth, I have brought you sad news. Do 
not take it too hard. Remember I am your 
friend, and if you need any help send for me." 
He handed her a telegram, then went again 
into the storm. » 

Ruth tore open the telegram and read ; 
"Martha Sherbeck very ill. Come at once." 
Her cheek paled, but she did not utter a sound. 
She went to the matron and told her of her 
trouble, made a few hasty preparations, and 
left just in time to catch the late train. The 
storm was still raging violently when she 
reached the station near her home the next 
morning. A carriage was awaiting and upon 
inquiry the darky coachman said, "Missus died 
las' night. Her two boys dey coined yesterday, 
but missus done called for ye all de time." 
Then he gave the horses freedom of rein and 
they dashed ddwn the road at a mad pace. 

Poor Ruth! What should she do? Her bene- 
factress gone, her schooling not yet finished. 
Could she claim any protection and aid from 
the sons? No, never! She would leave the 
place after the funeral was over and make her 
own way in the world. These were the thoughts 
that passed through her mind during the ride. 

One warm afternoon in spring an agent was 
traveling along a dusty road in Kansas. A 
high hedge on either side of the road made the 
heat almost intolerable. His horses were 
sweating although they had traveled slowly all 
afternoon. Cattle lay in the shade of a few 
spindling trees. Far and wide stretched the al- 
most level landscape. No hills or mountains 
marred its level space. But few habitations 
were in sight. Some were frame buildings, 
some sod, while some were "dugouts." Save 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



471 



these and plowed fields, no sign of civilization 
was in si slit. He was an agent for hooks, and 
was visiting the "sehoolmarms" in the neigh- 
borhood. As he drove along, a school house 
became visible through the trees which sur- 
rounded it He drove up, tied his team, and 
walked toward the sehoolhouse, the door of 
which was partially closed. 

As he drew nearer he heard a voice say: 
"Bob Lynn, sit down!" The command was 
given in a clear, yet severe, tone. Then came 
the command again. The hoy evidently would 
not obey. The agent, knowing how emharrassed 
the teacher would he should he rap and wish- 
ing to see the "fun," as the hoys call it, stepped 
behind a tree where he could see all that oc- 
curred within, himself unseen. 

The schoolroom was small. There were 
about thirty pupils, all laughing. And all hut 
one, a large, rough-looking lad, probably the 
one addressed as "Bob Lynn," were seated. 
He held in his hand a slate which he was show- 
ing to another boy on the other sido of the 
room. Mischief and rebellion were certainly 
on foot. The six large boys kept their eyes on 
the teacher while they carried on their play. 
No mistaking that evil look in their eyes. 

"Give me that slate, Boh," came the stern 
command from the teacher. Every hoy straight- 
ened; their eyes shot fire; instinctively they 
put their hands in their desks. What sort of 
conflict is about to take place? A conflict be- 
tween the teacher, a mere girl, and six large, 
rough hoys. They are certainly going to keep 
good their threat that they would run "any 
and every teacher of that school, out." They 
had succeeded in causing three teachers to re 
sign during the winter and perhaps they 
thought it would be an easy matter to put this 
girl out. 

The teacher started toward Bob with ruler in 
hand. Instantly six boys were standing in the 
back of the room each armed with club or 
knife. She commanded them to sit down, but 
they only sneered at her and told bar she might 
as well go back East where she came from. 
Without saying another word she quickly 
stepped to her desk, drew out two revolvers, 
and again commanded the boys to be seated. 

No more sneers or words. The boys, with 
white faces, ran a race to see who could get 
down the quickest. With quiet voice and 
gentle words the girl lectured the hoys on their 
conduct, then gathered up their implements of 
war. 

After this was done the school work was 
taken up as if nothing had happened. What 
cool courage and firmness had been displayed! 
How skillfully she had prepared for them and 



carried out her plans without the least suspicion 
on the part of the boys! 

It was time for dismissal. The agent stole 
quickly hack to his buggy feeling very much 
like a thief. He was in the act of tying his 
team, so the pupils, at least, thought as they 
passed by. They were curious to know all 
about him, yet more eager to discuss the affair 
of the afternoon. 

When they had disappeared down the road 
he walked quickly to the school house, stepped 
inside, and beheld the girl sitting at her desk, 
her head on her arm, sobbing as though her 
heart would break. She did not hear his foot- 
steps as he stepped toward her, 

"Ruth." 

She sat up, frightened and bewildered. 

"James," she exclaimed. 

"Yes, Ruth, it is I. When you left I got 
work that would bring me out here where I 
might see you once in awhile. I witnessed all 
that took place here this afternoon and T can- 
not allow you to stay here where your life is in 
danger. Come with me, dear. Won't you? 
We will go back to the old home again." 

In vain she protested. He would not listen 
to her different excuses, and at last won her 
consent. 

They talked until twilight, then drove away 
to her hoarding place. 

If the boys did not succeed in frightening 
their teacher that afternoon they succeeded in 
"getting rid" of her in a way that had better 
and happier results. 3. B- I*. 'W. 



Victory No. It. 

A good crowd saw our baseball team win its 
fourth shut-out game for this season from the 
Friends Saturday. Hayes pitched his first 
game for the College. He made good, allow- 
ing no hits by the twenty -eight men who faced 
him. The Friends went out in the one, two, three 
order, except in the seventh, when one got to 
first on an error by Cunningham and stole 
second. This was as far as the Quakers seemed 
able to travel. Mallon started things off for 
the College by a two-bagger, and Al. Strong 
went to first on an error. Then a hit by Cave 
and an error by Rich scored Mallon and Al. 
Strong. 

A fast double in the fourth, followed by 
another in the fifth, took the remaining ginger 
out of the Friends. In the fifth Haynes had 
the misfortune to get spiked and had to retire 
from the game. Mallon went to first and 
showed that he can he counted on to play any 
place on the team. Kahl took Mallon' s place 
at third and played his usual game. 

In our half of the fifth, Hayes started things 



472 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



by drawing t pass from Davis and was sacri- 
ficed to second by Herb. Strong 1 , Then a hit 
by Kahl, two stolen bases, and three errors 
netted four runs. In the sixth, Sol. made first 
on a hit, stole second, and scored on a hit by 
Mallon. The last score was secured in the 
eighth. Porter found Davis for two bases and 
scored on sacrifice hits by Sol. and Hayes. 
The score: 

FBIBNm. AB B H SH PO A E 

Woodarti. ss 3 1 1 

V. Davis, p 3 6 

H.Davis, .'lb 3 10 3 

Rich. 2b 3 4 2 2 

Henlev. It) 3 12 1 

Welsh, rr 3 

Aiton.lf 3 2 

Ralston, cf 3 

Ontland. c 3 . r i 3 

Totals 27 24 1". R 

K. S. A.C. AB R'HSHPO A I 

H. Strong. If 4 1 

Million. 3b. lb t 2 2 7 

Al. Stronjr. ef 4 2 

Cave, ID 4 o l o 8 4 o 

Miller, c. 4 10 6 

Havnes. lb 2 5 

Kahl, Sb 2 2 110 

Porter, rf 4 1 10 2 

Cunningham. 68 3 1 11 13 1 

Hayes, p 2 1110 11 

Totals 33 f 8 3 27 12 2 

Summary — Two-base hits: Mallon, Porter; 
double plays: Cunningham to Cave to Haynes, 
Cave to Cunningham to Mallon; bases on balls: 
off Hayes 1, off Davis 1; struck out: by Hayes 
d, by Davis 2. Umpire, Quigley. 



K. & A. C. Witts Track Meet. 

In the first annual track and field meet of the 
Kansas Intercollegiate Athletic Association, 
K. S. A. C. showed that baseball was not her 
only hobby by carefully tucking the honors of 
first place under her jacket and getting safely 
back home with the pie. The College men 
entered every event, and in only one did they 
fail to figure in the head marks, while in one- 
third of the events they come in for two shares. 

The pole vault was captured for the College 
by Oskins and Watkins, who quit when they 
found the pole too short to accommodate them 
any longer. With the exception of this event, 
the runs were the features. In the 100-yard 
shuffle Cain, after being penalized one yard for 
starting too promptly, was the first card out. 
His time, however, does not equal that which 
he made in the Baker meet. Milligan received' 
two first places. His mile was run with him in 
the lead from the start. One of the prettiest 
runs of the day was the relay. Jones touched 
his man first, and the College stayed in the 
lead to the end, Edelblute making his quarter 
in less time than any of the other fifteen men. 
Cain and Milligan were the other members of 
the team. 

For the other colleges Marple and Bigger 



of the College of Emporia, did the best work, 
each winning two firsts. McMillin, of Cooper, 
made a good throw with the hammer, but shows 
lack of form. He has considerable to learn 
from Honska along that line. 

The management handled the affair as well 
as could be expected under the prevailing con- 
ditions. An effectual means to prevent such 
liberal trespassing should have been'provided. 
The broad jumpers and pole vaulters could eas- 
ily have had the wind at their barks if previous 
notice had been given to the arrangement. The 
hurdles were very poor and varied as much as 
two inches in height. More timers should have 
been provided, which would allow the records 
to be recognized by the athletic union. Con- 
sidering this to be the first meet under the new 
constitution, liberal allowance is made for all 
deficiencies. 

In the totals. K. S. A. C. had 56 points; 
College of Emporia, 39}; State Normal, 24: 
Washburn, 18 J; Fairmount, 15; Cooper, 7; 
St. Marys, 5. Fifty- five points were necessary 
to win the meet. 

When the donkey first saw the zebra 
He betran to switch his tail. 
"Well I never:" was his comment. 
"Here's a mule that's been in jail." 



Webster doings. 

The Webster measure of duration indicated 
the hour of eight as "Prexy'' Conner granted 
the recording secretary permission to call for 
the "heres." 

After M. R. Shuler had attended to our spir- 
itual welfare, A. O. Nash introduced Miss Nic- 
olet, who favored the society with a selection 
which convinced us that the old box in the cor- 
ner still contained music. We next called on 
Banty Williams for things that he had seen, 
heard, done, and experienced. He informed 
us that he really had seen, heard and experi- 
enced, but when it came to things done, some 
one else had always done the "dunning." De- 
baters, well, I guess we have them. The way 
they handled "Municipal w. Individual owner- 
ship" was far from slow. They covered all the 
ground from England to Australia by way of 
Arkansas. Here the serenaders, the "Smith 
trio," tickled, amused and entertained us until 
Mr. Englehart was called on for his melody, in 
which he gave us several versions of "Mary 
Had a Little Lamb." Percy Roberts, intro- 
duced by M. R. Shuler, said that we might 
love him if we only knew he cared. Arthur 
Kiene evidently thought so too, considering the 
theme of his stump speech. 

The usual business involved us and our 
thoughts until the lights winked, and then we 
"skedaddled" out of the hall and "scooted." 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



473 



Inter -Class Champions. 




H. Larson. 
Rose. 



Mill] gun. 



E. Larson. 
Klttell (Capt.). 



474 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Rot) m E. Berkely. 'JO. 

The crack tennis player of K. S. A. C, Mr. 
Berkely , has won first place in the tournament 
for singles and is now entered, withC. H. Carr, 
'Oft, in the tournament for doubles. We pre- 
dict an easy victory for this team. 



We Would Like to Know. 

Just how W ilber and Jeffs are related. 

Why everybody likes to pick on Gaston. 

If there is any hope for "Swud" Lawson. 

Just what the juniors are going to do next. 

What reason Carr has to think he is the 
"whole show." 

What Janitor Lawis' record is on short dis- 
tance sprints. 

If Coxen is a natural-born grafter or whether 
he acquired it. 

What Umpire Quigley will call himself at the 
next baseball game. 

What is the matter with Dan Walters since 
he dropped Zoe-ology. 



Of several new excuses that will "go" with 
the professors for bumming class. 

If Uncle Sam would really care very much if 
military drill were abolished here. 

Just how far the Faculty can see down the 
seniors' throats when they yell in chapel. 

If some one won't make a fool of himself 
when the excursion comes here next week. 

Whether the alcoves in the Library were 
built for the purpose for which they are used. 

Why Rose is so faithful in his attendance at 
the Baptist church when he is not a member 
there. 

If the sophomores are going to appreciate 
all the free advertising they are getting in this 
number. 

Just how it is possible to win "honors" and 
"glory" through dishonesty and falsehood. 
Nuff sed. 

If some means cannot be devised whereby 
every one is made to stand up during singing 
in chapel. 

If there is any truth in the report that the 
sophomo es are going to call their class book 
the '08 Proclamation. 

If it is really true that the Regents are con- 
sidering the advisability of discontinuing this 
school after Gaston graduates. 

Why the sophomores did not mention the 
number of points they made in the cross- 
country runs and the interclass track meet. 

If there is any way to catch the miscreants 
who persist In taking clippings from the papers 
and magazines in the Library before any one 
else has a chance to read them. 

What there is interesting in the Ladies Home 
Journal for the boys. Some of the girls are 
complaining that they have to wait two or 
three days after it is placed in the Library 
before they have a chance to read it. The 
boys always get there first. 



Alpha Beta Notes. 

What's the matter with the Alpha Beta 
Society? 

"Nothing at all; they are all right." 

Why did they not have a program last Sat- 
urday? 

"They went to the ball game." 

Why should they neglect society for the 
game? 

"They thought K. S. A. C. needed their 
support. ' ' 

What did they do while at the game? 

"They sounded their gentle voices." 

Will they have a program next Saturday? 

"Probably they will have two." e. a. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



475 



Ora, pro-bosctsl or the nose that had pop enow. 

I know no nose 
Like young Popenoe's: 
He must have made a face 
And It froze. 

No, there's one more nose,— 
Every wind that "Mows" 
Knows Papa Popenoe's 
Poppy nose. 



Hamps, 

Society was called to order by President 
Davis. After roll-call we were led in devotion 
by F. L. Williams. Then we heard music by 
H. E. Porter, assisted by Miss Billiard, which 
was well appreciated. We were then reminded 
of older times by a spelling match, conducted 
by R. R, Williams. The sides were chosen by 
Montgomery and Ryan; the words consisted of 
some found in the dictionary and others some 
distance away. W. B. McCampbell introduced 
Miss Hallie Smith, who favored us with a pi- 
ano solo. The serenaders, Smiths' trio, ren- 
dered some very nice music. This was a new 
feature in society this year — having music ren- 
dered in the form of a serenade. 

After recess we took up the business part of 
the program, in which "Papa" Whipple was 
called upon to relate his experience with May- 
basketers at the "hen's nest. 



ti 



'Papa" ex- 
plained in a very unique manner, but of course 
He let us draw on our own imagination as to 
just what happened after he was caught. 
Messrs. E. S. Taft and Bonebrake were 
initiated, then adjournment. J. M. R. 



Try This on Your Piano. 

(Air— "There was man.") 

There is a f reshie in this crowd, 

His face is like a map 
All colored up with pink and brown 

And '09 on his cap, 
But when a sopble nets that cap 

He hollers Roleo Rlne 
And down the cinder path they sprint, 

Both making record time. 

Our sophomores, as you all know. 

Are always making eyes. 
Their childish ways and cunning looks. 

And Alice blue neckties, 
Their proclamation was a sting. 

And represented well, 
The kind of members in that class 

That did their story teU. 

The junior boys, who think they're wise. 

Are flunking out in tests, 
But tried to show prosperity 

By wearing cheese-cloth vests. 
They put their colors on a dog. 

As if they didn't care . 
How many dogs do go to Coll, 

And do these colors wear. 

Each senior goes to bed at night 

And wears a ye Dow shirt. 
They keep their coats all buttoned tight 

To cover up the dirt. 
Me thinks I smell some burning rags. 

Although I do not know. 
The seniors must have burnt those shirts 

Because they wouldn't show. 

Written for the Glee Club by P. R. M., *09. 




"Leave nothing to what is called *luck' and 
you will generally be what is called 'lucky.' " 



W. G. Mllligan, '09. 

One of the greatest athletes in the State to- 
day. His record in track work has been a 
series of brilliant victories. He has won every 
event thus far in which he was entered. In the 
series of cross-country runs, the interclass 
track meet, the Baker meet and in the State 
meet he has won every event he entered. He is 
credited with two firsts each in the Baker meet 
and the State meet, these being in the 440-yd. 
dash and the mile run. At Topeka he lowered 
the State record in both these events, as well 
as helping to lower the record in the mile 
relay. He has now earned the required num- 
ber of points to insure a monogram. 

Knock, 

It seems surprising that any professor should 
be careless enough to keep a book out of the 
Library for more than three months at a time. 
Some of them do it, however, with many of the 
newer books. Some of the Ag. students would 
be glad to find in the book stacks some up-to- 
date references along their line of work. 




476 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



The Students* Herald 

SPECIAL FRESHMAN NUMBER. 



Kansas State Agricultural College. 



Eatered at the post-office at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, Ave cents. 



FRESHMAN STAFF. 

A.U. Kittell. Editor-iiwJhief 

(1HACH E. Lbuzleb Literary Editor 

W. (iJ. Milligan i/ocal Editor 

(). H. Thomas Exchange Editor 

' h^h XhSJk " N BB \ Associate LOOS) Edi tors 

Klizahkth Sweet Alumni Editor 

J. F. O'OONNBB Reporter 



All orders Tor subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noun of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. . 

Elizabeth Swbet. 'M. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



MANHATTAN, KAN., MAY 31, 190C 


> 


• 




JX EDITORIALS 


a; 





The club of aquatic sports Is being resus- 
citated. 



We would suggest to those students who take 
a delight in throwing chalk from the upper win- 
dows of the main building at persons passing 
tielow, that they fill their pockets with rocks, 
and use them instead. Rocks would be more 
effective and would cost the State less. 



There is a tendency on the part of some stu- 
dents at this institution to have a little fun at 
the expense of visitors to the college. This may 
and may not be alright. Certain it is that it 
may easily be carried too far. Some weeks ago 
a party of Junction City High School students 
visited the College. In our opinion the treat- 
ment given them by certain upper-classmen 
could well have been improved upon. In all 
probability there will be a large excursion here 
next week, when it would be well for us to re- 
member not to repeat some of last year's per- 
formances. Let us treat the visitors as we 
would like to be treated. 



All credit for the excursion last Monday and 
the way in which it was conducted is due to 
the Rooters' Club. To get up an excursion of 
five hundred, so near the end of the school 
year, when time and money is precious, means 
work, strenuous work. Besides this, enough 
money was raised among students and Faculty 
to pay the expenses of the band, numbering 
thirty pieces. But all this work has been well 
worth while; K, S, A. C. was advertised as 
it could have been in no other way. 



The fact that first- team men were barred from 
taking part in the interclass games of football 
and basket-ball during this school year was 
commended by every one, and it was hoped a 
precedent had been established for all future 
games. In our opinion this is exactly paral- 
lel to barring professionals from the college 
teams. The games would he more interesting 
and each class would have an equal chance. 
It would give the amateur a chance to come 
out into the limelight for the time being and 
cause more men to come out to practice and 
show what they can do. The only reason we 
can see why two of the classes prefer to play 
first-team men is that, because of a lack of 
hard work and practice, they have no confi- 
dence in their teams and want first- team men 
to help them out. 



4 Tragedy. 

A red-hot sophie came down stairs 

To wipe this print-shop out; 
"I'll clean that freshmen staff, " he cried, 
"And put them all to rout," 

Hut "Kit" Just gave him one sharp glance 

That made this sophie quiver. 

Then "Peggy" grubbed the office towel 

And stabbed him through the liver. 

We Would Like to Know. 

Why Captain Shaffer takes dairy lab. on 
Sunday. 

How some Harnps. got a passing grade in 
spelling. 

If Topeka ever boasts of the paving on her 
main street. 

If girls enjoy hanging May-baskets unless 
they get caught. 

Just what a "Scandihoovian" is, and why 
they call Jorgenson one. 

How long its going to take some people to 
find out Stauffer is on the track team. 

If a certain junior girl realizes that "Ikey" 
Miller can catch objects other than baseballs, 
and that he can steal things other than bases. 

If old William Penn and Benjamin Franklin 
didn't expect greater things of their descend- 
ants than to have them play on the Friends' 
baseball team. 



.»>• 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



477 




Hats off to K. S. A. C's, track team. 

This issue is the ''little ones'" number. 

King's Kandy Kitchen, June 4, Y. W. C. A. 

Invitations for Commencement week are out. 

D. H. Clark does first-class typewriting at 
reasonable rates. 

Mr. Verne Barber enjoyed a visit from his 
mother this week. 

Professor Potter told his hydraulics class all 
about water wheels last Friday morning. 

Everybody come to King's Kandy Kitchen 
for your ice-cream and cold drinks June 4. 

The Y. W. girls will serve ice-cream and 
cold drinks at King's Kandy Kitchen, June 4. 

John Calvin will pursue graduate studies at 
the College in the fall. Chemistry Is his line. 

Mr. Frank Turner, of Clifton, Kan., visited 
with his sister, Miss Bess, a few days last 
week. 

Miss Jessie McKenzIe, of Solomon City, is 
visiting with her sister, Mabel McKenzie, this 
week. 

Dr. H. G. Maxwell will go to Tuskegee 
Institute as an instructor in dairying and chem- 
istry next year. 

Beautiful assortment of K. S. A. C. sou- 
venirs at Askren's. Just what you want for 
graduation gifts. 

Chauncey Weaver said that we might men- 
tion his name if we thought that it would im- 
prove the issue. 

Beautiful assortment of K. S. A. C. sou- 
venirs at Askren's. Just what you want for 
graduation gifts. 

For graduation gifts go to Askren's jewelry 
store, where you find the large assortment and 
the new, up-to-date goods. 

For graduation gifts go to Askren's jewelry 
store, where you find the large assortment and 
the new, up-to-date goods. 

It is rumored that there will be work in the 
shops this summer for eight or ten men and 
that students will be given the places. 

Beginning Friday, the senior electricals will 
give a series of discussions on modern power 
stations. This will take the place of their 
regular classwork in power transmission. 

Word has been received from Fort Collins, 
Colo., that Carl Kipp was suddenly taken ill 
and has had an operation for appendicitis per- 
formed. At last reports he was improving. 



Go to D. H. Clark, Parkview Hospital, for 
typewriting. 

Wilbur McCampbell went to McFarland 
Sunday to visit friends. 

Ask Bottomly if he thinks the cistern is a 
safe retreat from May-basketers, 

The seniors had their annual luncheon last 
Saturday "under the pines." The D. S. girls 
served the meal. 

President and Mrs. Nichols will give their 
annual reception to the seniors, Friday eve- 
ning, at East Parkgate. 

The Chemical Department is busily engaged 
in testing milk samples for adulteration and 
the use of preservatives. 

The "children" all went with "Papa" and his 
excursion, leaving their paper in the hands of 
a senior and a sophomore. 

Most of the seniors were too busy to take in 
the excursion Monday. Theses and gradua- 
tion were occupying their time. 

The campus is badly in need of a shave. We 
suppose it will be treated to one *oon and we 
would suggest a shampoo, also. 

Joe Montgomery says that there wasn't one 
of the girls who came up on the excursion from 
Ottawa who would score more than 65. 

Now that strawberries are in evidence again 
we are anxiously waiting for Professor 
Dickens' announcement of strawberry day. 

R. A. Cassell is now located in Las Vegas, 
N. M. He expects soon to leave for Shawnee, 
ok la., where he will be for a month or two. 

Professor Hamilton and Assistant Anderson 
showed the junior electrical engineers through 
the Topeka Edison Co's. power-plant Monday. 

Twelve of the senior electricals have already 
secured good positions, and most of the others 
are considering offers from various electrical 
companies. 

The senior electrical engineers had their last 
laboratory Monday morning. Everything is 
lovely, and the geese are flying high among the 
electricals. 

L. B. Bender, '04, passed through Manhat- 
tan on his way to Chicago one day last week. 
He is employed by the Western Electric Co., 
but has been on the sick list for the last few 
weeks. 

Some funny things we saw in Topeka were: 
"General" Hughes, one Washburn rooter, 
"Puzzle" Jones giving Quigley the glad hand, 
and a drunk red-headed drug clerk rooting for 

K. N. A. \ . 

The sudden death of Ed. Finley cast a gloom 
over this vicinity, and the long procession 
which followed the remains to the cemetery 
Sunday showed the esteem in which he was 
held.— l%e Conctwdta Empire. 

The '06 Banner will be ready for the public 
within a week. Students should not delay se- 
curing their copies. The book is bound In 
cloth, is printed in two colors, and covers 
every phase of student endeavor. 



478 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Larmor says he is getting- better. 

Milo Hastings was at Topeka Monday. 

Captain Shaffer is making up lost time. 

Track meet: K. S. A. C. vs. K. IT., June 2. 

Off again, gone again, won again, Milligan. 

Pete Houser was stung last Friday evening. 

The "Hub" had their picture taken recently. 

D^H. Clark will do good typewriting cheaply. 

The annual competitive drill will be held 
June 5. 

So far no "josh" on Tommy White has been 
turned in. 

D. K. Morris enjoyed a visit from his father 
last week. 

Some of this year's juniors intend to graduate 
next year. 

Be sure and see the track meet with K. U. 
Saturday. 

In Topeka they have the autos. trained to 
stand without hitching. 

Professor McFarland will carry water for the 
Faculty baseball team. 

Mr. Grabendike wishes us to announce that he 
is endeavoring to raise a mustache. 

Miss Zola Walton, of the freshman class, 
has returned to her home in Geneseo. 

Miss Alice Ward, of Minneapolis, Kan., 
visited with her sister and friends last week. 

A new milking machine, run by a gasoline 
engine, is being installed at the dairy barns 
this week. 

The Y. W. C. A. gave their annual May 
morning breakfast in the D. S. building last 
Thursday. 

Miss Fern Norris, who has been visiting Miss 
Zola Walton, returned last week to her home 
in Geneseo. 

Any class desiring to display their wares on 
the corner of Moro street and Manhattan av- 
enue, see the '08s. 

The Hort. Department has set out several 
flower beds, which add greatly to the appear- 
ance of the campus. 

The junior mechanical engineers took a trip 
to Kansas City, Monday. They will spend a 
few days sightseeing. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Simpson, of McPherson, 
Kan., visited with their daughter, Mrs. Pro- 
fessor Price, last week. 

Mr. J. L. Yost, of Chester, Nebr., spent a 
few days with his son, who is employed in the 
Mechanical Department. 

J. M. Cook, who attended the dairy short 
course last winter, has a good position with a 
milk company at Omaha. 

"Nothing doing at the Hort." said Mike to 
our representative, "except that the squad is 
loafing on me." Holloway was standing 
around with his hands in. his pockets. 



A large number of ex-K. S. A. C.-ites were 
out at Topeka Monday to help whoop things 
up for their Alma Mater. 

| Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Bonebrake, of Stockton, 
came in last week to spend a few days with 
their son, C. C. Bonebrake. 
i ■ . 

It would be well for a certain student in one 
of the Rhetoric II classes to take an inter- 
mittent alarm clock to class. 

About one hundred members of the Omaha 
Commercial Club, accompanied by a band, 
spent one evening last week in town. 

The Mechanical Department has replaced the 
front trucks on one of its traction engines with 
a steel roller, which will be used on the roads. 

One of the traction engine classes steered the 
big "Advance" into a ditch one afternoon last 
week. It took a half day's work to get her 
out. 

Pro fessors Melick, Hamilton and Kammeyer 
each gave a boost to the Topeka excursion, by 
means of stump speeches, at Thursday morn- 
ing chapel. 

Messrs. Brown, Grabendyke, Bixby and Mc- 
Campbell went to Wamego, Tuesday evening 
of last week, where they furnished the music 
for "The Clansman." 

Dr. L. V. Kllbrecht, of Copenhagen, dairy 
councilor for Denmark, is inspecting the dairy 
department. Professor Erf visited Doctor 
Ellhrecht at Copenhagen some years ago. 

E. C. Farrar left last Saturday for his home 
in Beattie, Kan. He had been ill for over a 
week and will spend a few days in rest and re- 
cuperation. We hope to see him back soon. 

A. C. Ferris and E. M. Wilson will go to 
Chicago about July 1 to take positions with 
the Western Klectric Co. W. I. Coldwell and 
H. R. Heim expect to go to Pittsburg, Pa., 
with the Westinghouse Electric Co. 

Assistants Wood and Watkins will divide 
the vacation between them, the former going to 
his home in Sturgis, Mich., tor the first part 
of the summer, and the latter to his home in 
Grundy Center, Iowa, during the last. 

A new roller has been placed under the front 
of the engine used for pressing down the oiled 
road, and now both front and hack wheels mash 
the clods. More oil is expected soon so that 
the road may be treated to another coat. 

A delegation of about sixty pupils and 
teachers from the county schools of Franklin 
county, in charge of the county superinten- 
dent, Baker, were around College last Thurs- 
day. President Nichols, Institute Secretary 
Miller and Professor McKeever showed them 
around. 

The experiments in the electrical laboratory 
with the gas engine electric generator have been 
very satisfactory. A result of the tests will be 
printed in circular form for distribution. The 
tests were concerned with the use of electricity 
on the farm for light and power and should be 
of interest to all farmers. The outfits used in 
the experiments were furnished by the Fair- 
banks-Morse Co. 



THE STUDENTS' HEftALD. 



479 



i 



SNAPPY SUITS 



FROM THE WORLD'S 
BEST MAKERS A; a: 



FOOTWEAR 
Latest 

Fads 



Step in for a moment and be convinced that our 

store is the place to get the earliest points on 

— JUST WHAT TO WEAR 



JOHN COONS, of Course 



Hot 
Weather 
SHIRTS 



• 

i 



A number of the boys caught Mr. Lewis near 
Harrison's store one evening last week and 
threatened to show him that he wasn't on the 
canipus. He surrendered very graciously, 
however, and even treated the boys to a soda 
apiece for letting him go. 

It's the talk of the day; Vesuvius and Ran 
Fancisco are forgotten; we don't care anything 
about the Standard Oil investigation or poli- 
tics; but listen here!- There is a' girl in this 
institution who has been here a year and says 
she don't know who Gaston is I . 

Archie Moore is engaged in taking an inven- 
tory of the chemical apparatus and stock in 
Physical Science Hall. The inventory will be 
listed on cards in card catalogue form. Spaces 
are arranged on each card to carry it through 
the year 1913, when the catalogue will be re- 
newed. 

A mania for stealing flowers seems to be 
going the rounds these days. May-hasketing 
is very interesting, but it should not be an 
excuse for vandalism. Ornamental flowers in 
yards are not alone to feed the pride of the 
owner, but to delight the passerby, and no per- 
son should be so selfish as to ruthlessly destroy 
a flower. effect meant for the eyes of the public. 



Wilma (Cross) Rhodes, '04, and Howard N. 
Rhodes, '06, agent in the U. P. depot of Man- 
hattan, left last week for Battle Creek, Mich., 
where Mrs. Rhodes will remain for the benefit 
of the baby's health. 

C. J. Axtell, '04, writes from 174 S. Common 
street, Lynn, Mass., where he has been with 
the General Electric Co. for about a year. He 
is now in the special testing department where 
they do testing on new and special designs. 



Alumni and Former Students. 

Delia (Drolinger) Glunt, '02,. left recently for 
Washington and Oregon to visit relatives. 

Nellie Paulsen and L. B. Pickett, both of the 
class of '05, will be married at Whiting, Kan., 
Saturday, at 2:00 P. M. 

Bessie Hudson, of College Hill, student in 
'03, is employed as governess at the Odd Pel- 
lows' Home, Eureka Lake. 

A. .T. Axtell, '04, is engaged in special test- 
ings of new designs gotten out by the General 
Electric engineers at Linn, Mass, 

Edith Davis, '05, and her mother expect to 
leave soon for points in England and Wales, 
where they will spend the summer. 

Will Harold, '05, has been elected superin- 
tendent of the Wamego electric lighting plant. 
He began his work Monday morning. 

Katherine Winter, '01, is filling the place of 
cashier in Wharton's dry-goods store. The 
place was made vacant by the resignation of 
Emilie Pfuetze. ? 98. 



K. S. A. C. 4, Washburn 0. 

The above score tells the story of yester- 
day's game. Washburn was easily outclassed, 
both in fielding and batting, and never had a 
ghost of a show at scoring. Batteries: Wash- 
burn, Riegel and Robb; K. S. A. C. , Mallon 
and Miller. 



Just So 



The fellow who wants 
things "Just so" wants to see 

The 

"SUFFOLK" 
SACK 
SUIT 

"Put up" for the particu- 
lar! Style kinks that are 
welcome sights to the man 
of taste. 

Men's perfect-Hit inn union 
suits, SI to $2.50. 

Men's new sailors. $1 to %4. 

New soft shirts. 75c to $2. 

When are you 
coming In? 




Copyright 1906 

B. Kuppenhelmer & Co. 
Chicago 



E. L. Knostman 



'''" 



480 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



New and 2^S~ 
School Book* 



Spectacles 
Gold Pens 



R. ELOFINCK | 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, Notions and 
Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



Exchanges. 

Andrew Carnegie is becoming popular with 
the smaller colleges of Kansas through his 
generous gifts. 

Oregon has a University Day when books 
and classes are forgotten and the day is spent 
in the improvement of the campus. They 
should have a Hort. squad. 

A new scheme for raising money for the San 
Francisco sufferers has come to the surface. 
Several Delaware girls, because of their great 
sympathy for those unfortunate people, are 
selling kisses at one dollar per. One rosy- 
lipped maiden m r de one hundred dollars in 
two hours, and then said she wasn't tired a bit. 

A. S. A. C. Directory. 

HAMILTON ROCIETY. 

President C. E, Davis 

Vice-president A. D. Holloway 

Secretary , ,...C. G. Nevins 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in north society 
bait. 

WEBSTER SOCIETY. 

President W. A. Conner 

Vice-president P. W. Caldwell 

Secretary ....J. E Brock 

Meets Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock In south society 
hall. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY. 

President ...E. W. Matherly 

Vice-president Anna Tolin 

Secretary Walter Zahnly 

Meets in south society hall at 3:00 p. m. 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY. 

President../; EL. Shattuck 

Vice-president Almira Kerr 

Secretary Walter Taylor 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 7:30 P. M . 

IONIAN SOCIETY. 

President Alma McRae 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Blanche Robertson 

Meets in north society hall Saturday at 2:45 p. m. 

EURODELPHIAN SOCIETY. 

President Gabriella Venard 

Vice-president Marie Coons 

Secretary ..Adah Lewis 

Meets in Franklin Hall Saturday at 3:45 F. m. 

ENGINEERS' ASSOCIATION. 

President J. L. Dow 

Vice-president Smith Paris 

Secretary W. W. Carlson 

Meets Saturday evening in C 60 at 7:30. 

AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION. 

President W. A.Conner 

Vice-president W. E. Watkins 

Secretary W. B. Gernert 

Meets Saturday at 3:80 in Ag. Hall. 

GIRLS' ROOTERS' CLUB. 

President Boline Hanson 

Vice-president Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Grace Hawkins 

Leader.. ...Catherine Ward 

BOYS' ROOTERS' CLUB. 

Chairman A. D. Holloway 

Vice-chairman j, r. coxen 

Secretary B. H. Wilber 

Treasurer j. E. Brock 

Meets at the call of the chairman. 



y. n. c. A. 

President .- A. D. Holloway 

Vice-president C. E. Whipple 

Secretary R. W. Hull 

General Secretary W. W. McLean 

Prayer-meeting, Thursday evening. 6:45. 

Y. w. c. A. 

President Flora Hull 

Vice-president. Margaret Cunningham 

Secretary Ella V. Brooks 

General Secretary Miss Thayer 

Weekly meeting during noon hour each Saturday in 
south society hall. The Home, 617 Manhattan Ave. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

President E. L. Adams 

Vice-president A. D. Hollo wav 

Secretary C. E. Whipple 

General Manager Prof. G. A. Dean 

Meets at call of the president. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 



• • 



Porcelain b*th tubs flat llnctlgarsand toilet articles 




THE 



HERALD 

GIVES 



Spicy and Complete "write-ups" of 
all the baseball games. 

If you really want to keep up on 
athletic events It will pay you to 
subscribe. DO IT NOW! 



$1 PER YEAR 











"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan C^ndy Kitchen. 



Wemake ail oui own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 

Pan Candies and Bert 
Cream Candies :: :: 



Phone 167 




AH 



<* 



WeSdl 

THE BEST 



Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Pikes Right 



■% ^ *^^^^ ^^ ^^ff^*^^^i ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^i^^ ^ *^^*tf^*i^^^^i^^^^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^A^^W^^J»J^^^^^^ ^ ^*^^^\* * #jrf^^^^MMVMV S JMVVM^ 



Fountain: 



Everything Up-toDate in the Drink 

KE CREAM SODAS — 



Finest 







Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



rat go on another hx 
your separator NOW, 
of all farm in 



UJ Kyo O h. TC caw,«HJdo B 0t OW ..C« 1 rf gd 
J* Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. *J If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until Jspring. 1 Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
Q Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
particularly while butter! values are highest 4J Buy 
and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 



The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 
Baadoipfc and Canal Sta 

PHILADELPHIA 

lSISHRiert Street 

BAN FRANCISCO 
fraad 11 Drtnmn Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlaadt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

Zltl Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and TTjYork Street 

WINNIPEG 

EstfMeDermet Avenue 







71 



ft 



THE OLD RELIABLE" 



.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



JLL 



Phone 167 




-AH Kinds of 



We Sell 

THE BEST 
ww 



Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 





F u uLtiiitim Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
OUIllain. ICE CREAM SODAS 



11 



I 



I 



J 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



« 



K you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. ^ If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until [spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
<J Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter! values are highest fl Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drumm Street, 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

^Jl YouvUle Square 

TORONTO 

and TEYork Street 

WINNIPEG 
ggtiTMcDennet Avenue 







«■»< 



-I 



ur Young Men's Suits 



WE TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Clothes for the Young Man from 16 to 20 years of age. Our suits 
have the desired amount of style in cut and make-up, while the fabrics 
are the most appropriate. We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we have made ready for them. . 



• • • . 



You'll Find Our Suits Different 

They are $10.00, $12.50, $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 and $22.00. 



L 



W. S. ELLIOT 



312 

POYNTZ 

AVE. 






We Have Just Rece ived 

Another shipment of the very latest styles in BELTS, including the 
Gold and Silver and the latest fads in Leather. Our line is complete, styles 
correct, prices small. A big showing in Wash Belts, including the "Alice 
Longworth." Six attractive styles at 10 cents. 

Our stock of BAGS includes the new shapes in Leather and White 
Canvas. They are well made, with strong frames. Prices 25 cenu and up. 

The quality and extra high finish of our BACK- and SIDE-COMBS is well 
known. The line of Fancy Combs is now ready, and very attractive at 25 
cents to 96 cents. 

The 

Big Racket 





■fiChe ^Students' Herald 



V 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College 3£ <X 






SENIOR CLASS PLAY 

Auditorium, Tuesday evening, June 12 

X. TICKETS ON SALE X 





FIRST-GRADE BUTTER 



That's what brings the top price! The trade demands It. The 
creameries want to furnish It. But to do so, they must have first- 
grade cream and an increasing number of them are willing to pa; a 
premium" to get It. Much of the cream now comes from farm 
separators, and It will Increase, for the use of farm separators Is in- 
creasing. The farm separator not only makes the farmer more 
money, but it save* him money, saves him time and makes his work 
easier. The situation is plain. The creamery most have first-grade 
cream and the farmer Is bound to use the hand separator. There- 
fore the separator he uses must be capable of producing first-grade 
cream. The Improved 



U.S. CREAM 



I 

I 



SEPARATOR 

Can skim a heavier cream than any other and do It without clogging. 

The TJ, S. has the record of skimming a cream testing 65 per cent. 

And remember: The U. S, holds the World's Record for Clean Skimming. 

I Gets the Most Cream and Will Deliver as Heavy a Cream as You Want 

Our fine new catalogue both explains and shows by accurate illustrations why 
the U. S. can skim First-grade cream, how It won the World's Record and why 
without question it is the easiest cared for. longest wearing and most profitable 
cream separator built to-day. Just say, "Send Catalogue No. 173," and you'll get 
it by return mail. 

VERMONT FARM HACHINE CO. 



I 



I 



BELLOWS FALLS, 



VERTIONT 



i_ 



I 
I 

I 



J 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



FOR 

Icecream and 

Icecream sodas 



GOTO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. Disc Cultivators, Safety 
Com Harvesters, Little Wonder Churns, Perfection 
Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves, Sash Weights, Chimney Caps, 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs, Structural Iron Work, Stove Re- 
pairs, etc. :: :: :: :: :: :: :; :; :: ;; 



MANHATTAN, 



KANSAS 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage line, 
Meet all trains day or night. 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable for ball 
games, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty, :: :: :: :: :: :: 



PHONE 65 



H. J. Barnbouse 



L W. Phillips 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



481 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of clears and toilet 
articles. Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 

113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



Subscribe for 



THE HERALD 

$1 per year. 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



3J 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

KI NG'S 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Wait for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers anil (ias 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

at ENGEL BROTHERS 




WOLF'S 

STUDIO 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 

and HARD and SOFT COAL 
Phone 55 Phone 55 

ORR'S STUDIO 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Photo of any size or style. Souvenir Postal 

Cards of College and I. O. O. F. Home 

FOR SALE 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop, 

ao to 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best. X> X> 

W. M. STBMGLEY & CO, 



482 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




^teo 



DEALE 



Dry- Goods 

Fans for the girl gradu- 
ates. 

We have a nice assort- 
ment of dainty fans and 
the prices range from 50c 
to $1.50 each. 

New patterns in 

ALL-OVER 
EMBROIDERY 

for waists. 



New 
Laces. 



Val and Torchion 



Krtppendorff-Dlttmann Co's 
Ladles' Shoes 

They tire the best you can buy. 

Ladles' Gymnasium 

Slippers 

$1 and $1.35 

Baseball shoes. 

Men's All- America Shoes. 
Men's Educator Shoes. 
Men's Erica Shoes. 
Made by Rice & Hutchins. 
None Better. 
Every Pair Warranted. 



New 

Ready-to-wear goods 
for Commencement 

A complete new line of 
dainty Waists. White and 
colored shirt-waist suits. 
New designs in white woolen, 
duck and linen skirts. 

Everything in muslin un- 
derwear. 

New caps In white and 
colors. 

Pongee and taffeta silk 
coats. 

MOO ALL PATTERNS. 

10c and 15c. None higher. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladles' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Pbone 87 for Dry -Goods, Heady- to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Removal Sale 



at 



The Leader 



Our shelves are full, and we have 
a large reserve stock. We are sell- 
ing our oxfords and one lot of shoes 
at 20 per cent off, one lot of shoes 
30 per cent off, which is removing 
them from our shelves to the 
CUSTOMERS' FEET. Dry-goods 
and furnishings at lowest cash 
price. Yours to please, 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs tine line cigars and toilet articles 

PllQFE&SIONA L. 

DR, G. A. CUISE, DENTIST. 



Moore Bros. & Co. 



34 years of continuous practice should he convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DK. J. E. TAYLOtt, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office pbone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormlck, Dentist 

Room 16. Union National Bank Building 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc Students OtThe 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MottorbetEveiyCtoe Cultivate His Oum Qettias. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., June 7, 1906. 



Number 37 



Washburn Easy. 

It is Mike who loves flowers, and his aggre- 
gation spread their roses at his feet, incident- 
ally clinching their right to the State cham- 
pionship over the Congregational ists' heads. 
The two thorns Cave brought with his posey 
was what spoiled the farmers' errorless game. 
At no time did Stahl's bunch play like winners, 
and the principal interest the spectators found 
was in watching the rabbits as they tried to 
show them the art. 

Riegle handed up the teasers for Washburn, 
striking out but four men and issuing free 
transportation to two others. Among the hits 
the "farmers" extracted from his assortment 
four were each good for two sacks. Mall on, 
for the College, had fine control of the sphere 
and did not allow the visitors to even look in 
on his stock until Riegle found a crack in the 
eighth and peeked in. He issued one pass in 
the first, but after that he watched their mouths 
water with no show of dividing up. Good sup- 
port was tendered him throughout the entire 
hour and ten minutes the game lasted. 

Washburn's only chance for circling the 
bases was at the start, when White was passed 
to station 1. McCampbell knocked the sphere 
to Sol., but the College lost a chance for a 
double on Cave's error. White attached the 
third sack on a fielder's choice by Robb, but 
lost his chance to score when Maxwell handed 
the ball baek to Mallon. 

The "farmers" found a hole in the run sack 
the first thing, and Al. Strong crawled through 
with Cave at his heels before Riegle could set 
his foot over it. Cave singed the left grass 
plot with a two s acker, but annexed the third 
bag while Nipps was chasing the ball. Al. 
came in while the sphere was being relayed 
home, and Cave scored when Robb heaved the 
Spaulding over McCampbell's head. Nipps 
was replaced by Markham. 



In the second spasm Sol. started himself off 
with a little hit, pilfered the second bag and, 
finding the old hole in the sack, came in on 
Kahl's two- bagger. In the third Mallon took 
hold of the big stick and ordered two bases. 
On an attempted double Al. Strong claimed 
station 1 while Carl still held station 2. 
Haynes sent the best he had in his bat to White, 
who let it crawl over the ends of his fingers, 
and Mallon scored. After this Stahl ordered 
the run sack sewed up, and the "farmers" 
pleased him by not breaking through. 

The score: 

Washburn. ab b h sh po a ■ 

Farroer.rf 4 f [ * f ° 

White.ss 3 3 1 

McCampbell, 3b.. 4 1 

Robb c 4 ° ° 5 l 1 

MuxwenV 2b. ::.;:: 3 » 1 

Stahl cf 3 8 

Markham.lf 3 * ° f. J « g 

Rieirle I) 3 1 5 O 

Totiis.:::..::.:: » o 1 o 24 9 « 

K S A C, AB B H SH PO A ■ 

H.Stron K .lf 4 

Mallon, P i ? a » « n 

SSe^ib.:::: J S ? § l s ? S 

Sr c rfv;;:::::::::::::::::::: J ! i S I } I 

Cunningham, ss f 1 \ g *J 8 

Kahl.Sb • 3 10 2 2 

Totals 31 4 7 1 27 14 % 

Summary— Earned runs: K. S. A. C, 2; 
two-base hits: Mallon, Cave, Miller, and 
Kahl: stolen bases: Cunningham, Kahl; bases 
on balls: off Mallon 1, oft* Reigle 2. Struck 
out: by Mallon 3, by Reigle 4. Time of game, 
I hour and 3 minutes. Umpire, Quigley. 



Dual Meet. 

The dual track meet with Kansas University 
was held last Saturday in Athletic Park. The 
day was ideal and the track in good condition, 
but no State records were demolished, and as 
a whole the meet was slow. Our runners were 
not in the best of condition and made a poorer 



484 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



showing' than at the State meet. While this 
was our first meet ever held with K. U., we 
nevertheless succeeded in showing 1 the Univer- 
sity team that we are more nearly in their 
class than any school they have met this year. 
For the College, Watkins raised his record on 
the pole vault and broad jump, and Seng 
increased his distance on the hammer throw. 
Russel, of the University team, tried for a record 
of 11 feet fi inches on the pole vault, but lacked 
a little bit of being successful. 

Honors of the meet were equally divided, but 
in the scoring the J ay hawkers figured fourteen 
points to the good. Some of the events 
were decidedly one-sided, giving little room 
for the enthusiasm which is manifested in 
a more close! y contested meet. The pole 
vault, hammer throw and high jump were 
easily captured by the University, while the 
broad jump and two-mile run were as easily 
taken by the College. Probably the most 
exciting finishes were exhibited by the 100-yard 
dash, the half mile, and the relay. 

The College obtained six of the first places 
out of fifteen events. The final score stood 
72 J points for K. U. and 58. points for K. S. 
A. C. The table of winners and the records 
will be printed next week. 



Faculty Play the Seniors. 

In one of the most one-sided games of the 
season, the professors were defeated by the 
seniors at Athletic Park last Monday. The 
grade slingers could not get hits while at bat, 
reserving this feature of the game for their 
part in fielding. Prexy was on the firing line 
at the start, but retired after he had made good 
his promise to this year's finishers, of twenty- 
four scores. His aggregation failed to give 
him the necessary support, which accounts for 
the number of chalk marks. In the fourth 
inning, McKeever, who appeared more appro- 
priately in the role of Sunny Jim, went into 
the box and let the youngsters down with but 
one hit and one score. 

The professors made their only score when 
Remick crossed the pan after connecting with 
one of senior Wood's parabola*s. The equa- 
tion of his path around the sacks would be too 
complex to compute, but his return to the 
origin gave the valentine artists their only 
score. 

Dickens at centerfield played the game of his 
life. He went after the ball in a manner which 
showed that he had not guarded strawberry 
patches all this time for nothing. Kammeyer 
at short was handicapped by leaving his bucket 
at home. McCormick was a good one, but 
Valley should have been allowed to sing first 



base. Cortelyou starred at third, Remick 
covered second, and Price received the pellets. 
Eyer at the left grass plot and McKeever at the 
right one completed the line up. Brink re- 
placed Dickens for the fourth inning. 



Warning. 

If the chap with hair of sunset hue, who hails 
from Emporia, persists in his attempts to climb 
over the fence into the pheasant yard he will 
find trouble awaiting him there. This might 
apply to any others who cannot read the 
notices posted about the yard nor interpret the 
significance of a high fence and locked gates. 
The pheasants are shy and easily frightened. 
Three or four have already lost their lives by 
flying violently against the wires when dis- 
turbed by intruders. 



Webs. 

For the last time of the closing College term 
we assembled in the old hall. Our hearts were 
light, and well they might be for would we not 
in a few more days be greeting home folks? 

The program over which I will not go into 
detail was spicy and appropriate. 

After doing away with our small troubles, we 
listened to the out- going members, then sent 
Grover Kahl down to inform Jimmie Carver 
that we were anticipating our annual feast. 

The feast— well, we ate all ''Jimmie" had, 
bid each other good-by, and quietly left the 
premises. s * w - c - 

Alpha Beta Notes. 

The Alpha Betas went prospecting Saturday. 
About five o'clock they were seen wending their 
way eastward. Society colors marked the way 
leading to the picnic grounds. 

Warning to A. B's.: "Never follow the 
solitary blue. It must always be accompanied 
by yellow to stand for Alpha Beta. Blue 
alone may lead you into by-paths and danger; 
blue and yellow always guide aright." 
Thanks be to Geo. Moffit, for he stood on the 
top of the hill and blew his little horn loud 
and long, that all might find the picnic place, 
though some seem to have followed the echoes 
as they rebounded from hill to hill, for they 
appeared on the scene when supper was almost 
finished. 

As soon as the crowd had gathered on the 
summit of Prospect, Lewis drank to the health 
and prosperity of the society. He did it in all 
sobriety and solemnity. (Would you believe 
he had a stolen bird nest in his pocket at the 
time?) 

Misses Wahlgren, Esdon, and others did 
commendable work as a committee. They pro- 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



485 



vided a bountiful repast— "good stuff" and 
plenty of it. It pays to put D. S. girls on 
committees for preparing lunch. Of course, 
they served salad in the usual way — a dab on 
a leaf. After all had eaten till no fragments 
remained, games were played on the grassy 
lawn of Prospect. In a running contest, Esther 
Hungerford proved to be the best runner. 
First prize was awarded her— a real live turtle, 
an emblem of her speed. Smith exhibited a 
great deal of patience in getting the crowd 
quiet long enough to pose for a picture. 

Everybody had a glorious time. In good 
season the party started homeward. They slid 
down the north slope of Prospect and landed 
"down town." When they gained firm footing 
again, they marched off the scene to the music 
of the graphophone. E. a. 

Ionian Society. 

The Ionians gathered at one o'clock in the 
hall for its last society program tliis year, as 
the seniors will conduct it June 9. 

Society was called to order by Pres. Alma 
McRae, and devotional exercises were led by 
Helen Inskeep. The program opened with a 
vocal solo by Florence Sweet and needs no 
comment. The "Oracle," by Minnie Connor, 
was an excellent one. Charlotte Morton's sis- 
ter favored the society with a pleasinir solo, 
followed by a song in German. Stella Hawkins 
impersonated a little boy entertaining his big 
sister's beau who told everything he could 
think of and more too. An instrumental solo 
by Bessie Nicolet, accompanied on the violin 
by A; D. McCampbell, was followed by a 
question box by Blanche Groom. Mary 
Kimball rendered a pleasing instrumental 
medley. The "Oracle" of the previous week, 
edited by Esther Christensen, preceded a vocal 
solo by Edna Biddison. One of the questions 
in the box was, "Which deserves our best 
support, the track meet or society?" and the 
one answering as well as the good attendance 
was a proof that we believed the society did. 

B. M. N. 

Sophs, vs. Juniors. 

In one of the most interesting exhibitions of 
baseball ever held on the home diamond, the 
sophomores lost to the juniors by a score of 2 
to ft. The plays were unexpected, fascinating, 
doubtful, and spectacular, and the spectators' 
glims were constantly riveted on the class stars 
to see what they would do next. The sphere 
never before had such a rubber heart, and 
never before were the players so considerate 
as to pass the ball so far from the basemen in 
order to avoid all possibility of their sus- 
taining injury. Taking it all around, with 



"Swud's" batting and "Jorgey's" sprinting, 
the crowded grand stands never before saw 
such a brilliant exhibition as they viewed last 
Friday. 

The game was interesting from start to finish, 
and only the upheaval of the sophs, in the 
fourth inning saved an extra-inning game. 
Both teams played like leaguers, and both 
pitchers received about the same kind of sup- 
port. Mai Ion and Miller handled the pills for 
the juniors, and Hayes and Putnam did the 
same act for the sophs. 

The sophomores started the scoring in the 
first inning when Herb. Strong crossed the 
pan. Their other score was made in the 
seventh by Cave, on Oman's long drive to left. 

The juniors made their first score in the 
fourth spasm when Davis came in. During the 
same inning "Ikey," "Doc." Cassel, "Jorgey" 
and Nystrom each followed his example The 
sophs, caught their balloon after nine men had 
been at bat. The '07 's last run was made in 
the seventh when Mallon entered the run col- 
umn. Davis and Mallon did the best stick 
work for the juniors. 

The features were the base stealing during 
the game and the sale the Dairy Department 
had on butter before the game. 



Franklins. 

We met, as usual, at 8 o'clock with E. L. 
Shattuck in the chair. After roll-call, devo- 
tion, and reading of the minutes, we turned to 
the head of program. Mr. ZOller gave a book 
review, Miss Wenkheimer a recitation, and D, 
K. Morris conducted a question box. Then 
Matilda Trunk proved to Inez Guttridge and 
the rest of the society "That solitude is more 
favorable to mental and moral improvement 
than society." Then followed a declamation 
by Larmor, an impersonation by R. Wilson, 
and the "Spectator" by Margaret Justin. 
About this time our president received word by 
wireless telegraphy that JJrogy's "Minstrels" 
were soon to arrive, and in a few minutes they 
appeared. They gave us three selections be- 
fore we would consent to their leaving. After 
recess Mr. Morgan introduced the Misses 
Drake, who rendered an excellent piano duet. 
Then came the critic's report, a short business 
session, and adjournment. E. B. J. 

The annual gymnasium exhibition given by 
the gymnasium girls under the direction of Miss 
Barbour, held on the campus May 29, was the 
best ever given. The tennis, rose, and May 
pole drills and the May pole dance were 
especially good. About seventy girls took 
I part. A large crowd was present. 



486 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




M«rrw; IrrCvtnv 

CwiTIYATt Ml* 

Own Ocina >+» 



Entered at the post-offlce at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 

C. E. Whipple. '07 Editor-in-chief 

(JitovKii Kahl,*07.. v ....Business Manager 

May Griffing. *07 Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston. '08 Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham. '06 , .Exchange Editor 

H. R. Hii.lman. W Assoc. Business Manager 

.F. E. Brock, '08 Subscription Manager 

Grace Hawkins. '08 » Assoc Local Editors 

A. G. Phillips. W f A8S00, uooai Mll °™ 

Elizabeth Swret. *04 Alumni Editor 

O. W. Wkavrb.'OH Reporter 

All orders Tor subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
tban Monday noon of each week, 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion Is due and tbat you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to tbe business manager, 

Elizabeth Sweet, '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerningj 



i editor, will be glad 



Manhattan, KAN.,«M*rtn, 1906 


* 




a; editorials 


x, 


^^ 



It is with satisfaction that we note the peace 
and harmony in which the various classes dwell 
together this spring 1 . The Faculty, no doubt, 
notice it, too. It is, without doubt, the result 
of a common interest in athletics and the Col- 
lege welfare. May it always be so. 



The track team of K. S. A. C, has had phe- 
nomenal success this spring. When the inter- 
collegiate meet was arranged the most enthusi- 
astic of us could not hope for a victory. We 
hoped we might win second place and later 
hoped for first, but all were surprised that the 
team should win the meet so easily. Then 
when K. U. decided to come up we hoped to 
make a fair showing, but imagine our surprise 
at the success. True, K. U. won, and yet no 
one saw the meet who was not satisfied with our 
team. The defeat was due somewhat to a series 
of unfortunate accidents, though we are not 
Complaining. Considering that this year is our 
first attempt at a track team, it makes us feel 
like throwing our hats away. 



It Is only a question of a short time until 
K, S. A. C. will take every thing in the State in 
the line of athletic honors. This may look like 
a rash prophecy to some of our sister institu- 
tions, but we have the material and the spirit 
and the preceding forecast is an inevitable 
result. 

Last Saturday morning was the first time 
that special music has been given in chapel 
since the editorial regarding applause was 
published. The result waa interesting. Only 
a few students applauded and they felt out of 
place. It seemed especially inappropriate 
consider ing the nature of the solo that was 
rendered. We hope no one will so far forget 
himself the next time. 



The assessment system for maintaining 
.athletics is the modern way in colleges now 
and we hope to see it adopted in our own 
College before another year. It saves a 
deal of hard work for the students and athletic 
management, puts athletics on a sound basis 
and removes the element of lottery which 
attends the result of the season's work. 



There has been a movement started to form 
an interstate oratorical contest by the agricul- 
tural colleges of Colorado, Oklahoma, Iowa, 
Missouri, Nebraska, and Kansas. We have 
been neglecting this part of our development. 
In all the enterpriser wa have undertaken we 
have been remarkably successful. In all 
branches of athletics, in corn and stock judg- 
ing and in our intersociety oratorical contests 
we have pushed to the front, but we arj lack- 
ing in our development along debating and 
oratorical lines. Some of the societies are 
arranging for intersociety debates, which is a 
foward movement. There are plenty of students 
who will work hard to represent K. S. A. C in 
a contest in oratory or debating, and should be 
encouraged. K. S. A. C. is thought to be nar- 
row by many persons, and a movement of this 
sort will help represent us in our real broadness. 
If a few cranks would develop and work on some 
contest of this sort it would do a world of good 
for the College. 

May Morning Breakfast, 

Misses Eleanor March, Ellen Hanson, 
Blanche Robertson, Lulu Rannels and Marie 
Coons spent last Tuesday night with Mary 
Kimball at her home on College Hill. They 
served an early May morning breakfast to 
Messrs. Wilson, Smith, Cunningham, Graves, 
Adams, and Cold well. The forenoon was 
spent in fishing in the Wildcat. A picnic 
dinner was served in the woods. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



467 




Watch for the freshmen class pin designs. 

K. S. A. C. pins, fobs and charms at Askren's. 

Get your Commencement flowers from Hollo- 
way. 

See Holloway for cut flowers for Commence- 
ment. 

Richard Getty has gone home on account of 
his eyes. 

Askren, the jeweler, is the place for gradua- 
tion gifts. 

Foreman Lamb whitewashed the chicken 
house last week. 

The mechanicals made a boiler test on the 
Avery engine last week. 

Mr. Templeton, a Washburn student, visited 
W. C. Taylor last Sunday. 

George Moffltt was visited by his mother and 
sister for a few days last week. 

Coach Melick "set up" the track team to Ave 
gallons of ice-cream last Monday. 

Richardson expects to have his gasoline 
traction engine finished about July 1. 

A. D. Holloway has secured an agency from 
a Kansas City greenhouse for cut flowers. 

Miss Lulu Carl at, of Auburn, will be here 
this Saturday to stay over Commencement. 

Hastings wasn't feeling well last Monday. 
He said he didn't get a letter from his wife. 

Miss Grace Hawkins has been out of College 
for the past week on account of oak poisoning. 

Mr. 'Earle Thurston and Miss Isabel Kirk, 
of Bui'r Oak, will be here this coming Monday. 

Watches, rings, chains, charms and lockets 
at Askren's —the place where you find the new 
goods. 

A junior. D. S. girl asked if the sterilizer 
used by the Dairy Department was a washing 
machine. 

Prof. O. Erf has secured seventy-five posi- 
tions this year for students who have taken 
dairying. 

Some of the changes we want next year is a 
"high society" column and a new heading for 
the locals. 

Pictures of the freshman class pin will be 
shown on Friday. Orders can be left at the 
College post-office. 

A young man who chased a may-basketer one 
evening recently received a razor the next day 
with the advice to use it. 



The Manhattan Assessor says that he found 
4250 resident people in Manhattan and thinks 
there is enough more to make it 4500. 

When Garver wishes to punish anybody 
lately he throws dollars at them. Up to this 
time he is on good terms with the Herald. 

A couple of girls when they returned from 
the sophomore-junior ball game found a stray 
hat in their room with the initials F. R. in it. 

Records returned from Topeka Thursday 
evening. He was sent there by Professor Erf 
to test some dairy cpws for advanced registra- 
tion. 

The Farm Department has begun harvesting. 
On June 2 the winter barley was cut. Professor 
Ten Eyck says it will yield sixty bushels to the 
acre. 

The Herald reporter, who throws slang 
around to beat the band, says that the Herald 
next week will appear on Wednesday and will 
be a dinger. 

H. C. Kyle has resigned his position in the 
Farm Department and gone to Worcester, Ohio, 
as assistant in agronomy at the Ohio Experi-. 
ment Station. 

Jeffs and Wilber wish to announce that they 
are related, inasmuch as they once went swim- 
ming in the same creek. This they say made 
them suckers. 

Professor Willard left Monday evening for 
Durant, Okla., where he will give expert testi- 
mony in a case involving the illegal sale of 
oleomargarine. 

Two new additions were made to the families 
of Prof, and Mrs. R. R. Price and Prof, and 
Mrs. E. B. MeCormick last week. In each 
case it was a son. 

Allen Philips has been working overtime 
lately in getting the material for the annual Y. 
M. C. A. handbook together. It will be larger 
and better than ever. 

The Mechanical Department is constructing 
a metal flag pole to be placed on the main 
building. It will be forty-five feet high and 
will be made of 5-ineh steel tubing. 

Miss Charlotte Morton gave an informal 
party for her sister from Washburn, under the 
pines near Lovers' Lane, Saturday evening. 
About sixteen people were present. After, some 
dainty refreshments, they amused themselves 
by dancing the Virginia reel. 

Professor Ten Eyck has started something new 
in putting up alfalfa. As soon as the alfalfa 
is cut it is stacked upon a ventilated foundation 
eighteen inches high. One stack has three ven- 
tilators running through the stack. The Pro- 
fessor claims that he can get better hay and at 
the same time put it up cheaply. 

Last week's issue failed to mention the death 
of Gertrude Brink, only daughter of Prof, and 
Mrs. CM. Brink. She had been ill for some 
time and died May 26 of typhoid pneumonia. 
She was fourteen years old, a member of the 
Baptist church, and a favorite with all who 
knew her. The sympathy of the student body is 
extended to Professor Brink and family. 



488 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



t 

i 



SNAPPY SUITS 



PROM THE WORLD'S 
BEST MAKERS X X 



FOOTWEAR 
Latest 

Fads 



Step in for a moment and be convinced that our 
store is the place to get the earliest points on 
JUST WHAT TO WEAR .' 

JOHN COONS, of Course 



Hot 
Weather 
SHIRTS 



5 
i 



Beautiful line of gold watches for gradua- 
tion gifts at Askren's. 

McClaskey is working on a job of lettering 
for the Farm Department. 

Frank Harris spent Sunday in Manhattan, 
He is weighing mail between Salina and Kan- 
sas City. 

J. L. Pel ham has secured a good position 
for the summer teaching" at institutes in 
Nebraska, 

Charles Appleton /<«/>- Elazzanl will finish his 
school work to-day and will soon leave for 
parts unknown. 

Professor Kinzer has returned from Storm 
Lake, Iowa, where he has been attending a dis- 
persion sale of Augus cattle. 

Miss Eva Train, freshman last fall, came up 
from Kansas City Friday to visit her sister 
for the remainder of the term. 

F. A. Kiene went to Kansas City Monday 
morning, returning that evening, on business 
connected with the "'06 Banner." 



Alumni Notes. 



O. H. Legg, freshman last year, is running a 
job printing office at Hutchinson. 

Rees Washington, '05, left Monday for Vir- 
ginia where she will spend the summer visiting 
relatives. 

Elva Akin, '05, and Gussle McCormick, of 
Zeandale, attended Memorial Day exercises at 
Manhattan. 

Jessie Sweet, '05, left last Friday for Topeka 
where she has a position as matron of the asy- 
lum hospital. 

The "Gamma Iota Sigmas" met at the home 
of Katharena Winter, '01, Monday evening, to 
arrange for their Commencement week fes- 
tivities. 



Ralph Joss, student in '04, was in Manhat- 
tan a few days last week. He has been clerk- 
ing in a store at Sabetha. 

A bundle shower was given at the home of 
Mrs. C. C. Jackson, near Westmoreland, for 
Anna O'Daniel, '03, last week. Miss Daisy 
Crans entertained the "Treble Clef" for her 
recently. 



Just So 



The fellow who wants 
things "Just so" wants to see 

The 

"SUFFOLK" 
SACK 
SUIT 

"Put ui>" for the particu- 
lar! Style kinks that are 
welcome sights to the roan 
of taste. 

Men's per fectrHttlnK union 
suits, $1 to 92.50. 
Men's new sailors.lt to $4, 
New soft shirts. 75c to $8. 

When are you 
coming In? 




Copyright 1906 

6 Kuppenhelmer it Co. 

Chicago 



E. L. Knostman 



New and IfW 
School Books 



Spectacles 

Go Id- Pens 



R. E. LOFINCK 

College Text-Books Sporting Goods 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. ColWp Sunnily Tv«*i rt « a 

Sporting Goods. 10 to 20 PER CENT OFF ON% BLES ' * ** 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 



Manhattan Candy Kit 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 




Phone 167 




All Kinds of- 



WeSell 

THE BEST 



Fountain: 



ream 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink 
: ICE CREAM SODAS — 



Finest 






Sep 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. fl If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until faxing." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
<J Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter! val^ f Buy 

your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm mvestinents by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

UAMTIIAL 



CHICAGO 

- Randolph tod Canal S ta 

PHILADELPHIA 

1*13 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drumm Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

1S1 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and T7",Yoric Street 

WINNIPEG 
wOfcDermet Avenue 






r 



Our Young Men's Suits | 



WE TAKE SPECIAL PAINS IN PROVIDING 

JUST THE RIGHT KIND 

of Clothes for the Young Man from 16 to 20 years of age. Our suits 
have the desired amount of style in cut and make-up, while the fabrics 
are the most appropriate. "We think we know exactly what the Young 
Men want to wear, and we have made ready for them 

You'll Find Our Suits Different 

They are $10.00, $12.50, $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 and $22.00. 



|W 



. S. ELLIOT 



312 

POYNTZ 

AVE. 




Graduation Presents 

Wedding Presents 

THIS IS THE MONTH 



The Big Racket 

Is the place. Another splendid lot of ladies' collars, latest styles, Racket 
prices. Turnovers, embroideried stocks, lace stocks, sew collar and cuff 
sets for short sleeves, and all the new things. :: 



.^'r 






' T \ r ~\ k p f * i '' A 









— *i 



T&Aiz Students' Herald 



1 



■ 



Published by the Students 
of the Kama* State Agri- 
cultural College X A) 





\ 



Commencement Number 

ft- 




I 

I 




FIRST-GRADE BUTTER 

« M ™SL w it«t b Sf EJS!^ »&?l S* ***** aemwkto it. The 
creameries waot to furnish it. But to do so, they must have flrst- 

CtffiS'ffl!? ^ OT *J? lll f B< ? n ^ er 0f tllwn «• wminito iSyll 
*££«£>« aSiffti'in«^2i°, f tt«w»n»owcM»«Wfim 
SSSSSJS^ViS?" 7 wm lnoroa8 «. tor the u»e of farm separators is ln- 
2£££%J& torn aeparator not only snakes tt» farmer mom 

easier. The situation Is plain. The creamery mast have flret-frrade 
oreem and the farmer Is hound to use tbe hand separator Tw£ 

I22 ^ e Se i lSp?STed U8e, """* " " p ** to *W"Sr*«38S 



i 



i 



U.S. CREAM 



I 

I 



SEPARATOR 

£ an f^^f * heavier cream than any other and do it without elomrimr 

The U. S. has the record of skimming a cream testing 6J^r <£Su 

And remember: The U. S. holds the World's Record for dean Sklnsmlitg. 

Gets the Most Cream and Will Deltar as Heavy a Cream as You Want 

thn °t r <ftL2 *2&m!2£t22!£2P a & SB ghawf £ y «e»~te illustrations why 
<?»"• ?• can Mdm Plrat g ra d s cream, how It won the World's Record and wh* 

VERMONT FARM flACHINE CO. 



I 



BELLOWS FALLS, 



VBRflONT 




Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

BOYS! 



CO TO 



FOR 

Ice-cream and 

Ice-cream sodas 

HOLBERTS 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturer* of 
Sweep and Power Peed Mills. Disc Cultivators Safety 
Com Harvesters, little Wonder Chums, Perfection 
Lawn Swings, Oak Stoves. Sash Weights, Chimney Cans 
Cast-iron Hog Troughs, Structural Iron Work, Store Bel 
pairs, ete. :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: .. 

MANHATTAN, -:■ .;. 



KANSAS 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Manhattan 

Transfer Line 



Electric-Lighted & 

Heated Busses 

& Hacks 



Day and night baggage lint, 

Meet all trains day or night, 
Large Wagonettes and Park 
Phaetons suitable lor ball 
games, etc. Let us call 
your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a 
specialty. 



PHONE 65 

H. J. BarnhoiiK -:. L »,. Phillip* 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



489 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cttfurs and toilet 
articles, Razors honed, 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS l/V 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



DR. C. P. BLACHLY 



Porcelain inlay fillings a specialty 



Office over Anderson's Bookstore 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 

nEAT, V EGETAB LES, Etc. 

PHONE ■ . - 33 



For the BEST ICE-CREAM and 
COLD SODAS, go to 

Kl NG'S 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Walt for 



THE WORK WE 
HAVE DONE IN THE 
PAST IS OUR BEST 
RECOMMENDATION 



WOLF'S 

COTTAGE - STUDIO 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Ph*> nc 55 



ORR'S STUDIO 

North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Photo of any size or style. Souvenir Postal 

Cards of College and 1. O. O. F. Home 

FOR SALE 



the Wagons. 



Phone 157 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz R C. HOSTRUF, Prop, 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

at ENGEL BROTHERS 



ao to 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best* X> 3*> 

W. U STDSfGLEY & CO, 



490 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 



M 



m&MM 



DEALE 



Dry- Goods 

Fans for the ffirl gradu- 
ates. 

We have a nice assort- 
ment of dainty fans and 
the prices range from 50c 
to $1,50 each. 

New patterns in 

ALL-OVER 
EMBROIDERY 

for waists. 



New 
Laces. 



Val and Torchion 



Krippendorff-Dittmann Go's 
Ladles' Shoes 

They are the best you can buy. 

Ladies' Gymnasium 

Slippers 

$1 and $1.35 



Ready-to-wear goods 
Com mence men t 



for 



A complete new line of dainty 
Waists. White and colored shirt- 
waist suits. New designs In white 
woolen, duck and linen skirts. 

McCALL PATTERNS, 10c and 
15c. None higher. 



To the Students 

We want to thank you 
for your generous pat- 
ronage during the past 
year and wish you a 
very pleasant and prof- 
itable vacation. Those 
who return next fall we 
will be very glad to 
welcome and do our 
best to make you and 
your friends feel at 
home in our store. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up-stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry -Good 8, Head y-to- wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 







Removal Sale 

at 

The Leader 


DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. . . 

Porcelain bath tubs fine line cigars and toilet articles 


PROFE88IONA L. 


Our shelves are full, and we have 
a large reserve stock. We are sell- 
ing our oxfords and one lot of shoes 
at 20 per cent off, one lot of shoes 
30 per cent off, which is removing 
them from our shelves to the 
CUSTOMERS' FEET. Dry-goods 
and furnishings at lowest cash 
price. Yours to please, 


VWWWWVM 


DR. G. A. CKISE, DENTIST. 

34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 


DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 

Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. Phone 187. 


Res. Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bid*., Downstairs. Office Phone 307 


Moore Bros. & Co. 




Office phone 41 1 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCorniiek, Dentist 

Room 16. Union National Bank Building 







I 

CO 

1 

X 



-a 

1 




Volume XI. 



Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhe Students Or The . 
Kansas Statc Agricultural College 

Mot^):LetEveiyOQeGmtivatgrli3 OmaGenios. 

Number 38 



Manhattan, Kan., June 14, 1906. 



The Senior Play, 

Last Tuesday evening- about twenty-five mem- 
bers of the class of 1900 presented their three- 
act comedy, "The Gypsy Queen," to an appre- 
ciative audience. Each part was well presented, 
showing much care in the selection of the per- 
sonnel, and diligent practice by those selected. 
Miss Lincoln, of Topeka, who had charge of 
the practice, deserves mention for her good 
work. The new scenery, which allows three 
complete changes, was well adapted to the play 
and gave a depth to the stage. The settings 
were well arranged and all parts well worked 

out. 

As the circus posters would state, there was 
"not a dry moment." The curtain rises while 
a party of picnickers are engaged in their 
revelry. A gypsy soloist is introduced, to- 
gether witii a bunch of his tribe, who retire 
upon failure to receive any donations. The 
act properly begins when Richard Harding de- 
mands of Irene Dare, the gypsy queen, that her 
son, Joseph Dare, shall cease paying attention 
to the father's daughter, Inez. The prospective 
match is agreeable to the mother, who boldly 
says so and cites enough of Mr. Harding's past 
to him to convince him that she is a thorn in 
his path in his desire to control the fortune left 
to Inez at the time of her mother's death. He 
is desirous of Inez marrying a city chap, Holt 
by name, who has so little brains as to be but 
a figure head, and thus control the money he 
can not otherwise use. Dora Sharp, a coquette, 
and Savage, a jealous lover, are introduced, 
who further complicate Harding's almost 
thwarted plans. The picnickers hurry home on 
the approach of a thunder storm, but Dare is 
detained in consultation with Harding to whom 
he swears that he shall never disgrace Inez by 
marrying her so long as his name remains the 
same as that of his sinful father. The daugh- 
ter becomes defiant when she hears of Dare's 



oath and says she will marry him anyway. 

The curtain falls after the gypsy queen has 

again made things interesting. 
In the second act, which embraces three 

scenes, the brainless Holt plays an important 

part. The first scene is Irene's home while 

Holt and Dora are enjoying themselves. 

Savage stops things in time for the second 

scene. 
This is a month later and the result is that 

the coquette, in a round about way, refuses to 

marry Holt but gets let in to a few secrets. 

The third scene is Harding's home. Holt 
and Inez are about to be joined in marriage 
by the evangelist when the fatal step is pre- 
vented by the arrival of Irene Dare. The 
preacher takes a hand in matters and a little 
gun exhibition furnishes a tahleau. 

Act three introduces the gypsy camp. 
Things move rapidly, during which time 
Savage and Dora fall out and make up again. 
Irene Dare attempts to force her son to marry 
Inez that evening as she has arranged it, 
despite his oath to Harding. He refuses even 
when Inez urges it, and when Harding enters a 
general assault is stopped only upon the 
arrival, a "little later, of the -gypsy queen and 
gypsies. Here, where all concerned are face to 
face, Harding is brought to judgment and 
states the facts surrounding his life. On the 
gypsy's testimony it appears that Harding's 
child and Irene's child were simply inter- 
changed at the daughter's birth, by the gypsy, 
who was the nurse. The marriage of Inez and 
Joseph is then sanctioned and performed in 
gypsy style, at the end of which Irene is 
crowned queen of the gypsies. 

The play is a little apt to tax the imagination 
and throw the performance into exaggerated 
circumstances. Several points are difficult to 
catch, while one or two essential points do not 
seem to readily follow from the preceding part 



494 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 






of the play. These criticisms however, affect 

the writer and not the pi avers. The play is 

well interspersed with music in the way of 

choruses and solos. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS. 

Irene Dare, "The Gypsy Queen," a woman with ahfs- 
OTV Edith Worden 

Richard Hardin*, a man with a history Earl J. Evans 

Dora Sharp, a heartless coquette Verda Murphy 

Geortre Holt, so awfully nervous & M Graham 

Frank Savajre, u jealous lover Georjre Spohr 

Joseph Dare. Irenes adopted son E. A. Writrht 

Inez, Harding's reputed daughter Doris Train 

Alolphus Swipen. a cowl>oy evangelist... W. B. Thurston 

Chorus of Gypsies. 

Picnickers. 

Shut-out tor Randolph. 

Shut-out number six was administered by K. 
S. A. C. last Thursday when the Randolph 
team took the little end of a 5 to score. For 
three years the Randolph hoys have been play- 
ing ball, never tasting defeat hut always win- 
ning. They had coine to regard themselves as 
almost invincible, and they had the support of 
tlie entire country. During the game the stores, 
the hotel, the bank and the telephone exchange 
all closed their doors, while the people went 
out to see the home team win. Mo it of the con- 
fidence of the Randolph funs was placed in 
their pitcher, "Rig Nellie" Richards, so when 
the College hoys lit on him for five safe ones 
in the first inning, their sorrow was exceeded 
only by their surprise. 

The game started like this: Herb. Strong 
got a single, M all on got a two bagger, Al. 
Strong hit for three bases, and Cave and 
Miller for one each. Then the smoke cleared 
away and three runs had been scored. Tn the 
fourth inning and again in the eighth the Col- 
lege boys scored one run. Rut little trouble 
was experienced in getting next to the Ran- 
dolph pitcher. Miller led at the bat, getting 
three hits and two robl>eries out of five balls 
thrown to him in five times at bat. Cave and 
Herb. Strong each got two hits, and Mai Ion, 
Al. Strong and Porter one each. In the field 
the boys played faster than at any time during 
the year, Herb. Strong and Cunningham doing 
especially well. Fury pitched a fine game, al- 
lowing only two hits. He was unfortunate in 
getting a had hit over the eye in the fourth in- 
ning, but he finished the gaarie in good shape. 
Immediately after the game he signed up with 
the Leonardville team for the summer. We 
hope that he will make. good and we believe 
that he will. 

The Randolph team played good bull. They 
made five errors, but they were not costly. 
Had they been able to connect with Fury's 
balls the game would have been a close one. 



RANDOLPH. AB B H PO A E 

Kendall, H.. If * ° « 

Gibson.Sb » $ 2 3 

Kichards.p 4 4 1 

Dial.Hh 3 I (). 

Moore, M 3 o i i & 

Kendall. E. c 3 1 II 

Peterson, of 8 

Martinson, rf 8 1 1 

Holrastrom. lb 3 00 2 

Totals 20 2 27 5 

K. S. A. 0. AB B H PO A B 

Strony.H-.lf .-■• 5 12 4 

Hullon.Sh 4 1 10 2 

Strontr, Al.cf 5 1110 

Cave. 2b 5 2 11 1 

Haynes.lb 5 9 

Miller, c 5 3 10 

Porter, rf •* 1 10 

Cunningham, ss. 3 2 6 

F urv p . 3 1 

Totals 39 5 10 27 9 I 

Score by innings: 

K. S. A. C 3-0-0— 1-0-- 0-0-1-0=5 

Randolph 0-0-0-0-O-C-O-O 0=0 

Summary: Earned runs- K, S. A. C, 4; two- 
base hits— Mallon and Cave: three-base hits 
Al. Strong; stolen bases— H. Strong, Mallon, 
Miller, Porter, Cunningham, and Fury: struck 
out— by Fury 8, by Richards II: bases on halls 
—off Richards, I; hit by pitched hall- Rich- 
ards 1, Fury 1. Umpire, Abeam. 

Track Athletics. 

Our athletic history is short, hut it makes 
interesting reading. The chapter on baseball 
is the longest, and the one on track a thletics is 
the shortest. It also tells i story of the great- 
est success. The present season marks our 
second appearance as a contestant for track 
honors. In fact, it may be said that our last 
year's appearance was merely a bow and that 
this is really our first attempt. 

For ten years an annual interclass field meet 
has been held some time during the spring 
term. These annual meets mu-t have been very 
exciting events even though they failed to in- 
spire the participants with a desire for further 
honors in other fields. Almost every year the 
entire set of College records would be broken 
and a new set made. For instance, the Herald 
of May 25, 1898, reports that the winner in 100- 
yard dash made the. entire distance in the time 
of 11^ seconds, while the 22t> yard was won in 
exactly 30 seconds. Even though the winners 
of these and other events were in school for 
some time, no attempt was ever made to meet 
another school until next year. The only 
meet of last year, that with the State Normal, 
resulted in a victory for the teachers by a 
score of 78 to on*. Coach Melick worked hard 
for the team and his work of last year helped 
to make this year's team successful. 

This year our first rival was Raker Univer- 
sity. Baker had held K. S. N. down to a 
margin of one point and we expected a close 
meet here. We thought that our team was 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



495 



■ 


Kansas State Meet. 


Topeka, Kan., May 28, 1906. 




EVBNT. 


First. 


Record. 


Second. 


Third. 


Fourth. 


ino-yurcl dash 

Shot Put. 


Oaln, K. S. A. C...... 

Walkins. K. 8. A. C. 

Murine. C. of E 

Milltnan. K. S. A. C 
Mantle. C. of E , 

Bitftfer, C. of E , 

MeMUltn. Cooper 

Milliyan. K. S. A.C. 

Islev, Fairmount 

Williams, Washburn 
•Carr. K. S. A. C... 

K. S. A. C 


MJs 

10 ft. 4 in.... 
36 ft. 4 in.... 

4 m. 4fl S . . . . 
30 ft. 64 in . . 

223 s 

I7Ss 

108 ft. 9 in . . 
Big s 

5 ft. 5 in ... . 
2m. Tils.... 
05 ft. 5 in.... 

37£s 

10 m. m. s . . 
3m 41% s..,. 


Murphy. St. Mary's 
Oskins. K. S. A. C. 
Senn, K. S. A.C... 

Curt. (,'. of E 

Wutkins. K.S. A.C. 
Cain. K.S. A.C... 
Culbertson.C.of E 
Honska, Normal. .. 
Erven, Normal. 
Oskins, IC. S. A. C. 


Nuaner. Normal 

JMarple, C. of E 
Suillvan. St. Mary's. 

Miller, Normal". 

Weede. Washburn.. 

Erven. Normal 

N.vbertr. K. S. A.C 
Solter. Fail-mount. .. 
Isley. Fainnount 


Culbertson, C. of E. 
t Weede. Washburn 
Robb, Washburn 


Mile Run 


Stauffer. fct. S. A. C. 


120-yard Hurdle.,. 
Hammer Throw.. 

440-yard Dash 

High Jttmpt 

i-mlle Run 


Hitftfer, C. of E, 
Weede. Washburn 
Hnnriss, Normal 
Mantle, C. of E. 
Litton. Washburn 


Davidson. Normal.. 
Senjr. K. S. A. C... 
*Bl(rirer. C. of E.... 
Howard, 0. of E. .. 
Normal 


Thurston. K. S. A.C. 
Solter. Fairmount . . . 

Rvan. Fairmount 

C. of E 


Stauffer. K. S. A. C. 


1 HsCUH 


Hollister. Washburn 


•230-yard Hurdle. .. 
2-mile Run 


.lones. K. S. A. C. 
Thurston K.S. A.C. 


1-mile Relny 


Fairmount 



"Tied for llrst place. 

tWatkins. K. S. A. C; Robb. Washburn; and Darling, Fairmount: tied for third place. 

JTied for third place. 



better than it was last year, but no one ex- 
pected to see such improvement. The final 
score of the meet was 101 to 29. Baker made 
most of her points by winning thirds. Our 
Warn won first in every event and second in 
more than half of them. 

The second public appearance of the team 
was in five State Intercollegiate meet at Topeka 
where the "farmer*" won over the. six other 
schools which were entered* College of Rm- 
poria was our closest competitor, but we left 
them far in the rear in the last few events. 

The third and last meet of the year was that 
held with K. U. When the meet was arranged 
for no one thought that we even stood a light- 
ing chance to win, hut the tight race we gave 
them for first place gave every one a surprise. 

Next year the team will be composed of more 
experienced men and it will be more successful 
than this year. Even K. U. will be left behind, 
and we will hold the State championship. Mr. 
Melick will probably coach the team, and Mil H- 
gan has been elected as captain. 

The men who have won fifteen points this 
season and who are therefore entitled to a K. 
A. are: Watkins, Milligan,Oskins, Cain, Edel- 
blute, and Seng. Stauffer, Bealey, Thurston. 
Nyberg, Carr, Jones and Farrar have also 
done good work, but have failed to get their 
lifteen points. _^_ 

A Good Memory. 

Memory is defined as the mind's power to 
retain the knowledge of past events or ideas 
which are past. The word is not applied uni- 
form! ly in the same precise sense, but it always 
expresses some modification of that faculty 
which enables us to treasure up and preserve 
for future use the knowledge that we acquire— a 
faculty whieh is.no doubt, the great foundation 
of intellectual improvement. The word "mem- 
ory" is often used to express a capacity for re- 
aming knowledge, and this is the way that we, 



perhaps, as students, apply the term. Perhaps 
its most Important meaning is the power to re- 
call knowledge previously gained when we have 
occasion to use it. 

But whatever way we use the word or hear 
others use it we think of a good memory as 
something of great value; a priceless possess- 
ion, without which no mind is complete; a gem 
that cannot be stolen, that wealth cannot buy; 
yet without which many men would be failures 
and very few be successful. 

It is, however, something we all possess, and 
it mny be improved by training. As the black- 
smith's arm grows stronger through constant 
use, and the delicate touch of the pianist is 
developed by practice, so memory can be per- 
fected through incessant drill; though poor 
and worthless at first, it may become of inesti- 
mable value to the owner. 

Some memories cannot easily hold a particu- 
lar cla*8 of ideas, but readily retain another 
class. And this is well; take, for example, the 
class of great mathematicians who, though hav- 
ing received a broad education, now know little 
but the one subject on which the whole of the 
powerful mind is centered. Were it not for this 
we would find very few highly developed minds, 
which we admire so much, but only the ques- 
tionable class sometimes called "walking en- 
cyclopedias"— well informed, but unsystema- 
tized. On the whole, we find in memory one of 
the most useful of the mind's faculties, and in 
its development or its neglect a strong and 
sufficient reason for success or failure.— Alpha 
Beta Gleaner/ 



A traveling man received the following tele- 
gram from his wife: "Twins arrived to-night. 
More by mail. ' ' He went at once to the nearest 
office and sent the following reply: "I leave 
for home to-night. If more come by mail, 
send to dead letter office."— Springfield Republic. 



496 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



M 



Baseball Review. 

A custom has long been established which 
decrees that at the end of each school year the 
Herald shall contain a review of the baseball 
season. In some past years there may have 
been a tendency to neglect this review, but this 
year we have no such feeling, for our baseball 
team, like each of our other athletic teams of 
the year, has made the best record in our his- 
tory. For this reason we take special pride in 
making a few backward glances at what has 

been done. 

The team lias played sixteen college games, of 

which twelve have been won, three lost, and one 
tied. The games lost were to K. U., Wash- 
burn, and Nebraska. The tie game was with 
the State Normal. We defeated K, U. in one 
game, however, ' so we broke even with them. 
We also defeated Washburn twice, and there 
is no question as to the relative strength of 
the two teams. The best game played by our 
boys was at Baldwin, when they defeated 
Baker in an errorless game by a score of 2 
to 1. The poorest game was the first one, 
that against Nebraska, in which the College 
team made eleven errors and were shut out 10 
to 0. The team participated in eight shut-out 
games during the season, in seven of which they 
held the big end of the score. One of the 
strongest points of the team has been the bat- 
ting. In the seventeen college games played the 
"farmers" have secured one hundred forty 
hits to their opponents seventy -seven. In the 
same games they have made sixty-four errors, 
while the other fellows were making ninety- 
four. 

During the season, fifteen men have played 
on the College team. Of these, eleven have won 
the greatest honor that a college athlete can 
win— that of wearing a K. A. The men who 
have thus distinguished themselves are Captain 
Cunningham, Mai Ion, Miller, Coldwell, Fury, 
Haynes, Cave, Kahl, Herb. Strong, Ah Strong, 
and Porter. The other four men— Hayes, Davis, 
Topping, and Myers— did not play in a suffi- 
cient number of games. The team was composed 
of one senior, five juniors, six sophomores, 
and three freshmen. The individual playing 
record of each of the eleven regular men is 
given below: 

Fielding Record. Ratting Record. 

PO A B AV. AB H SH SB AV. 

Cunningham 24 55 15 .840 69 13 6 10 IKK 

Million..." 23 49 3 .960 73 20 3 4 274 

MUler 135 13 6 .061 69 16 5 10 23-> 

Haynes 195 4 9 .956 71 14 4 2 197 

Cave 33 40 10 .886 69 25 4 5 >M 

Kahl 8 15 3 .885 19 5 3 4 263 

H. Strong (outtleld). 30 2 .937 *8 2L 2 II HD 

H. Strong (tntleld)... 1 3 .250 .... 

Al. Strong 25 1 5 .839 60 20 4 7 ma 

Porter 20 2 3 .889 65 16 6 6 Jtt 

Coldwell 12 3 .800 14 4 1 !ttS 

Fury 1 9 1 .909 20 4 f | Jqq 

Team 888 254 



The record of the games played is given 
below: 

K.A.C. 

St. Paul American Association 22 1 

Nebraska University 10 

Washburn College 1 8 

College of Emporia (I 13 

Haskell Institute 11 

Baker University 1 2 

Kansas University 6 8 

Fort Riley 1 fi 

Ottawa University 7 23 

Baker University 1 14 

Kansas State Normal 1 

Kansas State Normal 2 2 

Washburn College 7 2 

Fairmount College 3 4 

Kansas University fi 4 

Friends University 8 

Washburn College 4 

Haskell Institute 13 

Randolph 5 

Total points «7 12W 

The players have all done fine work this year. 
They have been faithful at practice and have 
played their best in every game. Most of them 
will be back next year, and we fully expect that 
this year's record will be equalled if not sur- 
passed. The students are proud of the men who 
have represented the school this season, and 
in the years to come we feel sure that the sup- 
porters of college athletics will look back on 
the '(Hi team with as much pride as we now 
feel. 

What Some of Them WW Do. 

Torje Carlson will run a small part of the 
Santa Fe Railroad. 

Bunn Thurston will milk cows and sell milk 
in Colorado Springs. 

Marcia Turner will "keep house for 

mother." 

Ruth Neiman will camp out for awhile and 
then l>e at home. 

Tom Wood takes charge of a telephone com- 
pany at White City, Kan., after Commence- 
ment. 

Gertrude Hole will specialize here next year. 
Hastings: "I am not living for myself and 
aim has not decided yet what I will do." 

Schroeder takes up the dairy business in a 
few weeks. 

Arthie Edworthy is "going home to sleep." 
She will take the civil service examination for 
hospital matron some time this summer. 

Laura Lyman will visit in Washington, D. 
C, for awhile. 

Winifred Dalton takes Miss Hougham's po- 
sition in the Botanical Department. 

Verda Murphy will be governess at the I. O. 
O. F. Home at Eureka lake. 

(Concluded on page 501.) 





Coach Ahearn 



Arthur Furey 




Carl Mallon 




Captain Cunningham 





"Shorty" Haynes 



Bea Cave 





"Choppy" Coldwell 



Harry Porter 





Grover Kahl 



AL Strong. 





Herb. Strong. 



Carl Miller 




H, 

O 

(5 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



501 



Henry Spuhler will work in an architect's 
office in Evansville, Ind. 

Wren Thurston and Pat Brown will work for 
the Western Electric Company, at Kansas City. 

Auman, Bealy, Kirk, Gil Word, Harrison, 
and Ha /.en will be farmers. 

Earl Evans will stay in Manhattan and work 
for the Chicago Lumber Co. 

Maxwell will teach dairying at Tuskegee 
Institute. 

Mary Copley and Daisy Harner will take 
post graduate work here next fall. 

Ramsey will work for a refrigerating machine 
manufacturing company in York, Penn. 



1897. 
WON. 

1. Ft. Riley 4-3 1. 

2. Ft. Riley. 12-4 2. 

3. 



LOST. 

Washburn 6-4 

K. U.* ... .9-0 



1886. 



WON. 

1. Washbumt. 

2. Wesley an .", 



Charley Jones will "raise cotton" near 
Montgomery, Ala. 

Dow will draw pay from a construction com- 
pany in Kansas City. 

R. H. Sanneman expects to attend an archi- 
tectural school next winter in Philadelphia. 

Mattie Pitman will teach domestic science in 

Topeka. 

Edith Forsythe and Stella Campbell will be 
at home— "for awhile," likewise Helen Inskeep. 
Tom White will sell views and go to Ann 
Arbor, Mich., next fall to study law. 

Weaver, Graham, Elder and Davis will go 
to the General Electric Company at Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Wright and White will work for the Bullock 
Electrical Company at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Coldwell and Heim will take up work with 
the Westinghouse Company at Pittsburg, Penn. 
Ferris and Wilson will assume some of the 
care and responsibility of the Western Elec- 
trical Company, in Chicago. 

Hawkinson will be ai home in Las Vegas, 
New Mexico. 

Boline Hanson, Alma McRae and Edna 
Brenner will take institute work and teach in 
Riley county next year. 

Arthur Kiene, Jr., will help bis father farm 
and raise cattle near Topeka. 
Several will look for jobs or take some that 

are now in sight. 

K. S. A. C.'s Baseball Record for Ten Years. 
Below is a list of games played by the K.S. 
A. C. baseball teams beginning with the year 
1897, showing number won and lost with scores. 
With the exception of Ft. Riley only inter- 
collegiate games are considered. A star (*) 
indicates that the game was played away from 
home while a dagger (t) means the game was 
won by forfeit. Signal victories appear in 
boldfaced type. 



LOST. 

.9-0 1. Normal 27-4 

,11-5 2. Nebraska 22-H 

3. Washburn.... 14- 12 

4. Wesleyan 10-14 



1899. 



WON. 
1. Ft. Riley t. 



.9-0 



1. 
2. 
3. 

4. 
5. 



1900. 



WON. 

1. Wesleyan 19-4 

2. Ft. Riley 12-10 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 

'7. 



LOST. 

Washburn 11-7 

Missouri 11-9 

K. U 14-5 

Nebraska 10-1 

Washburn* 8-2 



LOST. 

Normal 22-2 

K. U.t 9-0 

Haskell 11-3 

Haskell 13-0 

St. Mary's* 7-1 

Haskell* 8-0 

Ft. Riley* 6-0 



1901, 



WON. 

1. Baker l«-3 

2. Weslevan 23-4 

3. Haskell 5-tt 

4. Highland Park .2-1 



1. 
2. 
3." 
4. 
5. 
«. 
7. 



LOST. 

K. U 10-0 

Washburn 9-1 

Nebraska 11-3 

Haskell* 0-5 

K. U.* 10-1 

Washburn* 8-7 

St. Mary's* 4-2 



1002. 



WON. 

1. Ft. Riley 8-0 

2. Ottawa 12-3 

3. Wesleyan 6-5 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



LOST. 

Bethanvt* 9-0 

Ft Riley 4-0 

Washburn...... 12-0 

Nebraska 15-7 

K. U 9-2 



Team disbanded at mid-terra. {Flunks.) 



LOST. 

1. Ottawa 13-8 

2. Haskell* 9-3 

3. K. U.* 9-1 



1003 
WON. 

1. K. V l»-« 

2. Bethany* 14-7 

3. Wesleyan* 10-4 

4. Baker* 14-10 

5. Bethany 9-8 

0. Baker 8-4 

7. Creighton 10-8 

8. Nebraska 5-2 

The big flood prevented finishing out the 
schedule. 



1904. 



WON. 



LOST. 



1. Bethany* 9-0 1. Bethany 3-0 

2. Ft. Riley .7-6 2. Baker* 7-4 

^l Raker 16-1. 3. Normal*t »-*J 

I NSrmaV..:: ,4-5 4. St. Mary's*. .. ..0-4 



o. K. U 7-» 



6. Ft. Riley 



j* .84 6. 



Washburn 11-6 

Washburn* 3-0 



-)02 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



1005. 



WON. 



rx>ST. 



1. Highland Park 5-0 1. St. Mary's* 3-2 

2. Haskell ll-l 2. St. Mary's 2-1 

3. Normal 5-2 3. Washburn S-3 

4. Washburn* 0-4 4. Washburn <>-l 

5. Colorado 4-1 5. Normal* 10-0 

6. Friends 0-5 8. Baker 7-4 

7. K. U «-4 7. Baker* 8-5 

8. K. U.* 6-1 



1. 
2. 
3, 
4. 

5. 
«. 

7. 

8. 

». 

10. 

11. 

12. 
13. 



1906. 
WON. 

Washburn. 8-1 1. 

Emporia Coll.. 13-0 3. 

Ottawa 23-7 3. 

Haskell* 11-0 

Itakor* 2-1 

K. U.* 8-<l 

Ft. Riley 0-1 

Maker 14-1 

Normal 1-0 

Fairmowit 4-3 

Friends 8-0 

Washburn 4-0 

Haskell 13-0 



LOST. 

Nebraska 10-0 

Washburn* 7-2 

K. U 0-4 



Senior Class Roll and Theses. 

Kate Alexander— The Full of Rome. 

Albert Clay Aumann -Plans for Barn-yards. 

Jesse N. Bealcy -Farm Crops as Related to 
Improved Stock-raising'. 

Raymond Russell Birch— The Sheep Industry 
in Kansas. 

Herbert Jefferson Bottomly— The Bacon Hog. 

F. Edna Brenner— Race Elements in the For- 
mation of the English Language, and the Influ- 
ence of these Elements upon English Literature. 

Byron Broom -A Practical Manual Training 
Course: The Selection and Arrangement of 
Exercises in Wood, Forge, and Foundry Work, 

Frank E. Brown -Kellogg System of Switch 
Board Connections. 

John Willard Calvin— A New Method of 
Determining Iron, Nitrites, etc. 

Stella Campbell— Record of Experiments of 
Catering and Standard Dietaries. 

Will Ward Campbell— The Beef Trust. 

Torje Carlson— Efficiency and Rsgulation of 
Gasoline Electric Generators. 

Jamas Hamilton Cheney— Corn Planting. 

Edith E. Coffm an— Experiments in Fireless 
Cookery. 

William Irving Col dwell— The Single Phase 
Railway. 

Archie Conner— The Horse Industry in Kan- 
sas. 

Jessie Leon a (Travis) Cook— A Study of 
Primitive Religion. 

Perry Alfred Cooley— The Botanical Effect 
of Pasturing upon the Native Grasses. 

Ruth Cooley —Dietary Studies— A Family of 
Six. 



Mary Copley -A Study of the Elective Fran- 
chise of the United States. 

Winifred Anna Dalton— A Chemical Exami- 
nation of Certain Baking Powder*. 

Charles Ernest Davis -The' Design and Con- 
struction of a Magnetic Separator. 

Jay I* Dow -Efficiency and Regulation of 
Gasolene Electric Generators. 

Odessa Delia Dow Experiments in Fireless 
Cookery. 

Arthie Aileen Edworthy A Study in the 
Nutritive Value of Special Diets. 

Leonard Roscoe Elder— The Use of the Ro- 
tary Converter in Substations. 

Harriet Marie Esdon -Boundary Lines in 
United States. 

Earl Joy Evans- -Design for a City Hall. 

Smith Faris The Design and Construction 
of a Recording Traction Dynamometer. 

Arba C. Ferris— Plans and Specifications for 
a 50;) Drop Telephone Exchange. 

If, Edith Forsyth— Th Economic Value of 
Electricity in the Kitch.m. 

Charles A. Gilkison— Aberdeen Angus Cattle. 

William Thomas Gilliford -Life and Effi- 
ciency Test of the Tantalum Lamp. 

Lewis M. Graham The Use of the Rotary 
Converter in Substations. 

Rennie Greene- Growing Conifers from the 
Seed. 

Elbert Ernest Greeno ugh— Intensive Farm- 
ing. 

David H. Gripton Catch Crops for Forage 
and Green Manure. 

Ro swell Leroy Hamaker— Comparative Tests 
on Building Stone from College Quarries and 
on Concrete Building Blocks. 

Mary L. Hamilton- The Economic Value of 
Electricity in the Kitchen* 

Boline Hanson -Advantages of Co-educa- 
tion. 

Daisye Ina Harner -Methods Best Adapted 
to the Teaching of Domestic Science in High 
Schools. 

Raymond I). Harrison -Farm Barn. 

Milo M. Hastings— Raw Grains as Human 
Food. 

Clarence L. Hawkinson-Government of 
American Colonies. 

Leslie Eugene Hazen -Rural Architecture and 
Landscape Gardening. 

Harry Russell Heim-Rewinding and Testing 
a Twenty Horse-power D. C. Motor. 

Gertrude Elma Hole The Phosphorus as 
Protein, Lecithin, and Inorganic Compounds 
in the Yolk of an Egg. 

Nellie Dorothy Hughes-Inquiry into the 
Mental Nature of Children. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



503 



Helen C. Inskeep— Bread Making. 

Charles Sumner Jones— Cottonseed -meal as 
a Stock Food. 

Fredric Arthur Kiene— The Future of the 
Beef ludustry in America. 

Clarence Brady Kirk Physiological Aspect 
of Education. 

Laura Lillian Lyman -Systematic Physical 
Training in Schools. 

Charles Wilher McCampbell - Interest as an 
Agency in Mental Development. 

Cora K. McNutt -Record of Experiments of 
Catering and Standard Dietaries. 

Alma McRae- A Summer's Dietary Studies 
for a Family of Four. 

Ernest Wilson Mathcrly— Three Jews of Eag- 
lish Literature: Marlowe's Barabas, Shtike- 
speare'a Shy lock, and Scott's Isaac. 

Henry Green leaf Maxwell -The Dairy Cow as 
a Source of Wealth in America. 

Caroline Morton—Domestic Economy in 
Public Institutions. 

Verda Ellen Murphy The Peculiar Nature 

of Habit. 

Ruth Emma Neiman— The Imitative Phase of 

I n tel lectu a 1 De vol o pment. 

Ross N. Newland - Comparative Tests of In- 
jectors. 

Henry Otto- Bacteria of Inclosed Abscesses. 

John' J. Peckham Comparative Tests of 
Single and Three Ph&»e Induction Motors. 

Martha S. Pittman -Farm Home Economics. 

Lester Allen Ramsey- The Design and Con- 
struction of a Recording Traction Dynamo- 
meter. 

Richard Reece -The Transmission of Elec- 
trical Energy. 

Jessie A. Reynolds English in the Lower 
Grades of the Public Schools. 

Emmit D. Richardson Design and Con- 
struction of a Twenty- five Horse-Power Gaso- 
line Traction Engine. 

Jennie Inez Ritner— Cultivation of House 

Plants for the Window. 

Ramer Henry S an neman- Design for an 
Administration Building for the Kansas 
State Agricultural College. 

William Paul Schroeder— Meats on the 

Farm. 
Martin R->y Shuler-Swa Bads for Wheat 

and Grasses. 

Emily G. Smith-The Place of Interest in 

Education. 
Milton David Snodgrass-The Conformation 

of Beef and Dairy Cattle. 

Mabelle S perry -Inquiry into the Mental 
Nature of Children. 

George A. Spohr— Bacteria of Inclosed Ab- 
scesses. 



Julia C. Spohr— The Choosing Aspect of 
Consciousness. 

Henry Adam Spuhl or—Design for a Library. 

Albert D. Stoddard -Efficiency and Regula- 
tion of Gasoline Electric Generators. 

Ernest Felix Swan son— An Economic Study 
of the Manhattan Waterworks System. 

Elbert Wren Thurston— Plans and Specifica- 
tions for a 500 Drop Telephone Exchange. < 

Warren Runn Thurston —Manufacturing 
Fermented Butter from Sweet Cream. 

D orris M. Train— Estimates in House Fur- 
nishing. 

Marcia Elizabeth Turner— Imagination in 
Child Development. 

Warren Elmer Watkins— Milking Machines. 

Chauncey lies Weaver— Comparative Tests of 
Single and Three Phase Induction Motors. 

Ralph Richard White— The Design and Con- 
struct 'urn of a Magnetic Separator. 

Thomas F. White— A Compromise View of 

the Tariff. 

Edgar M. Wilson -Kellogg System of Switch 
Board Connections. 

Charles H. Withington— Cooking Without 

Fire. 

Thomas M. Wood— A Modern Central Sta- 
tion for a Small Country Village Telephone 

System. 

Edith Worden— What Modern Chemists 
Have Done for Domestic Science. 

Earnest A. Wright— Rewinding and Testing 
a Twenty Horse-power D. C. Motor. 

Walter Seott Wright -The English Cabinet 
System of Government. 

Guy E. Yerkes— A Working Plan for Fores- 
try on the Fort Riley Reservation. 

GRADUATE. 

William Anderson, B. S., 181)8 -A Study of 
the Effect of Mass of the Moving Element on 
the Constant of a Ballistic Galvanometer. 

George Adam Dean, B. S., 181)5— Cocci d;e of 
Kansas. 

Oscar Hugo Halstead, B. S., 181)5-The In- 
terferometer. 

K. Elizabeth Sweet, B. S., 1904— A Study in 
Balanced Dietaries. 

Arthur Kiene Entertains. 

On Thursday evening last week Arthur 
Kiene gave a supper to a few Friends at 
Vance's. Each fellow found his place at the 
table by means of a rebus containing his name. 
The supper was elegant, and the boys had a 
great time. Kiene proves to be as good an 
entertainer as a student and editor. Those 
present were: Adams. Carlson, Jorgenson, 
Winter. Johnson, Kiene, Whipple, and Rever- 
end Gelvin. 



504 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



— = 




KlS 



Malta: LctCvCHV 
Orti CviTnmTt Hi« 

Ow"GtHH»-t- 



Kale red st the post-office at Manhattan, Kan,, as second- 
er hiss matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Sinirte copies, five cents. 

C. E. Whipple. '07 Editor-in-chief 

GitovBH Kahl., '07 Business Manager 

MayGriffinu, '07 Literary Editor 

L, E. Gastoit. '08 Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham, '08. Exchange Editor 

H. It. HtfiLMAN. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. E. IJkik'k. '08 Subscription Manager 

Gback Hawkins. '08' a««™ r^ai mi^k 

A. G. Phillips, W f Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Sweet, '04 .Alumni Editor 

O. W. Weaver, 'OH Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hunjr on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. "04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., June 14, 1906. 




a: editorials a; 






When we return to College next fall we will, 
without doubt, see on the corner of Ninth and 
Freemont a new building- under construction. 
This will be the future home of the Y. M. C. A. 
The building committee are considering some 
important changes in the building, and as 
soon as these are decided on bids will be ad- 
vertised for and the contract let so that work 
may begin this summer. More money is needed 
to complete the building fund, and this is a 
good opportunity for Y. M. C. A. members to 
rustle a little, during the summer, among their 
friends and aid in completing this fund. 



Muchjarogress has been made the past year 
in the Christian associations of the College. 
Much attention has been paid to Bible study, 
the enrolment in the Y. M. C. A. reaching 380. 
The Saturday noon meetings of the Y. W. C. A. 
have been of much help to the girls of the Col- 
lege. A delegation of eleven was sent to 
Nashville for the Student Volunteer Conven- 
tion. Since that time a Student Volunteer 



Band has been organized here with a member- 
ship of 8. Strong cabinets have been chosen 
in each association for the coming year. Dele- 
gations will be sent to the summer confer- 
ences—the Y. M. at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 
June 18-24; the Y. W. at Waterloo, Iowa, 
Aug. 3-14. Much credit is due Mr. McLean 
and Miss Thayer for their efficient work dur- 
ing the year. 



Another class has fought a good fight and 
has finished its course. The Herald wishes 
to join in congratulating them on the laurel 
wreaths they have won. In four years they 
have become a part of this great school, and it 
seems hard to lose them; yet, we are all looking 
to their future and are wishing that it may he 
brilliant. We hope that the friendships formed 
will not have to be broken and that they may 
he amoDg the best friendships in their lives. 
The class has been noted and yet has not been 
notorious. We will not fully appreciate the 
class of 1Mb" until later years; it is invariably 
so. Next year we will be telling the new stu- 
dents and reminding each other of the intellec- 
tual and athletic giants who graduated last 
year. All this makes us feel like rising up 
and thanking the Almighty that we have such 
great opportunities. 



The past year has been a series of successes 
for K. S. A. C. on the athletic field. " A great 
interest has been aroused and we seem to be 
entering a new era. Our football team was the 
best in the history of the College. The basket- 
ball team played basket-ball all the time and 
the baseball and track teams are fresh in our 
memory. The Faculty has been more friendly 
to athletics than ever before. They have con- 
scientiously adhered to the Top^ka conference 
rules and yet they have done much to encourage 
the fellows and have supported their interests. 
Two big excursions have been carried through 
successfully with a splendid attendance. Per- 
haps the beet thing about the whole year's 
work is that our teams have been clean. There 
has been not even a shadow of a doubt as to 
the eligibility of the members of the team. The 
boys have all been representative students who 
star in the class room as well as on the field 
They are nearly all upper classmen, an 
unusual occurrence on any team. It is no 
wonder the boys have been supported. In the 
active workers on the Faculty we have a com- 
bination that is hard to beat. Mike, the idol 
of the students, has worked like a coach 
Ef«ry man on the tsams is his friend and as 
for the rest of us we can't help but be. Melick 
has been a faithful worker on the coaching 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



505 



staff and his track team has surprised us all. 
Professors Hamilton, Dean and Anderson have 
made the financial side a success— a wonder- 
fully important item. On the whole every one 
is satisfied, and we can predict only good 
thing's for the future. The Herald has been 
called "an old athletic sheet." Perhaps it 
has been, we hope so. And we hope to continue 
to support athletics, so you may expect to 
hear more on the same subject next fall. 

On Second Thought 

Most of us. need more conmon sense than we 
have and some of us don't use what little we do 
have. 

Its pretty hard to believe that th3 fellow who 
catches you borrowing stawberries on a moon- 
light night found you accidentally. 

Have you ever noticed the number of students 
loafing around College who try to make you 
believe they are almost worked to death? 

The worst we can wish for the "high school 
brats" who stole our pennant at Topeka is 
that they be sent to the reform school or 
Washburn. 

The only di Iterance we can see in swiping 
class caps or neckties is that in the former the 
victim is snatched hald headed and in the latter 
he is choked to death. 

Our views on the subject of Herald joshes 
is somewhat altered since last week. There is 
a whole lot of difference in giving medieine to 
some one than in taking it in tablespoonful 
doses oneself. 

We used to think that strawberries and cream 
was the best yet, but after eating several quarts 
of that mixture one evening recently we have 
changed our mind, and strawberries and 
cream will tempt us no more. 

We used to worry because we knew that the 
good all die young. Too lats to save us all 
that trouble did we learn that we were to be an 
exception. If you have any fears on this sub- 
ject and receive regular market reports on the 
price of coffins, better stop it and try and think 
that you will be an exception also. 

We have noticed that the average freshman 
wants to be acquainted with every girl in col- 
lege, a sophomore is willing to "cut out" most 
of those not in his classes, a junior narrows 
his list down to a very few and has serious 
thoughts of being "a prominent junior," etc., 
and a senior has either found the "only one" 
or "stags" it to the various college affairs. 

At last the Herald staff will be rewarded. 
The Herald has worked over time this year 
backing and working up support for the College 
teams and up to this time Mike is the only friend 



the Herald had. After a few broad hints an- 
other "prof," with athletic inclinations, has 
invited us over to eat ice-cream. We always 
did like said "prof." Later he backed out, 
he "pifced" and our dream of ice-cream never 
came true. We'll bet 40 cents his wife wouldn't 
let him. Dodd Gaston's 43rd Cousin. 



Shut-out No. 7 

We have lost count of the number of victories 
won by the College team this season, so we will 
designate the victory of last Saturday by the. 
above title. For the second time this season, 
the Haskell braves met the "farmers" and 
were forced to return to their reservation with- 
out crossing the home plate. At the beginning 
of the first inning things looked rather hopeless 
for a shut-out, but fast fielding and a good 
throw by Cunningham cut him off at home, and 
the side was soon rati red without a score. 

Pred Hayes was in the box for his second 
try-out, and he again made good. Only once 
did the Indians land on him for a safe one and 
only one of them got a base on balls. His sup- 
port was rather bum, hut then it wasn't nec- 
essary to play hard for after the third inning 
the "big braves" seemed to give up. Hill did 
the twirling for the visitors, and if his support 
had been better the game would have been more 
interesting. Hill played the whole game for 
Haskell, although Lawrence, the little catcher, 
did his best to "help him." 

Every player on the College team got a safe 
hit, and Mallon, Herb, and Al. Strong, Miller 
and Havnes got two each. Herb. Strong stole 
second every time he got on first, while Al. 
stole a couple and Miller got one. Mallon, 
Cave and Cunningham each got a sacrifice. 

HAHKRI-L. AB 11 H SH PO A K 

L.Dupuis.3b 4 H 1 I 

Brunt"* * 8 4 2 

Murie. lb | | * g J ' 

T.Dupuis.ss - 

Lawreooe.0 * <> S 4 o 

t},wu If 4 1 U 

32. ef 3000100 

BBK*:..v:.. - * j 5 j j ° ? 

flill, p ■ 2 3 

Totals..". » I 3 24 10 7 

K. S. A. C. 

H.Stronir.K I f t ! S « J 

Million. 3b t i t £ I 1 ! 

Al. Stronir. of J | f f I J J 

liave 2b - 4 1 1 2 3 

Miter u 4 S 2 5 1 1 

porter, rr :::.'.:..::*." 4210200 

Cunningham, ss till if n n 

Haynes. lb 5 f f • ■• { ! 

Hayes.p 4 110 15 1 

Totals 37 13 14 3 27 15 5 

By innings: 

Haskell - 0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0= 

Summary: Struck out-by Hill 9, by Hayes 
4; two-base hits— H. Strong and Cunningham; 
bases on balls— off Hill 3, off Hayes 1; bases 
stolen— H. Strong 3, Al. Strong 2, Miller, 0. 



506 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Oley Weaver enjoyed a visit from his sister 
last week. 

Rennie Green came in from Hays to get his 
sheepskin. 

Miss Bernice Dodge is clerking in the Big 
Racket store. 

Arthur Fury will pitch for the Leonard v ill e 
team this summer. 

. Boscoe will spend the summer visiting in 
Minneapolis, Kan. 

Jeffs and Wilber will stay h^re and work in 
the shops this summer. 

C. E. Whipple sails from New York for Co- 
lon, Panama, on June ll.'i. 

Miss Vesta Vancleave, of Kansas City, is the 
guest oT her cousin, Grace Smith. 

In the cadet battle-} around the campus the 
Filipinos acted as scouts for the defenders. 

George Wolf, '0\>, will be back to visit home 
folks and attend the Commencement exercises. 

Anna Hostrup, who has b^en attending the 
Monticello Seminary at Galesburg, 111., is at 
home for summer vacation. 

The freshmen gave a Faculty burlesque party 
in the Girls' Gymnasium Monday evening. 
About sixty-five were present. 

When asked what he was going to do this 
summer Janitor Lewis replied: "Why, I'm 
going to do just as little as possible." 

Mrs. (Ridell) Helstrom, a former student 
here, came up from McPherson to attend the 
wedding of her classmate, Anna O'Daniel. 

The Faculty press agent did good work in 
seeing that the senior-Faculty ball game got 
the right kind of a write up in the city papers. 

We will send you a copy of the midsummer 
number if you will send us your address and 
tell us what you are doing any time before Jul v 
20. 

Doctor Elbrect, head of the Dairy Depart- 
ment of Denmark, visited K. S. A. C. last 
Monday. He was here in the Danish dairy in- 
terests. 

Miss Olga Augspurger, who visited with her 
sister, Cecelia Augspurger, for a few davs, 
returned to her home in Farmer City, 111., fast 
Monday. 

For the benefit of those who wish to partake 
of the College dairy products during Com- 
mencement week, Mr. Melick has on sale in 
the creamery sixty pounds of good cheddar 
cheese. 



Miss Viola Thompson, former student from 
Eskridge, came in Monday for a visit with 
friends and to attend the Commencement 
exercises. 

Prof. J. E. Kammeyer went to Kansas City, 
Kan., on Friday, June 8, and delivered the an- 
nual commencement address at the Kansas City 
University. 

Dexter Hnlloway has been limping around 
for some time on account of a lame knee 
caused by getting his feet mixed up while 
playing tennis. 

The members of the Volunteer Band had their 
last meeting of the term, Friday evening, in 
the woods near the Wildcat. The girls served 
a picnic lunch. 

Miss Winifred Dal ton entertained Margaret 
Cunningham, Mary Copley, Edith Forsythe, 
and Mattie Pitman at a six-o'clock dinner 
one evening last week. 

The students in the agricultural course have 
petioned the Board of Regents to revise their 
course and give them more agricultural studies 
in the third and fourth years. 

The students in on9 of Miss Short's classes 
were amused one day recently by the antics of a 
small black spider and Miss" Short's exclama- 
tions and efforts to capture it. 

W. B. Neal, a former '05. has been attending 
the University of Oregon. He recently had a 
very narrow escape from drowning." While 
attempting to shoot the rapids of the Willamette 
river his boat was overturned and his friend 
was drowned. 

At the Athletic Association meeting Sat: 
urday, the following managers were elected, 
Carrol Walker, baseball: Amer Nvstrom: 
basket-ball: Clarence Nevins, track athletics- 
Allen Phillips, tennis. Th.3 ball players were 
given their suits, also. 

Say! Mr. Professor, Assistant, Graduate or 
Student, we are going to get out a special mid- 
summer numl>er.. We want to know what you 
are doing this summer. Just drop us a line 
and we will put it in straight: if not, its hard 
to tell what we might not say about vou. Anv 
time before July 20. 

St Mary's played their first game of the sea 
son against a strong college team on other than 
their home grounds Monday, when they played 
K. U. at Lawrence. K. U. won an easv victory 
with a score of 10 to 5. Wilson, the Ja v hawker 
left helder, got two home runs. K. Untouched 
Bakule for 12 safe ones. Hoffman gave 7 hits. 

Among the students and former students of 
K. S. A. C, who are attending the Rilev 
county institute in Manhattan we find the 
following: Elsie Ayars, Alice Shofe, Julia 
Wendel Odessa Dow, Lea Jones, Veda Simp- 
son, Mary Lane, Chloe Willis, Blanche 
Stevens Margaret Cole, Agnes Soupene, Lela 
Parks Rose and Marguerite James, Adelia 

sSwi ft Kut ? Co S ,e * W ' A - Undershot, 
virl n^i ^ nnie Car °aban. J. M. 
mS*& J**™* Sluing, Wm . Phinney 
Blanche Evans, Van Smith, Junie Parks 

^E^SSSk^ SUterly ' ***** Dieble ^ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



507 



|. SNAPPY SUITS 
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Six K. U. trackmen have earned "K's" this 
season. 

The creamery shipped 1080 pounds of butter 
last week. 

Ny strom will wait on the farmers at the 
creamery this summer. 

C. E. Whipple spent Sunday in Topeka visit- 
ing- his brother, J. H. Whipple, '04. 

The baseball game between the juniors and 
sophomores resulted in a victory for the former. 
Score 6 to 7. . ; 

Frank Boyd and wi'e Mamie (Alexander) 
Boyd, of Phlillipsburg, are visiting with the 
Alexanders this week. 

Mrs. Otto Lewis, of Indianapolis, Ind., is 
visiting with her father-in-law, Janitor Lewis, 
and family this week. Her husband is ex- 
acted here in about three weeks. 

The delegation to the Geneva Summer Con- 
ference will leave on Thursday afternoon and 
spend ten days at Geneva. The fellows who 
will go are: Philips, Cunningham, Gernert, 
Shaefer, Taft, McLean, and probably some 
others. 

The Music Department assisted in entertain- 
ing the visitors last Thursday afternoon by 
giving a recital in the Auditorium. About 
eight "numbers were rendered. Each number 
was heartily applauded, the Glee Club respond- 
ing to an encore. 

Rev. Daniel McGurk delivered the baccalau- 
reate sermon to the seniors at the Auditorium 
Sunday afternoon. His subject was "Religion 
and Life." He is a clear, forcible speaker and 
made his points in a masterful way. About 
two thousand students and town people were 
present. 

Last Saturdav evening the D. S. hall was 
filled with a collection of athletes, members of 
the rooters' clubs and the Athletic Association. 
After a short program consisting of speeches 
by- President Nichols, the coaches, and the 
various managers, twenty-eight monograms 
were awarded. Six went to members of the 
basket-ball team, twelve to the baseball team, 
and ten to the track team. Coaches Ahearn 
and Melick were each presented with "scrump- 
tious" chairs, which they gracefully accepted. 
The assembly dispersed after all the punch was 
gone. • 



Only six members of th,e track team have 
won monograms this spring. The following 
members have made over 15 points; Milligan 
29}, Watkins 29*. Seng 26, Cain 25f, Edelblute 
18i, and Oskins 18. 

The State University athletic board adopted- 
the general assessment plan which the classes 
had earlier pledged themselves to. The con- 
sent of the board of regents is necessary before 
the plan can be enforced. 



Treasurer's Report, K. S. A. C. A. A* 

JUNK 8. 1906. 
BKSOURCE8. 

Cash from ex-treasurer t 1 17 47 

Membership dues 37 30 

Basket-ball games at home 381 86 

on trip 60 3* 

From class 3 75 

Score-cards basket-ball 9 10 

Season tickets for grand-stand 188 00 

baseball 623 65 

From games at home 818 00 

ontrip.. 1H85 

Track meets at home 132 00 

Total ..-■ &316 50 

LIABILITIES. 

Basket-ball: 

Equipment I 46 03 

Rent of hall 89 00 

Advertising ... 1« 04 

Visiting teams 183 25 

Team on trip 75 00 

Coach - SOW 

Total - * 462 22 

Baseball: 

Equipment i»fj «* 

Advertising 13 41 

Visiting teams 460 11 

Team on trip w Jj» 

Umpire w Jjg 

Salary of coach U» on 

Medical services '*» 0° 

Total 9,36 ° 

Track team: 

Equipment. * "> «* 

Visiting teams ■*• 146 76 

Team on trip m*m 

Labor on track g g 

Coach salary "" jg 

Total W 4° 

Miscellaneous: j ' 

Sundries • 2? £ 

Backbills j'™ 

Labor on park.. ■ « g 

Grand-stand 326 °° 

Total 471 51 

Total expense • &J~f 73 

Cash in hands of treasurer ,.»» " 

Grand total <* 316 g 

..... WM. ANDBBSON. Treaturer. 



508 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



r 



L 



BUY YOUR VACATION STATIONERY AT THE 

Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

You will also need a new fountain pen for the summer. QET IT NOW. Either a 
Waterman or a Parker. We are also HEADQUARTERS for all other COLLEGE 
SUPPLIES. SEE US. 

C. S. JONES, flanager. 



^ 



J 



Alumni and Former Students. 

W. H. Harold, '05, was in town last Wednes- 
day. 

George Wolf, '05, came in from Chicago 
Sunday for a short visit at home. 

W. F. Kerr, who is farming near Clay Cen- 
ter, is around College for Commencement. 

Mary (O' Daniel) Scott, '04, came up from 
New Mexico to attend the O' Daniel- Amos wed- 
ding. 

Invitations are out for the wedding of Ger- 
trude Givens and F. L. Grimm, both former 
students. 

Stella Clure, student in '03, came down from 
Des Moines, Iowa, last week to visit Manhat- 
tan friends. 

Louise Spohr, '99, head of Park View 
Hospital, left last Saturday for Rochester, N. 
Y., to visit relatives. 

Or a Yenawine, '95, instructor of domestic 
art, Barber's Memorial Seminary, Anniston, 
Ala., is visiting relatives in Manhattan. 

Miss Clara Spilman, '00, instructor in do- 
mestic science at the Christian Orphans' Home, 
Camden Point, Mo., is home for her summer 
vacation. 

Hetta Womer, '04, senior in the four-year 
pharmacy course at K. U., stopped last week 
on her way home and visited College friends in 
Manhattan. 

Glen Kdgerton, '04, who has just finished his 
second year's work at West Point Military 
Academy, is expected home next week to spend 
the summer- 
Florence Ritchie, '04, has resigned her posi- 
tion as teacher of domestic science in the Girls' 
Industrial School at Beloit. Cora McNutt, '06, 
will take up the work July 1. 



Elsie Crump, '95, and James A. Ames were 
married at Boise City, Idaho, May 27. Miss 
Crump has been teaching in the city schools of 
Boulder, Colo., since leaving here in 1902. 
Mr. Ames is a member of the Palace Market 
Company of Boise City. They are at home to 
their many friends at 1020 State street. 



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Men's perfect-fitting union 
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Copyright 1906 

8 Kuppsnhetmar & Co, 

Chicago 



E. L. Knostman 



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